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TomJH

DARK PASSAGE

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Wow! I'm thoroughly enjoying the quality of this discussion!!! Lots of really outrageously wonderful thoughts here about this film, about Bogie, Bacall, the other actors, etc! Groove! Now I wish I had saved the flick on the DVR to watch again, cos that's precisely what I wanna do!!! Can't wait until it makes the rounds again on TCM!

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> {quote:title=AddisonDeWitless wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=AndyM108 wrote:}{quote}

> >

> > *But the main reason I keep coming back to Dark Passage is the sheer romaticism of the improbable pairing of a falsely accused, rather weatherworn, mid-40ish man on the lam with a drop-dead gorgeous 23-year old woman of flaring nostrils and independent means, complete with a ready-made theme song that follows them all the way from her apartment in San Francisco to a little bar in Peru. To me the whole movie is just too marvelous for words. cinematic flaws be damned.*

> >

> That is poetry, man.

> And it almost makes me change my mind about the film.

>

> ps- (I totally get why others like it though.) I have plenty o' "flawed but loved" titles of me own.

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> pss- you also nailed The Fountainhead. Seriously, give it another shot some time when it's on. It's the most outrageous comedy of the 1940's besides maybe 1941's Tomorrow: the World!. I never watch it without being doubled over, tears streaming down my face.

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> psss- seriously.

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> Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Jun 16, 2013 3:48 PM

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> Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Jun 16, 2013 3:48 PM

> now I had to go and mess up the colors.

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> *aw shucks*

> *im just a humble cockroach*

*jumping from one key*

*to another*

*even as mehitabel*

*is holding aw shucks*

*captive within*

*some alien box B-)*

 

Since I did at one point record The Fountainhead, probably to ward off any visits from a future House Committee on Un-American Activities, I'll give it another shot. But there's no way it'll ever match the Twin Pillars of Sublime Self-Parody: Reefer Madness and My Son John.

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The Fountainhead has Reefer Madness beat when it comes to larfs, but I stress that is my personal taste.

 

anyhoos...

 

 

Back to Dark Passage, I'm curious what those of you who like it think of Dead Reckoning (also 1947?) with Humphrey Bogart paired (for the only time?) with Lizabeth Scott. To me, it seems a companion piece to Dark Passage in that both seem at times presciently conscious of the fact that they are noirs well before (I think) the term was coined.

 

 

It's a film I *loved* as a kid, but on re-watching it recently, found it to be almost a gentle send-up, bordering on parody of the whole noir genre- kind of conscious of its own movieness and willing to embrace the audacious aspects of its plot- which to me, makes it a sister film of sorts to Dark Passage.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Jun 16, 2013 7:47 PM

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Jun 16, 2013 7:48 PM

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It's been a while for me and Dead Reckoning, so I should probably see it again before saying too much. I remember enjoying it well enough, but not being particularly impressed. Actually, what most sticks in my mind is just how much Liz Scott seemed like a Lauren Bacall place-holder. Particularly when they whipped out the beret -

 

Dead%2520Reckoning.jpgThe%2520Big%2520Sleep.jpg

 

Edited by: NoraCharles1934 on Jun 16, 2013 7:16 PM

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Addison, it's been a few years since I last saw Dead Reckoning, a tough guy noir made when Bogart was at the peak of his career (Lizabeth Scott became a substitute when Columbia couldn't get Lauren Bacall for the film, I believe). While it's slick and reasonably entertaining, I'm inclined to agree with you that at times it comes perilously close to seeming like an unintentional parody of the film noir genre. I recall snickering at some of the tough guy (and gal) dialogue, though, unfortunately, I can't recite any of it now because, as I said, it's been a while.

 

To the film's credit, though, I remember rather enjoying the smooth talking villainy of Morris Carnovsky (too bad, though, that George Macready hadn't been available).

 

This film, unlike Dark Passage, has Bogie in super cool form once again and you just know he will be triumphant. It doesn't have the romanticism of Dark Passage nor any signs of the vulnerability that Bogie has in the latter film. Once again in Dead Reckoning, as had been the case in Maltese Falcon, Bogart will not play the sap for a woman. In that respect and others, there's a certain tired familiarity about the material. Slick production values still make it a visually appealing production, though, and one worth seeing for Bogart fans.

