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Truffaut


slaytonf
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The films of Francois Truffaut will be featured on TCM's Friday Night Spotlight.

 

It is difficult to overstate the importance of Francois Truffaut on filmmaking. Much like Charley Parker was to jazz, he was pivotal, along with other members of the New Wave, in breaking the conventions and empty formulas that dominated movies of the time. Paradoxically, he and the others drew a lot of their inspiration from that font of convention, Hollywood. Unlike other of the New Wavers, who were either pedantic, philosophic, abstract, or genre-specific (Claude Chabrol), Truffaut's films have an unadorned, informal quality that is disarming, in that his films are not any the less well conceived, constructed, or shot. The New Wave washed ashore in this country toward the end of the sixties, contributing to the development of a number of directors, including Peter Bogdanovitch, Martin Scorsese, George Lucas, Mike Nichols, Brian De Palma, and others. It's sad to say that, unlike Parker and the other Be Bopers, the evidence of the New Wave's influence on movies has almost completely vanished, the conventions reasserting themselves, even with the directors who were spawned by it.

 

We've already seen a lot of his work, including Jules and Jim, and The 400 Blows. With regard to the latter, we will get to see the entire Antoine Doinel saga, including also Antoine et Colette, Stolen Kisses, Bed and Board, and Love on the Run.

 

Two I'm particularly looking forward to are Day For Night, his love letter to filmmaking, and The Bride Wore Black. The last is a--well I won't say what it's about, except that you'll have to suspend your disbelief to a considerable extent with this one, but you'll want to, it's such a delicious tale of implacable revenge.

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Slayton, very interesting post. I love Truffaut's work and am glad that *The Story of Adele H* will be shown as part of the tribute. I think it's one of his best films. Though I think my favorite New Wave filmmaker is Eric Rohmer.

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I think my favorite Rohmer film is A Tale of Summer," part of the Four Seasons trilogy. As a jolly and realistic a film as I've ever seen. (Not to be confused with his film Le Rayon Vert, which is sometimes translated as Summer).

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slayton, great original post about the deservedly respected Francois Truffaut. I am very much looking forward to Friday nights again in July. It looks like TCM has a pretty comprehensive line-up of Truffaut's work.

I highly recommend this director, especially for anyone not all that familiar with foreign films.As slayton has pointed out, Truffaut's movies tend to be more accessible than many "New Wave" and foreign filmmakers.

The Antoine Doinel film cycle ( I believe it's four movies altogether) kicks off the Truffaut-fest tomorrow night.

All you film noir fans who made a point of tuning into TCM on Friday nights last month, I suggest you do the same for July.

No, Truffaut didn't really make a lot of noirs (except maybe *Shoot the Piano Player* ) but if you appreciate good filmmaking, memorable characters, wry comedy, and maybe a little food for thought to consume along with your popcorn, Francois Truffaut's work is well worth discovering.

 

Also: His films are hard to find. Take advantage of their availability on TCM this month.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}So, nobody excited about Truffaut Friday nights?

Are you kidding?? IMO it's easily the highlight of the year to date. I'm especially looking forward to my favorite, Mississippi Mermaid, a terrific Belmondo / Deneuve thriller with a million plot twists.

 

OTOH I do wish that TCM would also consider a similar tribute to Eric Rohmer, maybe a SUTS day centered on his "Comedies & Proverbs" and "4 Seasons" series. Rohmer's completely unlike any other director I've ever seen, but the more I get into his films, especially those from the 80's and 90's, the more I've become addicted both to his style and to the recognizable character types he presents. He and Truffaut are both considered "New Wave", but there's not much that Truffaut's most well known movies have in common with Rohmer's. They're both great directors but in different ways.

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Thanks, MissW for your post. I was looking for more comments, but perhaps after some of his films are shown tomorrow people will have more to say. I'm interested in hearing what their impressions are.

 

I'm definitely keeping my DVD recorder warmed up.

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Can't hardly wait for *The 400 Blows* and the rest of Antoine Doinel's adventures tonight on TCM !

 

Those who shy away from foreign films because of having to read the sub-titles: try to overcome that aversion. You soon get used to it. And it is so worth it, there are so many fantastic movies made in languages other than English.

 

I'm also looking forward to all the other Francois Truffaut offerings this month, especially *The Bride Wore Black* and *MIssissippi Mermaid*, both of which I've never seen but always wanted to.

 

 

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Much as I still loved The 400 Blows the third time around, I have to say that my first exposure to Antoine and Colette was about as depressing a movie experience as I've had in a very, very long time. Unrequited young love is never easy to watch, but it's never been quite so achingly depicted as it was in this brief 31 minute sequel to the first movie. Did anyone else have this same reaction?

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Well, after all my urging everyone to watch the first of the Truffaut film series last night, after my shamelessly bumping the thread etc, I am sorry to confess that I myself did not watch them. I had what you could call a "family situation" - nothing serious, just something that prevented me from watching TCM last night.

 

I am very disappointed about this, because gawd knows when they'll be screening them again, if ever. And it would have been such a treat to view all the Antoine Doinel films in a row.

 

Andy, the "31 minute sequel" you speak of sounds interesting.I don't believe I've ever seen that one.

 

 

mbfan, I'm so glad you liked these films. Hope you stick around and comment on next Friday's offerings.

Well, it's the weekend following July 4th, and I imagine lots of people have gone on holidays or otherwise are not spending as much time here. It's not just this thread that's gotten little action, so I won't rant about "why won't people watch foreign films" blahblah. Most likely it's the time of year that explains the lack of response on this and for that matter, other threads.

