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In a way, the Antoine Doinel series is extended by two films by other filmmakers: Godard's MASCULINE FEMININE, which has Jean-Pierre Leaud as a trendy leftist youth (Antoine Doinel discovers Mao!), and Jean Eustache's THE MOTHER AND THE ****, in which Leaud plays a shallow, vapid, narcissistic young man who lives off an older woman and spouts pseudo-intellectual drivel. In other words, Eustache eviscerates Truffaut's notion of Leaud as a charming alter ego and Godard's acceptance of Leaud as a possible leftist hero. Because much of Eustache's film is autobiographical, he is also ruthlessly criticizing himself.

 

 

THE MOTHER AND THE **** would be a great follow-up to the Doinel series. For some reason, it is not available on DVD, even though Cahiers du Cinema once called it the best film of the 70s. Despite that, it's a good film!

 

 

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Thanks, StBartsActor.

 

 

I am going to watch STOLEN KISSES and look for that scene with Antione running into Colette with her husband and baby on the street. I am pretty sure the flashback from LOVE ON THE RUN was in B&W rather than color, but what you describe is what happened in the flashback. In LOVE ON THE RUN, it was Colette who was recalling the meeting on the street.

 

 

And, yes, it was someone other than I who said they found Antione to be a bore in the later films. I found him fascinating in all the movies.

 

 

I just learned that Jean-Pierre Leaud appeared in THE LAST TANGO IN PARIS. I am now intrigued to see that movie. I think he plays the fiance of the girl that Marlon Brando's character has the ongoing affair with.

 

 

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Thanks HoldenIsHere, I still have not watched the last film, maybe tomorrow night. David Edelstein, in his remarks, did say that Love On The Run has a lot of scenes from the previous films. I really did enjoy all the films and appreciated TCM showing an evening of Truffaut like that. I realized you were not the person who called Antoine a "bore" after I posted, and think I may have corrected later on, but after watching so many films back to back and after the great impact 400 Blows had on me, I was a bit ready to give Antoine up for awhile. I couldn't garner a lot of sympathy for his character in the last film I saw, even knowing his abused, tortured childhood. Maybe Truffaut just felt he was laying himself out there, not looking for sympathy. Dunno. I wondered why I never got into the French Wave of films and realized I was just graduating grammar school in 1959 when 400 Blows opened and 6 years later, when the next, full Antoine film came out, I had already received my subway token from Uncle Sam and didn't have a lot of time for French New Wave.

 

Edited by: StBartsActor on Jul 11, 2013 12:14 AM

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I get the impression from the comments posted that Truffaut's b/w films are generally more powerful and appreicated than his color films. And indeed they do seem to have more liveliness, and energy in thier direction. The later films in the Doinel series do seem to flag, but it's hard to be critical of Truffaut. After all, once you've thrown a brick through the window of convention, you don't have it around to throw any more bricks through. The only thing that remains is to build up your own conventions, and then, when you've finished, throw a brick through them (I can't think of a director who's ever done that, except maybe Nicholas Ray). Love on the Run is the best of them, even if it is made up to a considerable extent of clips from the other movies. It has a substance missing from Stolen Kisses and Bed and Board.

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I did call him a bit of a bore in Bed and Board, but not a total one. He's

still got a little charm. Of course how one reacts to a character in a movie

is rather personal. I believe Leaud had something of a difficult childhood like

Truffaut and maybe that's one reason he cast him in The 400 Blows, he saw

him as somewhat of a kindred spirit. That's still the best one of the group to me.

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I have finally watched all the Antoine films with Love On The Run. It totally "grabbed" me in ways that 400 Blows and Collette did. The use of the flashbacks does not diminish this film in any way but gives a more complete picture of who Antoine has become and explains some of his past actions. Truffaut almost spells it out for us as to what Antoine was going through in the earlier films. As much as I enjoyed Jean-Pierre in all these films, this is the one where I felt his acting truly stood out (as an adult). This is a gem and totally took me by surprise. I was definitely moved by the scenes of Antoine's maturing and the fate of some characters with the cards they were dealt.. Very sad.... yes, this is a brillaint one.

 

 

I'm looking forward to seeing more Truffaut. I have only seen Day For Night, so I have a lot of catching up to do.

