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What are the rules of the modern Movie Censorship Code?


FredCDobbs
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Ummm...yes Fred, but ironically I believe another present "rule" in order to share the high costs of movie production now days is that there must be a minimum of at least three product placements shown within each and every movie made today.

 

(...though no tobacco products, of course)

 

LOL

 

;)

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}That would be an economic "trend" in films, but not a Rule of the Code. Rules of the Code would be something someone can't do or say in a film because it is offensive to the people who control the Code.

Exactly, just as the slang word J_ _ was edited out of "They All Kissed The Bride." it seems today that code even reaches back to films from the past. Good point, Fred.

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But, in THAT one, Uma was the girl of a CRIME figure. There is cigarette smoking in movies still, but if you notice, all who partake are outside the law, or if not, just creepy, jerkwad characters to begin with.

 

 

Disciplining children seems to have fallen out of favor. Whether a comedy or not, most kids get away with murder in movies these days. They are snarky, snotty BRATS who would have found it painful to sit down in MY house!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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>Disciplining children seems to have fallen out of favor. Whether a comedy or not, most kids get away with murder in movies these days. They are snarky, snotty BRATS who would have found it painful to sit down in MY house!

 

Oh suuuure. And THIS comin' from the same guy who just 10 minutes ago confessed in another thread that he used to sneak into his old man's bedroom lookin' for his stash of porno when HE was a kid!!!!

 

ROFL

 

;)

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When you pick yourself up from the floor, Dargo, look back and find the operative word, "sneak" in that post. We KNEW what we were in for if caught. However, the backsass and snotty attitude displayed by many kids in today's movies NEVER went over well in MY real life.

 

 

To wit, I think I mentioned this before, but a friend of mine was once handing down sentence on his son, who was 13 at the time, and the son whined, "I didn't ASK to be born!"

 

 

Now, my dental work would have been loosened quickly had I ever blurted out that nonsense. But comps to my buddy, who shot back, "We didn't ask for you to be born either. We were hoping for a GIRL!"

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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>Disciplining children seems to have fallen out of favor. Whether a comedy or not, most kids get away with murder in movies these days. They are snarky, snotty BRATS

 

Yes, and I've noticed that in most sitcoms on TV today, involving kids and teenagers, most of the jokes are about the kids insulting one another with snarky remarks. Even on the two Disney channels.

 

And some of the programs have a laugh track, as if these rude remarks are supposed to be funny.

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>Now, my dental work would have been loosened quickly had I ever blurted out that nonsense. But comps to my buddy, who shot back, "We didn't ask for you to be born either. We were hoping for a GIRL!"

 

LOL

 

Funny retort there, but your story here has reminded me of how I once got my Pop to instantaneously go from bein' very angry with me to laughin' it up.

 

I can't quite remember what he caught me doing that he found objectionable, but Pop would often start his lectures to me "post-gettin' caught" with the phrase, "Let me fill you in on a little secret here!".

 

Well, like I said, he caught me doin' somethin' or maybe sayin' somethin' he didn't care for, and just as he began to say, "Let me...", I said, "Oh great, here comes ANOTHER 'little secret' I'm supposed to remember now, HUH?!"

 

(...though as they say, "Comedy is often just a matter of Timing", and so my "timing" must have been pretty good that day, 'cause Pop wouldn't have usually reacted by laughing it off...OR of course it COULD just have been that what I did or said wasn't that big a deal anyway)

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I see nothing wrong with kids seeing adults smoking on the big screen any more than them seeing adults BOOZE IT UP on the big screen.

 

 

 

I just don't think it's THEIR resposibility to keep YOUR kids from smoking. It's YOURS! I know many people who've NEVER took up the habit who were raised in times when SEEING it in movies and television was commonplace. And I now know a LOT of young people who smoke who've NEVER seen much of it in movies and TV, and who's PARENTS don't smoke.

 

 

 

 

Now, as a smoker( NO lectures, please!), I would resent ANYone who would insist that I abstain from smoking in front of their kids( unless, of course, if it was in THEIR house. They have a perfect right, then) in an effort to keep them from being "exposed" to it. Using ignorance as a tool for child rearing is never a good idea. My usual response to that is to remind them that I ALREADY raised MY kids, and ask them PLEASE don't insist I raise THEIRS as well.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Edited by: Sepiatone on Jun 17, 2013 7:02 PM

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I used to hear about the "peer pressure" concept way back in the 1950s, but I don't recall having any peer pressure, because I was pretty much of a loner. I mean, I did my own thing. I was me, not part of any club other than just being in the same school grade as other people my age.

 

I think what influenced me the most was the movies. Rock and roll films, hoodlum films, cowboy films, adventure films, etc. In fact, my main "image" I wanted to have looked just like Stewart Granger's outfit in KING SOLOMON'S MINES (1950).

 

I assembled various safari outfits from military surplus clothes, and I was really pleased when I found a safari type jacket from some British or Australian military unit.

 

I was delighted in the 1980s when the Banana Republic opened up safari clothing stores in the wake of the success of the film OUT OF AFRICA. I've still got my official Banana Republic safari suit. :) The jacket is cotton canvas and has four large pockets in front and a belt. Safara hats became popular in the 1980s too. Brim turned down all the way around, including the front and back. :)

 

There was no "peer" in any of my schools who dressed like that. :)

 

Safari jacket from MOGAMBO:

 

http://chicvintagebrides.com/wp-content/upLoads/2013/04/9-Annex-Kelly-Grace-Mogambo_NRFPT_01.jpg

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>I used to hear about the "peer pressure" concept way back in the 1950s, but I don't recall having any peer pressure, because I was pretty much of a loner. I mean, I did my own thing. I was me, not part of any club other than just being in the same school grade as other people my age. I think what influenced me the most was the movies. Rock and roll films, hoodlum films, cowboy films, adventure films, etc. In fact, my main "image" I wanted to have looked just like Stewart Granger's outfit in KING SOLOMON'S MINES (1950).

 

Hey Fred, are you SURE what influenced you the most WASN'T Stewart Granger, but was IN FACT Groucho and HIS famous personal rule of: "I refuse to join any club that would have me as a member!" ???

 

(...'cause THAT was always MY philosophy TOO!) ;)

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I guess I turned out to follow the Groucho rule without thinking about it. I guess maybe 1 person out of maybe 10,000 does that. And that produces guys like you and me. :) And of course, you and I can't join each other's club. :)

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I'm changing the title of this thread to read "the modern UNWRITTEN Movie Censorship Code" because this code is just followed by Hollywood movie makers but it is not written down. Its rules are discussed at Hollywood board meetings, Hollywood parties, and in studio executive offices, but it is not written down, because the main rule of the Modern Code is to pretend there is no Modern Code.

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