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jcphelps
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I have question , since we are living in the age of e-books, would fellow movie bufss prefer to get their movie star bios, or movie histories or any other books on the movies, via kindle or nook or in good old paper. I ask because lately I find myself so use to my Kindle, that I'm tempted to switch over to getting my movie bios on it as well. Have others made the leap?

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No, I'll never make the leap. The book reading experience (in hand) is something I will never change. I can understand the pluses of e-books/kindles etc. but I will never cross over..........

 

Edited by: Hibi on Jun 6, 2013 10:04 AM

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I have a kindle but do really enjoy using- yes it's convenient- to read free content but I prefer traditional books, There is something magical about the smell and feel of printed paper that can not be replaced by a cold screen.

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> {quote:title=jcphelps wrote:}{quote}I have question , since we are living in the age of e-books, would fellow movie bufss prefer to get their movie star bios, or movie histories or any other books on the movies, via kindle or nook or in good old paper. I ask because lately I find myself so use to my Kindle, that I'm tempted to switch over to getting my movie bios on it as well. Have others made the leap?

As a former used book dealer with a personal collection of over 8,000 titles, I think my answer is rather predictable. ;) Hardbacks with dust jackets first (if they came with them to begin with), trade paperbacks second, and everything else a distant last. Fortunately one aspect of the rise of Amazon is that if you can wait less than a year after the date of publication, many hardbacks are now cheaper that the e-book version. This is a buyer's market in books like we've never seen before.

 

 

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Andy, how interesting. A (former) used book dealer !

 

I worked in book retail for years too, although not in the used book business. I bet, in many ways, that is more rewarding than working in "new" book stores.

 

Still, there were many things I loved about bookselling. Seeing the new titles come in, always knowing what was coming out by my favourite writers, and helping people find and choose great books (or even sometimes not-so-great.)

 

 

I too have a huge book collection, though maybe somewhat shy of 8,000. A lot of film books, some "coffee table" titles filled with luscious pics of stills from movies, some biographies of actors, directors, and producers, and some (my favourite) explorations of various types of movies - lots of titles on film noir.

 

 

So, I guess, like you, the answer for me is obvious: I'll take an actual physical print and paper book over an "e-reader" every time. I agree with joel, who spoke of how he liked the smell and feel of real books. I love not just the writing/ideas/stories in books - which, yes, an e-reader can provide - but also the physical presence of them, turning the page is so much more satisfying than scrolling, holding an actual book is more comforting, somehow, than holding one of those tiny little digital devices.

 

 

Anyway, when it comes to books about movies, I should think actual books would be most people's choice, since much of what we enjoy about movie books is the pics, as I noted earlier. I can't imagine a "kindle" giving readers the kind of big impressive photos that real books can .

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I love books and have quite the collection that dates back to my high school days. I have film related books, architecture, history, current events and more.

 

The last time we moved, we clocked in at over twenty boxes of just books.

 

MrCutter got me two great books for Christmas last year. One by favorite mid-century modern author, Alan Hess and the other on my beloved City of Angels.

 

That said, a few years ago MrC got me a Kindle which I absolutely love. It comes in very handy for traveling, for sitting in the lobby of a Hollywood hotel waiting for a Club TCM to open at Festival time, sitting in the coffee shop waiting for a friend to show up.

 

The Kindle is lightweight (even with the 3G), easy to carry and less of a hassle to travel with than a traditional book.

 

Will I give up buying books? Not going to happen. I love books too much and some you just have to own.

 

But when it comes to traveling, I love my Kindle.

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I have had to use an e-reader this semester as there are two reference works which are required which are no longer printed and it would be impractical to carry some of the books to class.

 

I do not like it for reference because there is no way to bend pages over so as to compare what is written on a previous page with what is written on the current page. It is also not practical to compare charts and graphs on adjoining pages.

 

I have read novels on it but I do not like it as it is hard and not comfortable.

 

It is my conclusion that e-readers have their place but they will not replace printed books for those who need more from their books than a meted-out amount of text.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}Andy, how interesting. A (former) used book dealer !

>

> I worked in book retail for years too, although not in the used book business. I bet, in many ways, that is more rewarding than working in "new" book stores.

