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Bette Davis


classicfan66
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I've never seen it, but Bette Davis used the "What a dump!" line in the 1949 movie "Beyond the Forest."

 

Playwright Edward Albee probably made the line even more famous in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" when he has the character Martha imitate Davis saying it several times.

 

Edited by: jakeem on Jun 14, 2013 11:59 AM

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I've never seen that movie, Hibi. So I too, was unaware of it.

 

 

Up until now, I've labored under the belief that "What a dump!" was one of those legendary "non lines" like, "Play it again, Sam" and "Judy, Judy, Judy!"

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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Nope, Bette says it all right, with all the trademark Bette Davis style she's got. I can smugly say I've seen *Beyond the Forest*, although not for a long time.

Sorry to be smug, but it doesn' t happen very often that I've seen a movie that many others here have not.

 

Joseph Cotton's in it too. As I recall, it's pretty darn good. I know some critics think little of it -too melodramatic or slight or something - but I loved it.

 

 

Besides, it' s fun to say it, one hand on hip, when surveying some crummy place that deserves that epithet. (By the way, the "dump" she is referring to is an elegant beautifully furnished house.)

The other two super famous Bette Davis lines are "Why ask for the moon? We have the stars." and

"Fasten your seatbelts, friends, it's going to be a bumpy night."

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Bette was a very kind person in many ways. Mty friend Suzanne says that when her father died, Bette phoned her every week for months to be sure she and her brother were doing okay. She had formed a close relationship with her by the time of Bette's death.

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...too bad she was not a kind person towards her daughter or had a close relationship with her instead !

 

 

I saw her daughter once in an hour show. I don't blame Bette for a minute. She was a real pain, talking about how her mother had "sinned," and therefore she had cut off her connection with her. It's a good thing I wasn't there. I just wanted to smack her.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}The other two super famous Bette Davis lines are "Why ask for the moon? We have the stars." and "Fasten your seatbelts, friends, it's going to be a bumpy night."

 

 

 

Don't forget her famous line from "The Cabin in the Cotton" (1932): "I'd love to kiss you, but I just washed my hair."

 

She was delighted to repeat that one during her 1971 interview with Dick Cavett.

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> {quote:title=Dothery wrote:}{quote}...too bad she was not a kind person towards her daughter or had a close relationship with her instead !

>

> I saw her daughter once in an hour show. I don't blame Bette for a minute. She was a real pain, talking about how her mother had "sinned," and therefore she had cut off her connection with her. It's a good thing I wasn't there. I just wanted to smack her.

>

What I've seen of B.D. in documentaries is a judgmental, "the Antichrist-is-a-homosexual" zealot. I can believe that Bette was an imperfect mother (to be charitable). Her relationships with the men in her life were unstable, and she probably did treat her daughter as more of a companion than as a child. But to cash in on a tell-all about an elderly and ailing parent is just . . . uhhh . . *cringe.* If I remember correctly, both ex-hubby Gary Merrill (Bill Sampson :x ) and their son came to Davis's defense.

 

Back on topic - hope Beyond the Forest can escape from legal limbo someday and reach our TV screens. I have no idea what I'll think of the movie, but I'd love to hear for myself that iconic line delivered at least once! :D

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Dothery, what did Bette's daughter MEAN when she said her mother "Had sinned"? That's a very general and ambiguous term.

 

 

No idea. She came across as a religious extremist. I couldn't make head nor tail of what she was talking about. I don't remember her pinning it down to any one thing; just that Bette had "sinned," that was all. That was enough to make her sever relations with her. I have a feeling she didn't go along with B.D.'s way-out born-again views. She was a very strange woman. She reminded me of the Red Queen ... "Off with their heads!"

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Not to go all **** retentive, but there is no friends in the

bumpy ride quote, not that Bette/Margo didn't have friends

in that flick.

 

 

The best time I ever had with Joan Crawford was when I pushed

her down the stairs in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?

 

Bette Davis. You go, girl. :D

 

 

 

 

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I had a feeling I might have been wrong about the "friends" bit in that famous line. But I think I like it better that way. I say, the line should read the way I thought it did.

Hey ,what does Joseph Mankiewicz's writing have on misswonderly's? (don't answer that.)

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I read B.D.'s book after it came out. It was written after she found the Lord and to set Bette straight (as if Bette was going to change her ways by that point being an old and sick lady). It was Bette mostly being Bette. I've no doubt a lot of it was probably true, but it wasnt in the realm of Mommy Dearest. Mostly Bette acting like the diva she was (fueled by alcohol) and mother-in-law from hell. I did laugh a lot because parts were funny, but it was such a mean spirited book and written by someone who was so holier than thou...Bette did a lot for B.D. in life despite her shortcomings ....

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Good post Hibi, :) Agree with you. When it comes to these tell all books, you really can't believe everything you read, especially when there's an agenda of money, revenge or publicity involved. I feel the same way about Mommie Dearest. Some reliable sources have said that there's a lot of truth in the book, other reliable sources say not. Either way, most likely there's some exageration.

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I admit I'm cynical about people with little to no talent that write books about successfull family members. These books have to have 'juice' otherwise no publisher would want to print them. This leads the author to exagerate. To what extent? Well only those involved know.

 

 

 

 

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