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Masculine Role Models for Young Women


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LOL

 

Yep, that was pretty funny, Char!

 

(...however, you DO realize that there is still a sizable number of, let us say "Traditionalists" in this country who would probably view this as a "REAL Documentary", don't ya?!) ;)

 

LOL

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THIS JUST IN....

 

*?Oz the Great and Powerful? Rekindles the Notion That Women Are Wicked*

 

by Natalie Wilson

 

The new Oz film does not include the brave and self-reliant Dorothy, nor any other character that I would identify as having my grandmother?s feminist spirit. The film speaks neither to the many strong female characters that populated L. Frank Baum?s books nor to the feminist, progressive leanings of its author. Instead, it trades in the notion that women are indeed wicked?especially those women not ?tamed? by a male love interest or father figure, as well as (horror of horrors!) those women who lack nurturing, motherly characteristics.

 

In the film, Oscar Diggs is the one who journeys to Oz, not Dorothy, and this provides the basis for a much more traditional, or should I say regressive, story.

 

http://msmagazine.com/blog/2013/03/14/oz-the-great-and-powerful-rekindles-the-notion-that-women-are-wicked/

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Remember a time when naysayers to the '60's "counter culture" were finding referrences to drugs in the music that surprised even those songs composers?

 

 

This clip reminded me of that.

 

 

Probably none of that crap was on anyone's mind when they made that movie. But if you dig deep enough, and look hard enough, you'll see anything you want. Like Jon Stewart's "gay referrences in westerns" parody the year he hosted the Oscars.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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What I find so very wonderful in that video is how it is so perfect a representation of how people with a serious but seriously misguided agenda project their prejudices onto movies or other media and they are able to "find" things which do not exist.

 

A researcher has recently found that the Teletubbies are representations of the characters in Samuel Beckett's Quad and Quad II

 

I am reminded of the feminist argument that male domination in all aspects of science is exemplified by the fact that if women had been in charge of the design aspects then rockets would not be shaped that way.

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>I am reminded of the feminist argument that male domination in all aspects of science is exemplified by the fact that if women had been in charge of the design aspects then rockets would not be shaped that way.

 

Hmm, a woman must have designed this Mars Lander:

 

http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2012/08/02/mars_lander_05-30157761ec06c5c401a602a2ea6d13c576648b92.jpg

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>I am reminded of the feminist argument that male domination in all aspects of science is exemplified by the fact that if women had been in charge of the design aspects then rockets would not be shaped that way.

 

Well, I suppose once it would escape Earth's atmosphere, a donut-shaped rocket WOULD BE as good as any other, RIGHT?!

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}THIS JUST IN....

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> *“Oz the Great and Powerful” Rekindles the Notion That Women Are Wicked*

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> by Natalie Wilson

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> The new Oz film does not include the brave and self-reliant Dorothy, nor any other character that I would identify as having my grandmother’s feminist spirit. The film speaks neither to the many strong female characters that populated L. Frank Baum’s books nor to the feminist, progressive leanings of its author. Instead, it trades in the notion that women are indeed wicked—especially those women not “tamed” by a male love interest or father figure, as well as (horror of horrors!) those women who lack nurturing, motherly characteristics.

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> In the film, Oscar Diggs is the one who journeys to Oz, not Dorothy, and this provides the basis for a much more traditional, or should I say regressive, story.

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Edited by: traceyk65 on Jul 1, 2013 7:49 PM ARGH. WHY DOES MY POST KEEP GETTING SWALLOWED BY THE QUOTE???

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OK, What I was trying to say was that I think that author of the quote below may have missed the plot of the movie. It was meant to be a prequel to the traditional Oz movie, not a replacement. It tells the story of how the Wizard got to Oz and how the Wicked Witch of the West became wicked.

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>OK, What I was trying to say was that I think that author of the quote below may have missed the plot of the movie.

 

Are you talking to me? :)

 

This is a sequel, since it was made 73 years later. It was also made as a modern computer-animation film with lots of special effects in it, just like other movies with the same kind of special effects.