>

>

> Still, there were many things I loved about bookselling. Seeing the new titles come in, always knowing what was coming out by my favourite writers, and helping people find and choose great books (or even sometimes not-so-great.)

>

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I have to admit that I had the best of both of those worlds, in that I got to pick from collections that often dated back to the early 20th century, while at the same time I was buying new books from the head book reviewer of the Washington Post. It was like being turned loose in a candy store for 23 years. I might add that this reviewer always had me make the check out to a local Friends of the Library group, and never took a dime of it for himself.

 

One minor regret in hindsight about my personal collection is that I didn't pay particular attention to movie books. About a dozen or so years ago, a man sold me what must have been nearly a complete run of the old Citadel "The Films of...." series, which are a terrific introduction to many of Hollywood's leading stars and their films. I could have had an instant collection, but instead I took home only about half a dozen of them, and sold all the rest. Of course now that I've discovered TCM, I wish I'd kept a lot more, but then everyone's Hindsight IQ is always about 50 points higher than our IQ in the present.

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Well, one thing that is both a boon and a drawback, making your living selling books, is the constant temptation to possess them yourself, to add yet one more to your collection. For people who love books themselves (as opposed to just the text that goes on "kindles"), you're right, working with them is like "being turned loose in a candy store".

 

Andy, speaking of film periodicals, although I'm afraid I've barely heard of the series you refer to, there was a great movie magazine, back in the 90s, called Film Comment. The book store I worked in used to sell it, but then they stopped stocking it-maybe not enough buyers. It was very good, with articles about old films as well as new ones.

 

I know an argument many make for e-readers is the lack of clutter...People who love actual books and are constantly buying more often end up having trouble finding where to store them all. For a while I literally had a few stacks of books sitting around, here and there. Nothing like the kind of thing you see on those depressing "hoarder" reality shows, didn't get that far, but still, a problem with so many books, so little space.

For that reason, I can see the usefulness of kindles, e-readers, whatever you want to call them, in terms of books that you might not want to keep after you've read them - flashinthepan "bestsellers", so-called "beach reading", etc.

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I've been meaning to mention a rather incredible set of books I have for some time on here, and this thread seems as good a place as any. At Half Price Books over a couple of years, I bought a series of coffee table sized books, each one focusing on a different Hollywood studio, featuring a chronological listing of every film ever released by that studio at least up to the point of publication (all these books came out anywhere between about 1979 and 1988, I would say), a plot description for each movie along with cast/crew info and, if not exactly a review, a sentence or two assessing whether the movie is worth seeing or not. Sometimes, the text includes an interesting backstory behind the movie, the very sort of things RO and BM will say before a film airs. Sometimes, what they have to say is so similar to what's printed in the books about the movies I feel certain TCM must have these very books as reference material. And there's a photo accompanying every A-budget picture and many of the B-pictures as well! I believe the books are British in origin. I have THE MGM STORY, THE WARNER BROTHERS STORY, THE RKO STORY, THE COLUMBIA STORY, THE PARAMOUNT STORY and THE UNIVERSAL STORY. Missing from my collection are books for 20th Century Fox and United Artists, but such books exist. I had seen both of them on the shelves at HPB quite a few years ago before I realized how valuable it would be to own them. I go and scan the shelves at least once a month hoping those books will eventually return.

 

Very often when TCM airs a film with which I'm unfamiliar, I pick up one of these books and do a little reading before watching said film. Now, they're cumbersome and unwieldy, for sure, but they were assembled in an era when people still bought encyclopedia sets and no one imagined how different the world would become. I still think it's easier to quickly seek out a specific movie in this format than trying to find info online, especially the pictures.

 

My niece was selling magazine subscriptions as a fundraiser for her private school, and I bought a year's subscription to NEWSWEEK. A week after I got my subscription, NEWSWEEK announced they would become an online-only publication in three months' time! They honored my subscription, and they send me my e-edition every week. But I find that while I read every issue I got during the three months there was still a physical edition from cover to cover, there are entire issues in my e-edition collection that I haven't even looked at. The format for turning pages or jumping around within a magazine online is a bit of a thrashing. And I'm just not interested in using my laptop or smart phone to read anything longer than a Wikipedia entry; my eyes just don't like that format. I don't own a Kindle or a Nook. I just can't imagine reading an entire book on a device with that glare, even if you can adjust it.