But stay tuned for next Friday night..they've got *The Bride Wore Black* lined up.

 

 

I'll have to make sure I don't have any family situation, or any other kind of "situation", that night.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jul 6, 2013 10:30 AM

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I must admit to being prosaic and preferring *Shoot the Piano Player* and *Day for Night* .

 

Truffaut is the reason I enjoy Close Encounters so much. Just the suggestion at the time that there were scientists exploring concepts so left field as to suggest music (by yet another European!) and not so American-centric was a fascinating concept. And that whole French/Spanish/cartographer translation game going on in the beginning is a perfect setup to the open-mindedness of the team later. Anyway, a heroic character as a slim, nerdy music/science type was a perfect role for him.

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I dvr'd all the films for future viewing. I watched most of 400 Blows last night but have seen it before, however, I don't think I've ever seen any of the other films. So am excited to watch at least two tonight (the short film and the next full feature). Going to enjoy, as after July 4th and before, if I don't sit in another backyard BBQ with heat and bugs for the rest of the summer, I'll be a happy camper.

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I greatly enjoyed the Antoine Doniel films shown tonight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have a question about the flashback shown in the final film LOVE ON THE RUN where Antoine sees Colotte with her baby and her husband Albert. In this black-and-while flashback, Jean-Pierre Leaud and Marie-France Pisler look to be the ages they were in "Antoine and Colette," but this scene was not in "Antoine and Colette" that was shown on TCM. The segment ends with Antoine watching TV with Colette's parents after she leaves for her date with Albert, followed by the montage of stills as the song "Love at Twenty" is sung. There was no scene with Antoine later seeing married Colette with her baby. Does anyone know if perhaps this scene appeared later in the full film LOVE AT TWENTY from which "Antoine and Colette" came?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also, has anyone ever seen LOVE AT TWENTY in its entirety? I currently see no comments for the film on its TCM entry, which makes makes me think it has never been shown on TCM. After seeing the "Antoine and Colette" segment, I am intrigued to see the four other tales of young love in LOVE AT TWENTY from the other international directors.

 

 

 

Edited by: HoldenIsHere on Jul 6, 2013 3:26 PM

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I've seen The 400 Blows and Stolen Kisses before, but I did catch

Bed and Board. I have to admit that despite the overall charm and

humor of the movie, Doinel is a bit of a bore. A little of him goes a

long way for me. Aside from that, it's basically a hubby gonna go

out and cheat flick with some French atmosphere that makes it

a little more interesting than average. It's a good film, but no master-

piece.

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I just finished watching Antoine & Colette. It is a great short, especially considering what happened before to this character. I would never describe it as "depressing". It's bittersweet alright, brought back so many memories of youth. But a beautiful reminisce of those early days of young love, even if I cringed a bit about my own experiences. Lovely. I look forward to the next one.

 

Edited by: StBartsActor on Jul 6, 2013 6:35 PM

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I watched 400 Blows in its entirety tonight. I thought I had seen it before, but as I watched the beginning, I realized I had only seen parts of it. I was blown away, mostly from the humanity of the story of this young child. It is an incredible film. That last scene runs for over 3 minutes, I think, of Antoine running and then that freeze! I loved that the short film following reintroduced his young friend from 400 and (spoiler) he is now a sucessful stock broker (a hoot). Everyone should have a friend like that. I can't wait to see the rest of the films.

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I've just watched Stolen Kisses and did enjoy it overall, but after 400 Blows (which has to be the peak of the Antoine films) plus the short, Antoine & Colette, I came away from Stolen Kisses feeling it was funny and very well written, it also lacked the emotional impact of the earlier two. And I guess that is OK and intended, since Truffaut/Antoine are not in the same place all these years later.

 

 

 

I cannot answer your question yet, as I have not seen Love On The Run yet, and still have Bed And Board to go before that, but it strikes me that Stolen Kisses has a scene in which you describe with Antoine running into Collette and her husband and baby on the street as he was "sleuthing". But this scene is in color, so I'll watch out for it when I get to Love On The Run.

 

 

 

I am sure Antoine may become a bore at some point as Holden points out, but I find it interesting to think Antoine is Truffaut's alter ego and where Antoine goes, so does Truffaut go.

 

 

 

The best line in Stolen Kisses is the difference between what a gentleman says to a naked lady and what a tactful person says. Totally classic.

 

Edited by: StBartsActor on Jul 7, 2013 6:07 PM

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The 400 Blows is definitely the best of the five that were shown on Friday, and may be the best Truffaut film, period. But other than that, the best of the rest are coming up in future weeks.

 

In particular, if anyone hasn't seen Mississippi Mermaid or The Bride Wore Black, then this upcoming week you should circle your calendars in red. What makes these two special are the extraordinary performances of Catherine Deneuve and Jeanne Moreau. There are plenty of other great Truffauts, but those are the two that seem to show up here the least.

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Thanks, Andy, I'll look for those, have never seen either one. And I need to correct myself, it was John who said Antoine was kind of getting to him and after this marathon, I'm feelig the same way about Antoine. One more to go, will try and do tomorrow. SInce they were intended to be viewed several years apart, maybe that's how they need to be seen, but I thought it was a great way for the uninitiated to see them like this.

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I watched 400 Blows again, but I'm sorry to say nothing else. I wish I had recorded them for future viewing, but having just freed up some space (by watching a dozen or so movies over the 4th long wknd) I was reluctant to clog up the dvr again.

 

Was Love on the Run the last film to feature Trauffaut's alter ego?

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