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Well, NoraCharles, at least we're still discussing Bogart. And what a different Bogart it is in In A Lonely Place, as opposed to Dark Passage. Dixon Steele, in my opinion, is one of Bogie's most complex (and best) characterizations, with a great leading lady in Gloria Grahame and a strong, uncompromising ending.

 

I wonder how many women watching this film have recognized aspects of the Bogart character in someone they knew, and it scared the heck out of them.

 

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!

 

 

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> {quote:title=AddisonDeWitless wrote:}{quote}The Fountainhead has Reefer Madness beat when it comes to larfs, but I stress that is my personal taste.

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> Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Jun 16, 2013 7:47 PM

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> Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Jun 16, 2013 7:48 PM

> *Jack:* Oh, why don't you button up your lip? You're always squawkin' about something. You've got more static than a radio.

>

*Mae:* I wish you'd lay off those kids!

 

*Jack:* Oh, why don't you get over that "mother complex"?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Jimmy:* Let's go, Jack. I'm red-hot!

 

 

*Jack:* Better be careful how you drive, or the first thing you know you'll be ice cold.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Bureau Official:* Here is an example: A fifteen-year-old lad apprehended in the act of staging a holdup - fifteen years old and a marijuana addict. Here is a most tragic case.

 

 

*Dr. Carroll:* Yes. I remember. Just a young boy... under the influence of drugs... who killed his entire family with an axe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Bill:* Ya know after that session we had yesterday, I went home and told mother that the trouble with her pot roast gravy was that she hadn't added three heaping teaspoonfuls of olive oil.

 

 

*Mary:* What did she say?

 

 

*Bill:* She didn't say anything; she just threw me out of the kitchen.

 

 

*Mary:* Why, no wonder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Bill:* Gosh! Hot chocolate! Thanks, Mrs. Lane!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Ralph:* Mae? MAE!

 

 

 

 

 

*Mae:* What do you want?

 

 

*Ralph:* Bring me some reefers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Jimmy:* How about driving over to the... Joe's place with me? I'll buy you a soda!

 

 

*Bill:* I never drink the stuff!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Dr. Carroll:* I'm going to ask you a straightforward question: Isn't it true that you have, perhaps unwillingly, acquired a certain habit through association with certain undesirable people?

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Yeah, well, thanks be to providence that Raymond Massey's character in The Fountainhead didn't discover the mellowing effects of Marijuana, 'cause THEN Rand wouldn't have been able to use his poorly written caricature(among the many others) of an extremely uptight and overbearing executive as the catalyst to drive her overly simplified little philosophy of life!

 

And thus denying us the fun of laughing at not ONLY her poorly written and stilted dialogue, but ALSO the use of the archetypal to press her little agenda!

 

(...though I KNOW a few others around here will probably disagree with me here, and THAT'S certainly okay...Hey, it IS still a free country, ya know!!!)

 

ROFL

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>Dargo2 wrote: ..And thus denying us the fun of laughing at not ONLY her poorly written and stilted dialogue, but ALSO the use of the archetypal to press her little agenda

 

h4. Let's not forget the none too subtle symbolism.

2v2i0lh.png

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Ayn Rand was no feminist. I once read she could tell all

about a man by his feminine mate. She got that right.

 

 

 

Jake in the Heartland

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ROFL

 

THANK YOU, Jake...for giving us(or at least ME anyway, though I seriously doubt I'll be the only one here) yet ANOTHER reason to laugh at that confused woman!!!

 

ROFL

 

OMG (as the kids all say today in their texting on their little cellphones, 18 hours a day now), I "LOVED" how the woman RIGHT OFF dismissed the idea of ever voting for a woman POTUS solely because of her gender!

 

(...man.,.and here I ALREADY thought poor ol' Ayn was one confused individual...eeh, maybe I'm bein' just a little too hard on her here...I mean, she WAS pretty old there and maybe already well on her way to senility, eh?!!)