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There are so many books I haven't yet got around to reading, one might think a Kindle would attract my attention. But as I'm NOT stupid enough to pay more than $15 for a haircut, or more than $25 for a pair of jeans, the price of a small one just doesn't make sense to me. Especially since I look for those older titles that I missed out on when they first came out. I've been able to locate some in thrift stores for $1.21 and lower( if in paperback, then it's 50 cents). As I said, Kindles and Nooks are attractive, costly items. If I get absent minded and walk off leaving my $1 book or 50 cent paperback behind for a minute or two, chances are it'll be there when I go to retrieve it. NEVER had a book stolen in my life. Replacing a damaged book( water, fire, or any other type of mishap) requires only another $1 to 50 cent investment. If I drop my book, I simply pick it up, brush it off and I'm good to go.

 

 

It would all boil down to the paperback vs hardcover debate. In that respect, I really don't care. As long as the words inside are the same, it makes no difference to me. The only real advantage to hardcover is longevity. I have several paperback editions of books that are as old as many of the hardcovers in my library, and the hardcovers look reletively new in comparison.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

>

> Andy, speaking of film periodicals, although I'm afraid I've barely heard of the series you refer to, there was a great movie magazine, back in the 90s, called Film Comment. The book store I worked in used to sell it, but then they stopped stocking it-mayb not enough buyers. It was very good, with articles about old films as well as new ones.

>

> I know an argument many make for e-readers is the lack of clutter...People who love actual books and are constantly buying more often end up having trouble finding where to store them all. For a while I literally had a few stacks of books sitting around, here and there. Nothing like the kind of thing you see on those depressing "hoarder" reality shows, didn't get that far, but still, a problem with so many books, so little space.

> For that reason, I can see the usefulness of kindles, e-readers, whatever you want to call them, in terms of books that you might not want to keep after you've read them - flashinthepan "bestsellers", so-called "beach reading", etc.

Misswonderly, I guess I wasn't clear about that Citadel "series". It wasn't a periodical, but a "series" of books that the Citadel Publishing Co. issued from the 60's into the 80's. They were what you might call small coffee table books, 8.5" x 11" and usually running about 200 to 300 pages. They varied in quality, but even the worst ones were useful for the basics: Brief bios; complete filmography with full cast, plot summaries, and a sample of the reviews of the time. If you look on abebooks.com and search for "The Films of" with Citadel as the publisher between 1960 and 1990, you can currently find 2209 choices, ranging from under $4.00 (with free shipping) for such stars as Bogey, Cagney, Bette, and Reagan, all the way up to $1,995 for Anthony Quinn. I should add that nearly all stars have multiple choices with varying prices and conditions, and that same Quinn book is also available for $5.00 as well as $1,995.00! I always confine my searches for hardback copies with dust jackets, but if that's not important to you, you can almost always find what you're looking for for well under $20.00.

 

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?bi=0&bx=off&ds=50&pn=citadel&recentlyadded=all&sortby=17&sts=t&tn=%22thefilmsof%22&x=51&y=7&yrh=1990&yrl=1960

 

As for clutter and the space problem, that's a matter of personal preference and how much wall space you have. I grew up in a house filled with books, and I can't even imagine living any other way, but each to his or her own when it comes to that sort of a decision.

 

And BTW to finance's point about book theft by book store employees, I never had that problem, since I always allowed my employees to buy any book at whatever price I'd paid for it. I think it's more the chain stores that run into theft problems, rather than smaller shops such as my own.

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If your interest in books is solely in the content, then used paperbacks are almost always going to be the best choice, since in the great majority of cases they'll be priced at less than the kindle version. The only real advantage to e-books is to people with limited space, or to people who travel a lot and want to carry their entire book collection around with them. Other than for those groups, though, I fail to see the point of e-books.

 

And of course one other advantage to print editions, especially hardbacks with dust jackets, is that depending on the title and the edition, they often have resale value. By contrast, I don't think you can ever recover that money you drop on a kindle "book", since as far as I know they're non-transferrable.

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}A lot of people who work in book stores must be fired, then, for stealing books from the store.

