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Film Noir Fridays: Can't Hardly Wait !


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MissW, I think the Robert Mitchum remake, properly titled Farewell My Lovely, is pretty good, too. Yeah, Mitch was looking a little long in the private eye tooth but his beat up appearance still was effective. And I love the '40s noirish sounding musical score of that film. It sounds representative of lonely people in the big city, particular with that coronet lead. My chief complaint about the film is that so much of it is set in the dark that sometimes it's a little difficult to make out everything.

 

But Dick Powell and the stylish Murder My Sweet is still a very special Marlowe treat for me. And it's a film with the role and performance of Mike Mazurki's career. Mazurki managed to be both threatening and sympathetic.

 

The drug induced hallucination scene to which you referred in the Powell version is a gem, more impressive, I feel, than when they did a variation of it in the Mitchum remake.

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>Yeah, but I wish that all the films shown were straight-on noirs. THE LEOPARD MAN certainly wasn't.

 

>It was a spooky noir. :)

 

Yep, finance. Just envision all those women being shot with a snub-nose S&W .38 instead of being mauled to death, and I think that might help ya here! ;)

 

(...then again of course, they probably would have had to change the title, huh!)

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I don't want to upset anyone, but I've always thought that Deadline at Dawn is the most unbelievable film ever made, with 6 to 9 people going in and out of the dead lady's apartment, while she was still lying dead on the floor, yet no one called the police, even with the police station just across the street.

 

Does anyone else think that?

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Yeah, there sure were a whole lot of "coincidences" and a little too much of great "deductive sleuthing" goin' on in that one, alight...especially all the excellent "deductive sleuthing" goin' on by Bill Williams as the dim-witted sailor and especially during that whole "orangeade stand" sequence. Uh huh..."After I would've killed somebody, the very FIRST thing I would've done would've been to walk over and get me some of that cool refreshing drink of ORANGEADE!" Uh huh...yeah...riiiiiight.

 

(...btw, is it just me here or did Bill Williams remind anyone else around here of Kevin Spacey???...hmmmm...maybe another one I should post in the "Lookalikes" thread, eh?!)

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I've been going through some noir sets I've had for a long time, and I finally got around to watching "Murder My Sweet" just last week. I love noir, but to be honest with you, this one missed the mark with me. You have everybody speaking really exaggerated noir-speak, and there is a plot device - the jade - that I simply do not care about.

 

As a film there is much to like here - good atmosphere, good score, interesting photography. It's just some of the basics such as dialogue and plot that hit the ground with a thud for me. If this was Dick Powell's very first foray into film noir I'm surprised he got a second gig, and I say that as a fan of most of his films that came before and after.

 

I shall now prepare to be pelted with eggs and tomatoes.

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>Uh huh..."After I would've killed somebody, the very FIRST thing I would've done would've been to walk over and get me some of that cool refreshing drink of ORANGEADE!" Uh huh...yeah...riiiiiight.

 

Yeah, I agree.

 

The young girl and the sailor track down some of the suspects, just based on how they decided not to drink an orange soda after ordering it, and they figured the killer must have done the same thing too. Hey, we need them on the NYPD staff.

 

No, on second thought, they were wrong.

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>I shall now prepare to be pelted with eggs and tomatoes.

 

LOL

 

Well calvin, yep, I think you might prepare yourself for that, alright! ;)

 

Now, while I'm not the biggest of Dick Powell fans, I think his line-readings of Chandler's "Noir-Speak" in this baby are excellently done....though as you note, in Powell's later efforts such as in 1945's Cornered and 1947's Johnny O'Clock,I've always thought his line-deliveries in THOSE seemed rather "stilted".

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> {quote:title=Dargo2 wrote:}{quote}

> > I shall now prepare to be pelted with eggs and tomatoes.

> LOL

>

> Well calvin, yep, I think you might prepare yourself for that, alright! ;)

>

> Now, while I'm not the biggest of Dick Powell fans, I think his line-readings of Chandler's "Noir-Speak" in this baby are excellently done....though as you note, in Powell's later efforts such as in 1945's *Cornered and 1947's *Johnny O'Clock,I've always thought his line-deliveries in THOSE seemed rather "stilted".

