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misswonderly3
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I doubt I have anything insightful to add to this thread, but I just wanted to add my voice to the throng expressing my displeasure of the erosion of good behavior at the movies over the course of my time on this planet. It's to the point now, of course, where the theaters themselves feel obliged to run "No talking/texting" messages prior to the films. This is clearly not working as a deterrent, but whatever the next, better step is no one seems to have figured out yet. I think as a greater percentage of films are watched on impressive home entertainment systems, people have forgotten or are so young they have grown up never knowing that once there was a distinction between how one behaved in a public theater and in one's living room.

 

I agree with the idea of attempting to attend more matinees. Other suggestions I have are to not see the latest blockbuster the weekend of its release but instead only after it's been out a month or more, when it's audience size will be drastically reduced. And your choice of film will probably also help. People will less likely be talking and texting at BEFORE MIDNIGHT than MAN OF STEEL.

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I find that opening day matinees are sparsely attended, so I rarely have a problem with noisy people in them. I like to see films on the biggest screen available. If you wait too long, the film you want to see will be in a smaller theater, with a smaller screen. I guess everyone is doing digital projection these days, but when showing an actual film, it's best to go soon after the opening, before there is much print damage.

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>SansFin wrote:

>>Jet airplanes made it possible for normal people to become exposed in great numbers to the French who have never had any manners and these travelers were influenced by them.

>>

>>Jet airplanes also made it possible for normal people to have contact with Belgians and we all know where that leads.

h4. Masterfully done!

h5. it is almost as if you were Canadian...

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> {quote:title=sewhite2000 wrote:}{quote}I doubt I have anything insightful to add to this thread, but I just wanted to add my voice to the throng expressing my displeasure of the erosion of good behavior at the movies over the course of my time on this planet. It's to the point now, of course, where the theaters themselves feel obliged to run "No talking/texting" messages prior to the films. This is clearly not working as a deterrent, but whatever the next, better step is no one seems to have figured out yet. ...

>

Well, sewhite, as a matter of fact, I actually did come up with a proposed solution to this problem once, but it didn't go down so well when I suggested it here on these boards. I still think it's a good idea.

However, "we won't go there"... :|

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I have heard much of the zero tolerance policy of Alamo Drafthouse. The Wikipedia entry states:

"The cinema also prohibits talking and texting during the film. Anyone who violates this policy is subject to warning and potential removal from the premises."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alamo_Drafthouse_Cinema

 

There are customers who do not appreciate such constraints. The policy received much media attention when Alamo Drafthouse posted onto YouTube a customer's voicemail rant in response to her ejection I will not post a link to the video as it contains profuse profanity. I like very much that she states that she will not return and the video closes with the company response which is: "Thanks for not coming back to the Alamo, Texter!"

 

It is sad to say there is no facility near me and I have no immediate plans to travel to such areas but I would go to one because I appreciate their efforts on behalf of civility.

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That's why I try to go to the picture show during weekday afternoons,

when there are fewer patrons and thus less jibber jabber of various

kinds. The loudest noise is usually some old timer falling asleep and

snoring for a few minutes.

 

I also go to matinees in order to avoid the jabberers, but after suffering through the earsplitting sound level in the "upcoming attractions" I almost find myself yearning for some cellphone yakkers to come along and give the amplifiers a bit of competition.

 

For a crypto Nazi, Bill (just kiddin, don't have a from beyond the grave

hissy fit there W.F.) wasn't such a bad guy. But despite all his urbanity,

intelligence, and wit, or maybe due to it, Buckley was a bit of a snob,

so it's not very surprising that he would use an insult like that which

really doesn't address the specifics of the argument, but just makes

fun of his opponent.

 

My favorite Buckleyism: *"He has all of the attributes of a dog, except loyalty."*

 

I read Will's column on occasion and he's a very prolific name dropper of

figures from history, literature, sports, etc. I can imagine Will having a

rolodex on his desk where the names are rotated on some schedule.

Let's see, last mentioned Plato in 2011, time to do so again. I haven't

followed Pat Buchanan in a while and I know he can get way out there

sometimes, but Pat always knew his history and politics better than most

columnists did, and he had a good sense of humor too.

 

 

Pat Buchanan, nativist atrocity that he may be, has more sense of humor in his little finger than Will has in his entire body. Most of Will's quotes used to come from an old book store customer of mine, a fellow named Timothy Dickinson, who was a walking encylopedia and walking Bartlett's, in addition to being able to name the Popes in revervse chronological order and tell you the day of the week for any event in history, always with the reigning calendar in mind. At one point he was so well known for his relationship to Will that Garry Trudeau ran a parody of him in Doonesbury.

 

 

OTOH on the day after Clinton's 1996 re-election, Buchanan came into my shop about a minute after it opened, and in reference to his infamous convention speech of 1992, broke out in a huge grin and simply said, *"Well, they can't blame this one on me!"* I couldn't imagine Will coming out with a line like that in a million years.

