Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Johnny Carson?


Recommended Posts

TCM conveniently continues to ignore what the motion picture industry has degraded into after 40 years of a predominantly progressive point of view. The fruits: cgi with no drama, cel animation dead as an artform, no movies with any story, substance or history just hyper-kinetic action sequences tied together with no descernable intelligence, a now totally transfixed attention on our youngest demographic to the exclusion of most everyone else's tastes and anyone else at all for that matter. And through it all TCM continues to ignore what has and is happening out there choosing rather to wallow in a relentless pomp of Hollywood's glory days which are now long past. Tonite, TCM slouches back to Johnny Carson. *"What does it all mean?" -Mills (Richard Harris), Mutiny on the Bounty*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While I know you love to complain about TCM I'm having a real hard time figuring out what your latest complaint is all about.

 

TCM is a brand. The focus of this brand is on studio era movies. i.e. mostly American movies made from the 1930's to 1968. (note I say mostly).

 

The Carson special (covered in today's LA Times BTW), features mostly studio era actors that appeared on Carson's show. (note I say mostly since they are showing Drew Barrymore when she was a little girl).

 

So yea TCM mostly ignores current cinema trends. But should I complain that rap, pop or rock music stations don't feature jazz? NO, since that would be folly since jazz is not part of their brand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the Carson idea is a great one (I felt that was implied but maybe not). It is similar to an idea that was being kicked around in the 'old TV shows' thread; Have TCM show old TV shows that featured studio era movie stars. While this was a great idea it would be difficult for TCM to only get those episodes that featured studio era stars. But with Carson that is mostly what TCM did.

 

On a side note in the Times article Carson said that the media these old shows were on 'should be used to make guitar picks'. While I can always use more picks I'm glad that didn't happen!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think its great that TCM has obtained the rights to air these Carson interviews. There are other talk show interviews from years past that may be tracked down , like from Phil Donahue, Merv Griffin, Tom Snyder, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With programming like this, they do run the risk of becoming more Turner Classic Television instead of Turner Classic Movies.

 

But this channel does such a good job-- on a consistent basis-- bringing classic film to audiences, that I am not complaining. And who doesn't love Johnny Carson...?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>Right. I've mentioned before that I think the "What's My LIne" shows from the '50s and '60s, with their movie star mystery guests, would have a place on TCM, especially since they are no longer being regularly shown on the Game Show Network.

 

I like the general idea here, finance, because as you probably remember a while back I mentioned to you I too was hooked on "What 's My Line" a few years go when GSN was showing it.

 

However, I would have just one addition suggestion about that here....

 

As with these showings of Carson's interviews and with them edited to just present that part of his old programs, I would think it would be great to maybe just show the final portion of "WML" with the "Mystery Guests" as a replacement for some of the "filler shorts" between movies, and if possible showcasing the specific"Mystery Guest" between the movies said "Mystery Guest" would be starring in.

 

(...I mean, aren't we all pretty much tired of watching "Joe McDoakes gettin' caught behind that dumb ol' 8-Ball", or "Talking monkeys dressed up as cowboys and riding dogs", OR listening to "James A. Fitzpatrick mispronouncing the name of a certain large metropolitan city located in Southern California as "Los Angle-less", by now???!!!

 

LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am so glad TCM is showing Johnny Carson shows. Good choice! I miss Johnny! He had good guests too, I remember James Stewart came on once right after his African trip. He was funny :DI also think What's My Line is another good show. Very entertaining! Maybe TCM wil show it too?

 

Edited by: matey on Jul 1, 2013 8:07 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> While this was a great idea it would be difficult for TCM to only get those episodes that featured studio era stars. But with Carson that is mostly what TCM did.

 

I think the fact that Carson's estate owns the rights to the post-1972 Carson era *Tonight Show* and that estate has properly archived those assets (not only in the preservation but creating an extensive database so they know what they have) made it easier for TCM to choose which interviews they wanted.

 

Also, the format of the Carson-era *Tonight Show* was tailor made for the way that TCM is showcasing them.