 

ROFL...STILL!!!!

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Okay, c'mon here, folks. What say we get back to talkin' about Bogie and Bacall here!

 

(...'cause all this talk about Ayn is givin' me a SIDE ACHE from LAUGHIN' so hard!!!)

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> {quote:title=Dargo2 wrote:}{quote}Okay, c'mon here, folks. What say we get back to talkin' about Bogie and Bacall here!

>

> (...'cause all this talk about Ayn is givin' me a SIDE ACHE from LAUGHIN' so hard!!!)

Now don't you go be dissin on my Little Orphan Aynie!

 

 

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see: this is what happens when someone brings up The Fountainhead. It's like that giant, uncontrollable Shake-a-Pudding monster in Sleeper. I feel like Woody Allen attempting to whack the fast-growing blob into submission with a broom in the background while everyone in the next room is having their erudite discussion in the fore.

 

For the record, I imdb'd Delmer Daves and was surprised that he- apparently- wrote Love Affair (at least per that site and wikipedia...I always thought that was a Leo McCarey work entirely) he wrote and directed Hollywood Canteen and Destination Tokyo- two big, big hits of the WWII era. He also directed 3:10 to Yuma, which *is* a terrific film, easily his best.

 

Other than that, the resume was kind of spotty, with a notable slide near the end with three teen-angst dramas in a row: Parrish, A Summer Place and Susan Slade.

 

It does look like he did a lot of movies that did big box office though. Dark Passage was his sixth film and the only one that looks to be an outright noir.

 

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> {quote:title=TomJH wrote:}{quote}Well, NoraCharles, at least we're still discussing Bogart. And what a different Bogart it is in In A Lonely Place, as opposed to Dark Passage. Dixon Steele, in my opinion, is one of Bogie's most complex (and best) characterizations, with a great leading lady in Gloria Grahame and a strong, uncompromising ending.

>

> I wonder how many women watching this film have recognized aspects of the Bogart character in someone they knew, and it scared the heck out of them.

Well, it's your thread, Tom, so as long as you're cool with it. :)

 

In a Lonely Place made a huge impression on me. Heartbreaking in so many ways, and, as you rightly note, it doesn't wimp out in the end. I too feel it's one of Bogart's best roles, and Gloria Grahame is excellent. What I found really disturbing as a viewer was how much I fell into the trap of wanting Laurel to somehow be able to save Dix from himself - even after it was clear that staying was not an option.

 

My understanding is that Bacall was considered for this movie too, but WB wouldn't cooperate. Interestingly, there was nearly as big an age gap between Grahame and Bogart as Bogie and Bacall (the ladies were born less than a year apart).

 

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=Dargo2 wrote:}{quote}Okay, c'mon here, folks. What say we get back to talkin' about Bogie and Bacall here!

>

> (...'cause all this talk about Ayn is givin' me a SIDE ACHE from LAUGHIN' so hard!!!)

Oh, but Rand-ism goes hand-in-hand with great love affairs like B&B (jump to about 1:50):

 

http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/423162/january-23-2013/tip-wag---montpelier-school-district--theatlasphere-com---florida-officials

 

Ayn was quite the charmer, eh? ;)

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Has this little nugget of useless trivia been mentioned yet? - the photo of Irene's father in the newspaper clipping Vincent sees is actually none other than Delmer Daves.

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That is interesting (and not useless). I think there are similarities between some of Daves's work and Hitchcock's. The film that precedes *Dark Passage* is *The Red House,* another strange, wonderful movie!

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> {quote:title=AddisonDeWitless wrote:}{quote}.

>

> Back to Dark Passage, I'm curious what those of you who like it think of Dead Reckoning (also 1947?) with Humphrey Bogart paired (for the only time?) with Lizabeth Scott. To me, it seems a companion piece to Dark Passage in that both seem at times presciently conscious of the fact that they are noirs well before (I think) the term was coined.

