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> {quote:title=JonasEB wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=FlyBackTransformer wrote:}{quote} Absolutely, since most french films are an excessively visual and artsy series of often bizarre vignettes.

> Most French films definitely are not like this. What you're describing is less than 5% of what that country produces (probably less than 1% as most "art" films aren't even anything like that.)

I'm sure you're right. I guess the few foreign films I sat thru have come across to me like that. I mean if someone asked me what my favorite french film is I would say *Papillon*. :P :^0 :^0

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> {quote:title=Hibi wrote:}{quote}I hate The Bride Wore Black, but am looking forward to Mississippi Mermaid, which I've never seen.... Wish Bride were on later.

Hibi, I'm interested - would you mind elaborating on why you hate *The Bride Wore Black* ?

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> {quote:title=FlyBackTransformer wrote:}{quote}Just how visceral is the violence in The Bride Wore Black? Is it worth sitting thru just to see Jeanne Moreau as the huntress Diana? :P

There's hardly any actual violence at all, let alone "visceral" violence. Why do you assume there would be?

This film is an homage to Hitchcock, and other than *Psycho*, he isn't known for excessive violence on screen (and even the violence in *Psycho* is more supplied by our minds than by Hitchcock.)

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> {quote:title=JefCostello wrote:}{quote}

> I've never had trouble watching the screen and reading the subtitles. After you see enough foreign films, you get used to it and it becomes second nature.

>

> Just a matter of experience.

>

>

>

I'm just some stupid Southerner from Alabama, but I don't have any poblem with subtitles. Better that than dubbed. My method is taking a visual snapshot of the subtitle and then watch the action. It's never been difficult for me.

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helenbaby, like you and jeff, I never have a problem with subtitles. I think the more you watch foreign films, the more accustomed you get to the subtitles until you get to the point where you hardly notice them. And as you say, better subtitles than dubbing !

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Thanks Slaytonf, appreciate your comments. Sad to say, but on threads like these, people are only going to read the last thing they read. I hope they go back to what I originally said, referring to facial expressions and reading. This Thread is not a discussion of subtitles.

 

 

 

 

 

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You're right, St.Barts, it is NOT a thread about subtitles - or more accurately, foreign films in general (since the question of subtitles would never come up if we were talking about English language films.)

It is a thread about the movies of Francois Truffaut.

I did think about that when I wrote my comment about subtitles, but since quite a few others -including yourself and slayton - addressed this matter on this thread, I don't see what's wrong with my expressing my opinion about them too.

 

I have read every post on this thread, and almost always do read the entire thread before posting myself.

 

I'm not sure why it's ok for you and slayton to write a post on dealing with subtitles in a foreign language film, but not me or others.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jul 13, 2013 10:24 PM

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I've never watched any of these movies the way they were intended to be watched.

 

They were NOT released in France in the English language with French subtitles.

 

ALL of these films should be dubbed in English, by good actors with French accents, so we can WATCH the films and LISTEN TO the sound tracks.

 

Autant en emporte le vent

 

Lo que el viento se llev?

 

Casablanca in German:

 

High Noon in German:

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I totally enjoyed Mississippi Mermaid. Caught up with it last night. What a good film. Yes, I really like Deneuve but I loved Jean Paul Belmondo in this. So cool. David E. also talked about the ending and how the public was upset with it. I had no issue either, but it makes you think about how many films, since this film, have ended with very ambiguous endings where the director is asking the audience to make up its own mind. For me, before it became very obvious this was the end, I was formulating, in my own mind, the fate of the characters.

 

 

Miss W. - again, you are absolutely correct. I answered a Post and ultimately things started to unravel. I have added this to my never ending list of Thou Shalt Not's.

 

 

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I just realized Mississippi Mermaid was made in 1969! I actually thought it was made much earlier. In my head, I was thinking the The Graduate ending, but of course, that was before this film. Anyway, another thought occurred, that there is a definite Hitch feel to this one as well.

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Sorry, for the delay, I'd have to watch Bride Wore Black again to give a full answer and that I do not want to do! I just thought it was a bad Hitchcock homage, but after seeing Mississippi Mermaid this past wknd, Bride doesnt seem so bad. I cant think of another director whose films (for me) tip the scales at both ends. Some of his films I really love. others I just think are awful............

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Funny, cause the middle of Mermaid didn't both me (and David E. warned that it may as well). Also, I kind of feel the reverse, I liked Mermaid more that Bride. Also, saw Shoot The Piano Player this weekend, which I really enjoyed. The ending at the farm didn't work too well for me, but I thought what lead up to that point was brilliant.

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Despite frequent TCM showings, I've yet to view Shoot the Piano Player. I guess because it's never in primetime and I dont want to clog up the DVR until I have time to watch it (which isnt this season)......

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I hear ya..... I clogged up my DVR but I've had the luxury of two weekends back to back where I made plenty of time for myself, so I knew I was going to be able to do a lot of dvr, watch and erase. What is surprising to me is that I've not seen any of Trufffaut, other than Day For Night. Try Shoot The Piano Player when it is on again, I think you will like it.

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Hopefully it'll pop up again before the year is out. I had a TCM marathon a few wknds ago and must've watched a dozen films. So I'm trying to be careful to not fill it up too soon (LOL) Just too busy this time of year......

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Hibi, I am sure you know this, but I never DVR these old films on the HD station. I go to the non HD station and it does not take up as much room in the dvr. With Truffaut going up again Friday, now I want to see some of these Bryan Forbes films this week. Seance is hardly ever on (I don't think) and L Shaped Room with Leslie Caron (who I would watch reading a telephone book).

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I dont get the HD station but I'm still around 80% (LOL) I wish they were showing Long Ago, Tomorrow. I've never seen that one (Forbes) I dont think TCM has ever showed it. (probably not on DVD)......I dont think they did a tribute when Forbes died, did they? Maybe this is it........

 

 

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Here is a brand new *verb* for the TCM dictionary: to Dobb

 

meaning to dub a Foreign film in English, thus gutting its impact, which cannot be retained when the original language has been replaced. While one listen to the "Dobbing" in English, it will not be possible to feel any emotion without hearing the language in which the film was created.

 

 

musikone

 

 

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If people aren't Truffauted-out yet, we have coming up tonight a mix of movies. One true masterpiece (Jules and Jim), a good one that I remember dimly (The Man Who Loved Women), one I started to watch, but lost interest (The Woman Next Door), and two I look forward to seeing for the first time (well, you know what they are).

 

People should be well-familiar with Jules and Jim, as it's one of the most famous movies, and been shown on TCM a number of times. The Man Who Loved Women reminds me a lot of Love on the Run, in that it is an over-view of a man's relations with women. As for The Woman Next Door, although I force myself to watch whatever I can of the work of a director I admire, I'm not always successful. I'll try again tonight.

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