 

 

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Those explosions can get pretty loud. I would gladly pay extra

to not have to sit through four trailers, maybe just one for old

time's sake. The local movie theater includes the trailers in the

running time of the movie, so you know you'll be bothered for

ten minutes. Thanks a lot.

 

 

I haven't kept up with Pat, and I know some of his views on certain

subjects are pretty deplorable, but compared to other folks in his

field, he is very knowledegable on matters historical and political, and

he has a great sense of humor, though on occasion he can get a

little cranky. I remember the time he was running for president, criti-

cizing foregin imports and riding around in a Mercedes. Oh Pat.

 

I've always though that Will was fairly literate, but dropping two or three

fairly obscure references in a column points to a heavy reliance on some

kind of reference book or person. It's just a bit too much.

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I don't mind wit, as I don't mind anyone with self esteem.

 

 

Buckley had wit. Buchanan has wit to some acceptable degree. I'm STILL waiting for Limbaugh and Coulter to show me the OTHER half of THEIRS.

 

 

As I said, I don't mind anyone with a sense of self esteem, but it appears that too many people confuse "self esteem" with "self centeredness" these days.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}

> Also, try going to really lousy, unpopular pictures. The crowds tend to be smaller, and there is less chance of distraction from rude people.

 

This reminds me of George S. Kaufman's comment: "Beware of flu. Avoid crowds. See Someone in the House "

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But some lousy pictures are popular, while some unpopular pictures are

good. I'll stick with the matinees when possible.

 

A little off topic, but Cinemoi has finally broken down the barriers, those

black stripes at the edges. When it was the old ratio, all four sides were

like that, widescreen just the top and bottom, very annoying, as was the

channel logo which was there in the corner during the entire movie. Thank

goodness it's over. :D

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Years ago I read a lengthy article in The New Yorker written by Buckley

that was about a more or less typical week or two in his private life. The

piece was hilarious. It read like the life of an upper class twit, American

style. His housekeeper had to prepare a sandwich just right so that Bill

could eat it. No satirist could have produced a funnier piece if they had

tried. That doesn't diminish his intelligence or wit, but it does mean he

came from a very rarefied position in society and it's hard not to remember

that when considering his politics.

 

Limbaugh and Coulter may be deficient in the wit department, but they're

still as funny as hell. ]:)

 

 

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Oh, gosh. Movies. Let's see: I used to go to the drive-ins when I lived in San Diego. Lots of fun, no worry about being bothered by ill-mannered people, lots to eat, bring your own if you wanted. Put the kids in their PJs and off you went. Loved it.

 

Kids grew up, I moved away to Hawaii; went to the movies in Kona; no problems with talkers or stiffish ushers or anything like it. Just comfortable watching, pleasant people.

 

Went to Maine with my new husband to run our B&B. No movies near us, so we didn't go to them.

 

Came back to Hawaii after he died, no movies near me here. I know there are such things, and I get them from Netflix or watch them on TCM. That's about it. I understand The Great Gatsby is somewhere around and I want to see it because Amitabh Bachchan is in it. Maybe when I go over to Hilo tomorrow I'll find it somewhere. Who knows? If not, sooner or later Netflix will have it.

 

 

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>the demise of American manners began with: Howdy Doody

...or TV

...or cel phones

 

As we all know the complaint of "youth out of hand" has been going on for hundreds of years. I'd guess one reason is because manners are a refinement of age and experience for most.

 

It takes a long time for a child to realize they are not the center of the universe and even longer to realize their role in society means respecting others.

 

I am extremely dismayed at what I call "The Infantilization of US Society" where youth is so glorified, adults simply refuse to grow up. You've all seen the results: grown men who live in their parent's basements at 40 because they spend every penny earned "gaming", the 30 year old wearing cartoon animal head hats & mitten sets and the constant nattering (like a teen) on their cel phones.

 

The constant nattering or texting in movie theaters (or restaurants/stores/etc) just illustrates the utter self centeredness many people accept as their "right". They simply do not understand or care about anyone else besides themselves, just like 5 years olds.

 

I've observed erratic outlandish behaviour by fully grown adults that just crave attention from the crowd, anyone....LOOK AT *ME!* Just like people driving-taking up two lanes, turning in front of others, speeding....GET OUT OF *MY* WAY! It's all about ME.

 

That's what I see as the social deterioration, the inability to comprehend "society". Cel phones and texting just reinforce that idea.