I can't think of what I said to make you think that...maybe my quoting Andy's observation that a book lover working in a book shop is "like a kid in a candy shop" ?

 

If you were to go by your seeming assumption that people who are employed around objects they love will steal them, than I don't believe our retail-focussed economy would have lasted as long as it has.

 

Yeah, for sure, human nature being what it is, some employees probably yield to temptation and help themselves to whatever the store they work in is selling (not limited to book stores -could be anything- hardware stores, clothing shops, whatever...). But I don't believe this is as widespread as your post would suggest.

 

Also: people who love to read and love books have higher moral standards than non-readers. ]:)

 

(now, people, keep your shirts on...the above statement is clearly not a serious one. Maybe.)

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Andy wrote:

 

" ...As for clutter and the space problem, that's a matter of personal preference and how much wall space you have. I grew up in a house filled with books, and I can't even imagine living any other way, but each to his or her own when it comes to that sort of a decision...."

 

Maybe I didn't make myself clear...I don't really regard books as "clutter", and like you, feel my beloved book collection is well worth whatever space it takes up. I too grew up in a house filled with books, as is my own. Walk into our living room, and two of the four walls are filled with bookshelves- and books, books, obviously. And that's the way I like it.

I guess I was trying to see things from many another's point of view. Lots of people do consider an excess of books to be "clutter".

Getting back to e-readers, every now and then I see "get organized"articles about how to cut down on clutter in one's home, and these articles always suggest getting rid of one's books and switching to e-readers.

Silly article -writers...don't they know that books are not clutter, and I'd rather have my books than a perfectly tidy home.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}Andy wrote:

>

> " ...As for clutter and the space problem, that's a matter of personal preference and how much wall space you have. I grew up in a house filled with books, and I can't even imagine living any other way, but each to his or her own when it comes to that sort of a decision...."

>

> Maybe I didn't make myself clear...I don't really regard books as "clutter", and like you, feel my beloved book collection is well worth whatever space it takes up. I too grew up in a house filled with books, as is my own. Walk into our living room, and two of the four walls are filled with bookshelves- and books, books, obviously. And that's the way I like it.

> I guess I was trying to see things from many another's point of view. Lots of people do consider an excess of books to be "clutter".

> Getting back to e-readers, every now and then I see "get organized"articles about how to cut down on clutter in one's home, and these articles always suggest getting rid of one's books and switching to e-readers.

> Silly article -writers...don't they know that books are not clutter, and I'd rather have my books than a perfectly tidy home.

>

Sorry, misswonderly, I should have made it clear that my comment about clutter was directed at the general argument, and not at you personally. And of course books are only "clutter" if they're not the books you want around. "Clutter" is 10 pairs of jeans, 10 suits, 20 dresses, or 20 pairs of shoes. Now *that's* what those "get organized" articles should be talking about. B-)

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Slightly off-topic (but only slightly), the same kind of thinking that would rid a home of books because they are "clutter" would also use digital devices for everything that I collect and value.

 

For instance, the records and CDs my husband and I have collected for years...the clutter-free organizers say "get rid of those records and CDs ! Download all your music to iPods and the hard-drive in your computer ! In fact, why bother with a personal music collection at all, just listen to music off the computer !"

 

Beloved old family photographs - "Get rid of those cluttery old photos. just scan them onto your computer !"

 

Even art '"Why bother with pictures? Get an ever-changing digital wall fixture instead of hanging those bothersome paintings and prints !"

 

Movies: "Ditch your DVDs ! Just watch everything streamed, or use Youtube, or Netflix. Don't clutter up your home with useless clunkly articles like books, Cds, pictures, photos, and DVDs ! Everything can go digital !"

 

 

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Well, I've also got about 2500 movie DVDs and about 1200 R&B 45's from the 50's and 60's, so it isn't just the books. I'll probably never be completely satisfied until I have the entire 20th century at my fingertips, and I don't mean just via the internet. That's cheating. ;)

 

OTOH I do make one concession to the digital world: My continually updated list of DVDs is contained in Word and Excel folders. To try to put all that info on index cards and in metal card folders would be taking my Luddite-ism to near-Luddite degrees. I may be insane, but I don't want my status to be noticed and formalized by the outside world. B-)

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