 

 

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Hi everyone. I had a great time rewatching every one of Truffaut's movies and writing intros and outros. Very challenging to get all my thoughts into a short space of time. For me, the most interesting film of the second Friday is Mississippi Mermaid, one of Truffaut's biggest flops. I know why audiences rejected it, since it starts out as a superb crime picture and then segues into pure weird obsessive Truffaut romanticism. The rhythms change in a way I'm sure made some people angry. Truffaut loved genres movies but in his best films he followed his passions and disfigured (in a good, personal way) the structure. The last film I introduce, Such a Gorgeous Kid Like Me, is very hard to see (no Region 1 DVDs) and worth a look. Truffaut made it after the formal, anguished Two English Girls as a way of getting his Nouvelle Vague mojo back, and it has its pleasures.

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Glad to see that for one of the first times in my life, my taste agrees with a big time movie critic. I'm *really* looking forward to seeing Mississippi Mermaid again, as along with The 400 Blows it's my favorite of all the Truffauts. I didn't mind the ending at all, since the entire plot was so entertainingly farfetched to begin with that a little strangeness at the end didn't seem all that out of line with the rest of the movie. Obviously just one person's opinion.

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Yes, I did finally see the scene (in color) in STOLEN KISSES where Antoine runs into Colette on the street.

 

 

I wonder why Truffaut decided to have the flashback of this meeting appear in black-and-white in LOVE ON THE RUN? There were other flashbacks from STOLEN KISSES and they were in color.

 

 

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Dunno, especially as you correctly say, the flashbacks are all the way they were originally shown except that one. For me, I'd just say it was Trauffaut's preference, but some might say, it may have been the way he remembered her (not in blazing color, but b/w since it was such a painful period), but then, who knows?

 

 

One thing I meant to tell you is that you were interested in watching more Jean-Pierre. There's more coming up this month on TCM. I don't think he is in any tonight, but there are a few "gems" tonight that others have been talking about and my DVR is set. But Jean-Pierre will be in more Trauffaut films later on this month.

 

 

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Looks like Truffaut Noir tonight. One has already been shown, and that recently, Shoot the Piano Player. It's the best of the bunch, in spite of the unfairness of the ending. I don't mind unhappy endings, but this one seems wrong to me, as well as the way Truffaut deals with it, or fails to. The other movies are almost as good, or more enjoyable to watch. My favorite of them is The Bride Wore Black. As I said, it requires a considerable amount of suspension of disbelief, as much as a bungee jumper over the Grand Canyon would need, but it's such an engaging story, you're willing to work as hard as Truffaut does.

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The violence in THE BRIDE WORE BLACK is not very visceral. Suspense isn't Truffaut's strong suit. The film plays out more as a series of vignettes into various aspects of French society. More for Jeanne Moreau fans than for Hitchcock fans.

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I saw The Bride Wore Black a few years back and found it pretty

entertaining, though it is a little far-fetched, but so are a lot of good

movies. There are a few shots where Jeanne Moreau does indeed

look like Bette Davis. I think I saw Mississippi Mermaid many years

ago, but I'm not quite sure. I may be in for one of those 'Oh yeah, I've

seen this one' moments. I have an old VHS tape of Two English Girls

around somewhere, but who knows where.

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Truffaut is my favorite New Wave director, however, with the exception of maybe Day for Night (which I need to re-watch) I don't think he ever made a great, great film. As in "one of the top 10 French films ever" great.

 

I know The 400 Blows and Jules and Jim are considered as such, but they've never been amongst my favorite films of his, and I think both are a little overrated.

 

Instead, it's his lesser known films that I like and his body of work and overall love of cinema which I admire.

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> {quote:title=kingrat wrote:}{quote}The violence in THE BRIDE WORE BLACK is not very visceral. Suspense isn't Truffaut's strong suit. The film plays out more as a series of vignettes into various aspects of French society. More for Jeanne Moreau fans than for Hitchcock fans.