 

Johnny's nephew, who is in charge of the Carson Archive, gets major props for caring for those assets in such a professional manner and making them available not only for TCM and others but the general public as well. (There is a YouTube channel, DVD box sets, etc).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=FlyBackTransformer wrote:}{quote}TCM conveniently continues to ignore what the motion picture industry has degraded into after 40 years of a predominantly progressive point of view. The fruits: cgi with no drama, cel animation dead as an artform, no movies with any story, substance or history just hyper-kinetic action sequences tied together with no descernable intelligence, a now totally transfixed attention on our youngest demographic to the exclusion of most everyone else's tastes and anyone else at all for that matter.

.

 

The film industry has been, is and will continue to be driven by profit margins. Only when pressure is put on it do you see any changes. Youngsters actually support the films they want to see and more are produced. If people like the original poster would support good dramas we would see more of those too.

 

I don't know too many filmmakers who produce films for free. And those that do don't last too long. Dramas are being produced all the time. Here and all over the world. But, you have to get off of your duff and support them. Find what theater is showing them and buy a ticket. Attend a festival. Get involved.

 

Sitting and whining has never accomplished much .

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Yeah James, the actors that appear on Johnny Carson also appear in a lot of movies that are shown on TCM, so therefore, it ties in with TCM perfectly I think.

 

 

It was interesting to see George Burns tonight and to hear him talk about Al Jolson and Jack Benny, all from first hand experience. We are fortunate to be able to see these shows.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have to remember. Part of what made these films and this era so special was the studios promoting the films, the stars and the whole glamour of it all. Appearing on Johnny Carson was part of that.

 

Who didn't make sure to stay up and watch their favorite star do an interview ? That was part of the process. And you get to see them when they were alive and vibrant. I like that this channel doesn't remain static and continues to evolve coming up with new ideas and ways to present the films.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=matey wrote:}{quote}I also think What's My Line is another good show. Very entertaining! Maybe TCM wil show it too?

>

> Edited by: matey on Jul 1, 2013 8:07 PM

.

 

How about Turner and their various channels buy some ads on GSN then they would get back to showing them there ? It serves much of the same audience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FlyBack, you certainly sound angry and passionate, but I find your arguments confusing. Okay, so you think everything Hollywood has done in the last 40 years sucks, and ... um ... you hate TCM for ignoring that it sucks? "TCM chooses to ignore what ... is happening out there, choosing rather to wallow in a relentless pomp of Hollywood's glory days." At first, I thought you were yet another of the endless legion of posters around here who think TCM airs too many newer movies, but the more carefullly I read your post, that doesn't seem to be what you're saying. But frankly, I don't really understand what you ARE saying, or what you want TCM to do. I think you're saying you want the show hosts to come on every night and say newer movies suck and stop celebrating the past, which is sort of the whole point of the channel. That would make for a weird station.

 

I enjoyed the Carson interviews very much, though I had a couple of caveats: I thought they would be "uncut and uninterrupted", but we're clearly only seeing edited portions of them. The first and biggest guest of the night would get two segments, typically, so some of these interviews are being severely edited where I suspect we're even seeing half of their total length. Since I have no idea what's in all the content that's being left out, I have to trust the editors are leaving in the stuff TCM viewers will find most relevant.

 

Also, I was sort of weirded out that I guess because this material is controlled by the Carson estate, they are making sure they're all about Johnny to the point that Ed MacMahon, while once heard laughing, is never SEEN in any of these interviews. I found that really bizarre. I have to wonder what's going on behind the scenes, if there was some kind of falling out between the two estates, or the Carson estate is cheap and doesn't want to pay the MacMahon estate anything and just cut him out altogether. Maybe it's just the way things randomly fell out this first night, but if we go through this entire month, and Ed is never once shown on camera, then I'll have to assume there's some legal or financial reason for completely editing out his visual presence. I'm a little distressed at this relentless editing to present Johnny and his guest in a vacuum. At one point during the Kirk Douglas interview, we hear, but don't see, Johnny's producer, Fred de Cordova, who lets us know his autobiography isn't in the Top 10 like Douglas'. Also, during the Neil Simon interview, we hear a female guest tell Neil Simon that he could write for television if he wanted to, but we don't see who that guest was. I would have liked to have known.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Johnny Carson remains for me the model talk show host against which all others will be measured and probably found to be wanting. With Carson's retirement I essentially stopped watching late night television so others (if they remember Carson, of course) are better prepared than myself to make that comparison. Of course, I have seen Leno and Letterman but while they're both okay, I nostalgically still miss Carson.