Yep, eggs and tomatoes I expect, just like every time I voice my opinion of "The Last Flight", which is an opinion that seems to run counter to that of everyone else on earth.

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Eeh! I wouldn't worry too much about having that "opinion that runs counter to everyone else's" around here, Cal ol' boy.

 

Well, that is UNLESS of course you might one day find yourself posting the somethin' like: "Hey folks! You know those movies where Cary Grant is being chased out on NYC and ends up heading in a northwesterly direction across the U.S., AND that one about some British dude who goes to the Middle East and rallies the Arabs against the Turks? Well, I don't think TCM shows those movies NEAR enough if ya ask ME!"

 

(...'cause THEN ya might find yourself REALLY gettin' the business from more than a few of the folks around here!) ;)

 

LOL

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Just want to say I really liked the host of Friday night Noir and his choice a films. TCM has done a great job with Fridays recently, I really liked Illeans Douglas too....

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}By the way...maybe it's just me, but everytime I saw Mr. Muller doing his intros, he kept reminding me of someone, but I couldn't think who.

>

> It struck me yesterday: Eddie Muller looks to me like a combination of John Lithgow and (a younger than he is now) Christopher Walken.

>

 

I think he looks a bit like David Lynch.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}By the way...maybe it's just me, but everytime I saw Mr. Muller doing his intros, he kept reminding me of someone, but I couldn't think who.

> >

> > It struck me yesterday: Eddie Muller looks to me like a combination of John Lithgow and (a younger than he is now) Christopher Walken.

> > I think he looks a bit like David Lynch.

His constant facial expression reminds me a lot of the former Washington Redskins announcer Frank Herzog.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ6-aQqVdmnGcwZwzQ1rey

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None of the actors playing Marlowe manage to get him quite right. They

all seem to be missing something. But it has to be kept in mind that it's

hard to translate a character from a book into a movie and get it exactly

right. Powell isn't too bad, but he's rather on the rough and simplistic side.

He does handle the wise guy patter pretty well. I had to laugh when Claire

Trevor complimented him on his physique when he was in his sleeveless

tee shirt. Standards of buffness have changed over the years, and today

Powell looks like a 98 pound weakling. It seems that in many of the novels

Marlowe comes across some type of quack who drugs him in some way

and locks him up in a sparsely furnished room where he does a dance with

imaginary mice for a few days. He always recovers. Maybe he's built up an

immunity.

 

 

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Thanks to everyone in this forum for their kind words and enthusiasm re my hosting of the Friday Night Spotlight. A couple of final notes:

 

1) As I noted in my intro, don't watch (or read) Woolrich for logic. I tend to think of EVERYTHING he produced as the work of a fevered, paramoid brain. He wasn't a crime writer, or anything resembling a realist. To me, he wrote nightmares—and they make about as much sense as our nightmares. DEADLINE AT DAWN is more like Scorsese's AFTER HOURS or a Lynch film than a normal RKO noir.

 

2) I didn't really like Dick Powell at first, either. Now I think he's one of the most underrated talents or that era, not merely as an actor but as a producer. Be sure to catch PITFALL when TCM screens it in September. That's his film: he produced it, hired de Toth to direct and rework the script, hired Bill Bowwrs to rewrite the final script. Great film.

 

3) I'm soon going into production on my first feature film, "The Frank Herzog Story." I'll play both the leads (as John Lithgow and Christopher Walken) and will also direct (as David Lynch).

 

4) Big thanks to everyone at TCM, especially Charlie Tabesh and Darcy Hettrich, for letting me have so much fun. Who knows, maybe we'll do it again.

 

Cheers,

 

Eddie M

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My choice for Marlowe: William Holden. I can see him smoking a pipe and working out chess problems, like the Marlowe in Chandler's novels. He has the requisite virility and certainly could handle a few drinks. And when it comes to the voiceover narration ... see SUNSET BLVD, probably the best voiceover narration of all-time.