Absolutely, since most french films are an excessively visual and artsy series of often bizarre vignettes. This one I could understand despite the subtitles. Jeanne Moreau was sure hot as the huntress Diana but she herself is cold and morose throughout especially when interviewed by the police and of course like she says, she don't care and nothing matters. I knew beforehand I was gonna regret sitting thru this but Moreau sure was hot as huntress Diana. :P

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The Bride Wore Black - I found it entertaining enough, more so, it clearly is an homage to a great director from another. But even Edelstein says "Truffaut was not happy with it". It's an imperfect film to be sure, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. I'll watch the Mermaid film tomorrow (maybe, but I have it dvr'd). The music score here was wonderful.

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>This one I could understand despite the subtitles.

 

I have trouble watching a film and reading subtitles at the same time.

 

However, Wiki usually has a full synopsis of a film's plot, including the ending of the film. IMDB usually doesn't have that much information.

 

With foreign films, I usually follow along with the Wiki synopsis, but I don't read the ending until the end of the movie. :)

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For me it is the loss of watching the facial expressions while reading the dialogue. It's a problem. Takes me a good 15 or 20 minutes longer to watch a film because I am always going back to watch or listen to something.

 

 

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>StBartsActor:

>For me it is the loss of watching the facial expressions while reading the dialogue

 

That is the major drawback of watching a subtitled film. There are a few things I do that help me follow the film and allow me to watch the actors more. One is, I realized it is not necessary to carefully read all the words in the subtitles. It's surprising to learn how much you can get from glancing at the entire subtitle all at once. Also, for long subtitles, I find looking at the end of the sentence helps a lot in getting the gist of the entire subtitle. And, once I've seen the film and I know what's going to happen, when I watch it on subsequent occasions (for films that are worth it) I pay more attention to the action.

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>JefCostello:

>I don't think he ever made a great, great film. As in "one of the top 10 French films ever" great. I know The 400 Blows and Jules and Jim are considered as such, but they've never been amongst my favorite films of his, and I think both are a little overrated.

 

People have their likes and dislikes. But it is difficult to ignore the influence both those films have had on filmmakers and filmmaking. In fact, it's hard to think of two other films that have had a greater effect. As I said earlier, Truffaut's effect on filmmaking was much like Charley Parker and the other Be Bopper's influence on jazz. He and the other members of the New Wave remade movies, introducing new themes and styles. They came up with a fresh, vigorous, and lively approach to movies, free of the stultifying mannerisms of the mainstream cinema. You can look to Rhomer, or Renoir, or Bresson, or Godard, or Clouzot, but you will not find more influential or more highly regarded work. Nowadays, people who really like a movie will readily call it a 'masterpiece.' These two films are two that deserve the term, and are, indeed, two the the ten best French films. The 400 Blows can also be considered as among the ten best anywhere.

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> {quote:title=FlyBackTransformer wrote:}{quote} Absolutely, since most french films are an excessively visual and artsy series of often bizarre vignettes.

Most French films definitely are not like this. What you're describing is less than 5% of what that country produces (probably less than 1% as most "art" films aren't even anything like that.)

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> {quote:title=slaytonf wrote:}{quote}but you will not find more influential or more highly regarded work.

That's way over the top. Influence is often overstated - there are several high profile examples of descendants of the New Wave but the effect overall is more localized.

 

The most extreme innovations of New Wave filmmakers (Godard's "planned"-style films - Vivre sa Vie, Une Femme Mariee, through La Chinoise and onto his later films of the 80s, 90s, 00s - and some of Rivette's wilder stuff) weren't the ones that were widely adopted. The ones that were (street-level realism) were already apparent in the 1950s (not just Cassavetes but Lionel Rogosin, Morris Engel - an important influence on Truffaut - and other independents.) The renowned stylistic tics pop up often today but mostly in superficial contexts (and then that's sharing space with the well known Fellini and Bergman-isms that are perhaps even more present.)

 

By the early 70s most of that influence had played out and had itself become "stultifying mannerisms of the mainstream cinema." It's not for nothing that people like Fassbinder (who even in the late 60s was already doing a lot more than the Band of Outsiders type of cinema) quickly adopted a very different aesthetic.

 

Truffaut himself would claim Rossellini as much more influential than any of them (as would Godard and Rivette.) He was already doing a good chunk of what they did in the period between 1948 and 1954.

 

 

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