>

>

> It's a film I *loved* as a kid, but on re-watching it recently, found it to be almost a gentle send-up, bordering on parody of the whole noir genre- kind of conscious of its own movieness and willing to embrace the audacious aspects of its plot- which to me, makes it a sister film of sorts to Dark Passage.

>

I've seen *Dead Reckoning* several times, once I even stayed awake through the whole thing.

 

Arg, that was mean. I actually own the DVD, so can watch it any time. (It's on one of the noir boxed sets I have.)

I dunno, Addison, I can't really explain why, I'm just not keen on *Dead Reckoning*. (Hey, who says "keen" anymore? What is it about writing on this thread that makes me want to use retro expressions?)

Although, as I said, I've seen it a number of times (and was always awake through most of it, so altogether I'm pretty familiar with it) I've never been able to understand the plot. Now, agreed, almost all bona fide film noirs have complicated plots, and I usually don't fully comprehend them, and it doesn't matter.

But *Dead Reckoning* is really unfathomable.

Lizabeth Scott - my favourite L.S. role is "Toni" in *The Strange Love of Martha Ivers*. She was downright endearing in that ( she's not a "femme fatale" in it either, as I'm sure you can infer from my comment; how many femme fatales are "endearing"?)

But I'm not sure I care for either her character or her performance in *Dead Reckoning*. Bogart's ok in it, of course. His usual "tough guy just trying to figure out what's going on and set things right" persona.

I think the main reason I'm not crazy about *D.R.* is because there are too many interior scenes, not enough evocative rainy city streets. They're always hanging around in somebody's office. (Although, come to think of it, lots of noirs have their characters hanging around in offices.)

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*NoraCharles wrote about In a Lonely Place:* {font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}*Interestingly, there was nearly as big an age gap between Grahame and Bogart as Bogie and Bacall (the ladies were born less than a year apart).*

{font}

Gloria Grahame, though, seemed to have an older soul than Bacall, so I can't say that I was particularly aware of any strong age difference between her and Bogart (whereas with Bacall, although the age difference is more obvious, their screen chemistry triumphed over it). Grahame and Bogart had remarkable chemistry as well, of course.

 

{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}*What I found really disturbing as a viewer was how much I fell into the trap of wanting Laurel to somehow be able to save Dix from himself - even after it was clear that staying was not an option.*

 

And that's the trap that a lot of women have fallen into, trying to save/reform a bad boy, only to set themselves up for endless grief. That's why I wondered if a lot of women viewers could recognize traits of the Bogart character in a relationship of their own, and whether In a Lonely Place might strike home at little too much for them.

 

By the way, NoraCharles, thanks for providing the interesting piece of trivia about the newspaper photo of Vincent Perry pre-surgery in Dark Passage being director Delmer Daves. I guess when cabbie Tom D'Andrea comments to the plastic surgeon that he likes Perry's pre-Bogart face, it must have made Daves smile at little.

 

{font}images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR66ZoOkdDGFZCLILMUZzj{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif} {font}

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> {quote:title=TomJH wrote:}{quote}*NoraCharles wrote about In a Lonely Place:*

>

>

> By the way, NoraCharles, thanks for providing the interesting piece of trivia about the newspaper photo of Vincent Perry pre-surgery in Dark Passage being director Delmer Daves.

>

Actually, Nora pointed out that Daves' photo was used as the photo for Bacall's character's father in the newspaper article:

 

According to imdb.com:

"There is an 8x10 photo shown in the film of [Humphrey Bogart|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000007/]'s character before his face surgery. The actor's face in the photo is of character actor [Frank Wilcox|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0928207/]. "

 

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and also also,

 

not to get all "Sprocket Man" on everybody, but the protagonist's last name in Dark Passage is "Parry" not "Perry."

 

from dictionary.com:

 

*Parry:*

 

1.

to ward off (a thrust, stroke, weapon, etc.), as in fencing; avert.

2.

*to turn aside; evade or dodge:* to parry an embarrassing question.

verb (used without object)

3.

to parry a thrust, blow, etc.

noun

4.

an act or instance of parrying, as in fencing.

5.

a defensive [movement|http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/movement] in fencing.

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