 

I'm grateful to TCM for giving its viewers (including those who never saw Carson before) an opportunity to see a little bit of that late night magic that once existed on the Tonight Show. (To be fair, though, it would be great to see Carson bouncing off Ed McMahon and Doc Severinsen, once again, as well).

 

Carson really had it all as a host. He could be gracious and charming and he could also be hilariously funny (as a master of comedy timing, no one could milk an unexpected humorous situation quite like Johnny). Carson was clearly highly intelligent and well read or, at least, informed, but he also had, for all the sophistication of his presentation, a small Nebraska boy charm. Carson came across as GENUINE!!!!

 

 

While there is no way to fit it into TCM's movie mandate, how I wish they could show lengthy clips of Carson when he interacted with animals brought on the show from the San Diego Zoo (the beautiful Joan Embery, do you remember?). He had as much rapport with the four legged kind as he did the two legged, and knew how to milk those encounters with animals for maximum comedic effect, at times, as well.

 

 

Here's a YouTube link, all too brief, of Johnny with a few of the animals (four legged variety) that appeared on his show:

 

 

 

 

 

Johnny Carson was also very special to me for a personal reason. After my father's very sudden death (he was 51), my mother couldn't get to sleep and we stayed up together for months watching the Tonight Show, which neither of us had really seen before.

 

 

About three months after Dad's death one night Carson said or did something that made my mother laugh. But I mean she LAUGHED! She laughed loud and she laughed long. It was almost like a dam bursting. It was, in fact, the first time I had heard her laugh since Dad died. I will always be very grateful to Johnny Carson for that special moment when he helped my mother to discover that there was still laughter within her.

 

 

When Johnny Carson retired I felt as if a death had occured because I was afraid that I would never see this old "friend" again. As it turned out, I was right. But thanks to TCM I can revisit this friend, with much the same nostalgia, I suppose, as seeing him in a home movie.

 

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTssZzu4ZioyKvR0apvh-v

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am going to give the Carson on TCM series a thumbs down. I certainly like(d) Carson and remember watching his last episode in 1992. And I understand that many others reading this thread are very happy to see these segments on TCM. But...

 

This is my opinion, of course, but they seem out of place. They should be on TVLand (TVLand's loss is TCM's gain). Someone else suggested that TCM should start airing old game shows. No to that, thank you. The next thing we will have people trying to get unsold pilots on TCM because Bette Davis made a failed attempt at a series, and after all, she's a classic movie star and we should see all her work on TCM. And after that, we will get folks suggesting that TCM show old commercials-- certainly, there must be a place for those old Jane Withers ads as Josephine the plumber. Right? Not on TCM. This is a movie channel.

 

I even thought the 'Screen Directors Playhouse' episodes were out of place on TCM.

 

Now I am all for classic TV movies that feature classic film stars in juicy roles, if the telefilms are of decent quality and could easily have been released in theatres, even as a B film. Those are constructed as movies and could fit in on TCM. But not variety show segments, game shows or commercials.

 

The other 'issue' I have with the Carson segments is that TCM's programmers have selected stars whose movies do not really play on TCM. How often does a Mary Tyler Moore film air on this channel? Not often. And except for SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT, almost all of Burt Reynolds' films do not air on TCM (he is featured in the promos for Carson on TCM).

 

Then, we get to Drew Barrymore. I love Drew, what a talent, honestly. But little Heather O'Rourke's POLTERGEIST is in frequent rotation on TCM, and few, if none, of Drew's films ever show up (I am referring to Drew's child star roles from the same era as O'Rourke).

 

Besides, we already have the Dick Cavett interviews. Do we really need Carson and Merv Griffin and Dinah Shore on TCM? Some folks say yes, yes, yes. But I respectfully say, thanks but no thanks, I will watch SABRINA on Instant Netflix. I want a classic movie, please.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have mixed feelings as well about it. I did watch most of the interviews last night (werent all that great). I skipped Neil Simon. Drew was cute and I'm sure that was done due to her appearing on The Essentials. But like you said, what does Mary Tyler Moore have to do with classic movies? (she hadnt even appeared in Ordinary People by that point). I will probably watch a few more (Bette definitely) but I question why TCM is even runnning this........(am sure its a financial decision)......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...