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>Who knows, maybe we'll do it again.

 

Sure hope so, Eddie. I thought your lead-ins were excellent not only in content and insight, but in your presentation as well.

 

Cheers to you, sir!

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> {quote:title=Eddie_Muller wrote:}{quote}Thanks to everyone in this forum for their kind words and enthusiasm re my hosting of the Friday Night Spotlight. A couple of final notes:

>

> 3) I'm soon going into production on my first feature film, "The Frank Herzog Story." I'll play both the leads (as John Lithgow and Christopher Walken) and will also direct (as David Lynch).

>

> Cheers,

>

> Eddie M

>

 

:D:D:D I'm looking forward to that film...

 

Seriously, I do hope you get to do it again, on TCM. Thanks!

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> {quote:title=Eddie_Muller wrote}{quote}

>

> 1) As I noted in my intro, don't watch (or read) Woolrich for logic. I tend to think of EVERYTHING he produced as the work of a fevered, paramoid brain. He wasn't a crime writer, or anything resembling a realist. To me, he wrote nightmares—and they make about as much sense as our nightmares. DEADLINE AT DAWN is more like Scorsese's AFTER HOURS or a Lynch film than a normal RKO noir.

>

Well, Mulholland Drive made my brain hurt, for whatever that's worth! :D

> 2) I didn't really like Dick Powell at first, either. Now I think he's one of the most underrated talents or that era, not merely as an actor but as a producer. Be sure to catch PITFALL when TCM screens it in September. That's his film: he produced it, hired de Toth to direct and rework the script, hired Bill Bowwrs to rewrite the final script. Great film.

Pitfall is showing up in September?!? Very cool. I just streamed it on Amazon Prime a few weeks ago (inspired by this very thread) and can certainly chime in my own recommendation (though I've a hunch that Mr. Muller's opinion holds a tad more gravitas than mine :) ).

> 3) I'm soon going into production on my first feature film, "The Frank Herzog Story." I'll play both the leads (as John Lithgow and Christopher Walken) and will also direct (as David Lynch).

Hmmm . . . sounds like this too could mirror the work of a "fevered, paranoid brain". A nightmarish-noir-to-be, perchance? ;)

 

 

 

> 4) Big thanks to everyone at TCM, especially Charlie Tabesh and Darcy Hettrich, for letting me have so much fun. Who knows, maybe we'll do it again.

>

> Cheers,

>

>

> Eddie M

>

Thank you again for the hosting gig *and* for stopping by the thread. Here's hoping for that return appearance.

 

Edited by: NoraCharles1934 on Jun 30, 2013 12:18 AM

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William Holden would have been an excellent choice for Marlowe and yes, he could get the patter down pat. Now all we would have needed was for Columbia or Paramount to have made a Marlowe film.

 

The one that gets me is that Fox hired George Montgomery for their second version of "The High Window" called THE BRASHED DOUBLOON and this was while they has the likes of Mature, Conte, Widmark and Payne on the lot. OK, Payne had to leave the studio to make a change in his image, just as Powell had to do earlier. Funny, both those two started at Warners as light leading men in musical comedy and they wanted to stretch into tough guys while the biggest attraction at Warners, James Cagney, wanted to be a song and dance man.

 

As far as your own image on screen, I saw you as a cross between Martin Sheen and James Woods. Most of the pics I see of you on Google have you smiling, but this one suggests to me that I can put a gat in your hand and make you convincing if I ever muster up the funds for another Marlowe film. I collected $1.98 today, but that was from ripping off the collection plate in church, but it's a start. I just have to go to another church next time.

 

muller.jpg?width=400&height=300

 

What did you think of the Marlowe of Powers Boothe? I didn't see all of them, not all played stateside, but I thought he was commendable. The issue there was that it was too obvious that the rest of the actors were Brits so it wasn't exactly convincing. A darn good try though.

 

Anyway, thanks for the films and the intros. Even if it could just be a once-a-month event, it would be nice to have you back.

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