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> {quote:title=Mr.Froy wrote:}{quote}Years ago I read a lengthy article in The New Yorker written by Buckley

> that was about a more or less typical week or two in his private life. The

> piece was hilarious. It read like the life of an upper class twit, American

> style. His housekeeper had to prepare a sandwich just right so that Bill

> could eat it. No satirist could have produced a funnier piece if they had

> tried. That doesn't diminish his intelligence or wit, but it does mean he

> came from a very rarefied position in society and it's hard not to remember

> that when considering his politics.

>

> Limbaugh and Coulter may be deficient in the wit department, but they're

> still as funny as hell. ]:)

Sure, when they can get their scripts written for them and hide behind a wall of flunkies who can screen their phone calls and cut off anyone who's embarrassing them. When was the last time you saw Rush in a setting he didn't control?

 

Think about it: Can you even imagine either Limbaugh or Coulter hosting a show like Firing Line for 33 years? Those two couldn't make a show like that last for 33 minutes.

 

 

 

 

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Ha! the demise of American manners began with Howdy Doody?

 

It started earlier than that; in the colonies, when a group of young upstarts with support from some old codgers, told the benevolent powers in England they wanted to govern themselves, And, while we think we showed good manners, the British crown took umbrage.

 

Outside of that, I blame Prohibition, and for that I am truly sorry Minnesota sent GOP Volstead to Congress,

 

Edited by: casablancalover2 on Jun 18, 2013 8:21 AM

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> {quote:title=casablancalover2 wrote:}{quote}

> it is almost as if you were Canadian...

 

I am very sorry to have taken so long to reply but I have been trying very hard to work out if you meant that as a compliment or as a tongue-in-cheek insult.

 

:)

 

It is typical in American movies to portray the French as rude and the Germans as militant and the Italians as insincere but I am wondering if there is a bias to show Canadians as overtly polite. I am sorry to say that I can think of no movie in which a character is prominently Canadian.

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> {quote:title=TikiSoo wrote:}{quote}

> It takes a long time for a child to realize they are not the center of the universe and even longer to realize their role in society means respecting others.

 

It is odd coincidence that I am now reading of youth because I am helping Capuchin in research of 1323. Boys of age seven worked and could be hung for theft. They served on juries at twelve, married at fourteen and served in an army at fifteen. It was common to find widows of age twenty-three with six children. It was twenty years later only that command of a battalion in war was given to a boy of age sixteen.

 

That was a time of youth! :)

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I thought Levant smoked to take the edge off all the PILLS!

 

 

Anyway, much CAN be said about how parents treat their kids as if they're something special. I did, too. But I at least put in the effort to get across to them that it was only ME and MOM that thought so. GRANDMA'S and GRANDPA'S too. And maybe a few close others. But once they go out the front door, the REST of the world didn't GIVE a S**T! So they needed to act accordingly. They would have to SHOW them WHY they think they're "special", rather than expect them to think so.

 

 

But it's not going to get any better. After all, didn't WE learn manners(those of us who HAVE them) from OUR parents? And as more kids are being brought up WITHOUT them, WHO'S going to teach future generations?

 

 

OY!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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>It is typical in American movies to portray the French as rude and the Germans as militant and the Italians as insincere but I am wondering if there is a bias to show Canadians as overtly polite. I am sorry to say that I can think of no movie in which a character is prominently Canadian.

 

Man, you folks around here are REALLY reminding me of some classic comedy routines today!!!.....

 

 

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> {quote:title=SansFin wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=casablancalover2 wrote:}{quote}

> > it is almost as if you were Canadian... I am very sorry to have taken so long to reply but I have been trying very hard to work out if you meant that as a compliment or as a tongue-in-cheek insult.:)

>

>

>

>

> It is typical in American movies to portray the French as rude and the Germans as militant and the Italians as insincere but I am wondering if there is a bias to show Canadians as overtly polite. I am sorry to say that I can think of no movie in which a character is prominently Canadian.

>

Hmm, at the risk of coming across all poe-faced and "offended", I have to wonder why being taken as a Canadian would in any way be an insult. A compliment, of course.

 

There are quite a few old movies in which the main character is Canadian, but usually their "Canadian-ness" does not play into the story in any way, except maybe to signify a kind of neutrality to them ( Canadians being, especially in those days, considered to be inoffensive and low risk.)

 

 

The Mary Astor character in *Across the Pacific* was Canadian. Well, not really, she was pretending, something Aster seemed to specialize in around that time (reference the recent discussion on *The Maltese Falcon* .) Astor's character claimed she was from some small town in Saskatchewan (or maybe Alberta, in any case, somewhere regarded as wholesome and dull...)

 

 

I'm pretty sure a few noir characters were supposed to be Canadian. Dick Powell in *Cornered* ?

 

 

Dana Andrews' character - and possibly LInda Darnell's ? - in *Zero Hour*.

 

And of course, Robert Donat ("Richard Hanney" ) in *The 39 Steps*.

 

 

This is not to mention all the lead Canadian characters there are in Canadian movies.

 

 

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