 

They even made one about Zorro as a super-hero, and now they have The Lone Ranger and Tonto as super-heros, rather than normal human beings.

 

If kids today like this kind of stuff, that's ok with me. But I will never see it.

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*This is a sequel, since it was made 73 years later. It was also made as a modern computer-animation film with lots of special effects in it, just like other movies with the same kind of special effects.*

 

Fred, this movie may have followed TWOO by being made 73 years later, but it is NOT a sequel. It is a prequel, because the events take place well before Dorothy's arrival in Oz. It describes how the "Wizard" arrived in Oz and became "The Wizard" of Oz. I don't know if it is based on one of Baum's books, but it captures quite well some of the magic we've come to associate with the 1939 film.

 

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No Fred, sorry it wasn't very clear! :)

I was actually talking about the person who wrote the article you quoted. It seemed like she had this point to make about anti-feminism and was disregarding the plot of the movie to make it (if she even saw the movie at all).

If she really wanted to go on about anti-feminist themes, she should have gone after the Wicked Witch of the West, whose transformation seemed to have been fueled by a jealous rage over the Wizard. When she was in love, she was all pretty and sweet; when she was a woman scorned, she morphed into a green-faced hag...

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> {quote:title=LiamCasey wrote:}{quote}

> Once outside of an atmosphere, a spherical rocket would be the best. Maximizes volume while minimizing surface area. And, yes, I do qualify as a nerd. :)

 

I believe I qualify as a pedantic nerdling! :)

 

I have seen analyses which show that the best form for an interplanetary rocket would be like small beads on a very long string with the string being a rigid beam.

 

It is true that a sphere has the most efficient shape re volume vs. surface area but it also presents a great surface area which is undesirable because of the risk of impacts. It is my understanding that it is a nightmare also when dealing with stresses of acceleration.

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> {quote:title=traceyk65 wrote:}{quote}

> ARGH. WHY DOES MY POST KEEP GETTING SWALLOWED BY THE QUOTE???

 

I believe you need to enter a hard carriage return at the end of the quote before you begin to enter your message. Using only the cursor controls to move to the next line inserts a soft carriage return which the software interprets as being past of the quote.

 

I believe that if you position the cursor at the end of the quote and then press "Enter" then your text will be separate and distinct.

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> {quote:title=SansFin wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=traceyk65 wrote:}{quote}

> > ARGH. WHY DOES MY POST KEEP GETTING SWALLOWED BY THE QUOTE??? I believe you need to enter a hard carriage return at the end of the quote before you begin to enter your message. Using only the cursor controls to move to the next line inserts a soft carriage return which the software interprets as being past of the quote.

> I believe that if you position the cursor at the end of the quote and then press "Enter" then your text will be separate and distinct.

>

OK, I'll try that. Thanks!

 

Edited by: traceyk65 on Jul 1, 2013 8:21 PM Yay! That worked !

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Sorry Sepia ol' buddy, but just last night I dreamed a "prequel" to the dream I had just last WEEK!

 

(...though I doubt The Rules around here would allow me go into THAT much detail about the dream AND its "prequel" I had about Ava Gardner and me, other than to say that she was a little younger in the "prequel", of course)

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So all of those Star War prequels don't exist? Man, I paid money to see something that didn't exist!

 

Sorry, but I disagree with you 100%. It doesn't matter if the story is fantasy or not. A prequel is a follow up production about events that took place BEFORE the 'main' (primary), production.

 

A sequel is a follow up production about events that took place AFTER. It really is that simple.

 

 

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Yeah James, I agree with ya too!

 

BUT, ain't it a shame that all those "prequels" to the initial "Star Wars Trilogy" didn't have the levity, lightheartedness and general "Joie de vivre"(sorry 'bout havin' to resort to the use of French there, dude ;) ) that Lucas put into the first round of 'em???

 

(...yep, sorry George, but while I understood your need to "bring us up to date" about what happened to your characters BEFORE Luke shot that big ol' Death Star outta the sky, I gotta ask WHY you forgot to add a lot of what MADE the originals so entertaining in the FIRST place???)

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