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Masculine Role Models for Young Women


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> {quote:title=traceyk65 wrote:}{quote}

> In the clips it looked like a darker version of Barbarella, except with a male protagonist. Obviously, those clips were misleading!

 

It is likely they were not meant to be misleading. Each person will see different things in it and take away different things. Clips are by their nature out of context and this is a movie which must be taken as a whole.

 

The connection to Wizard of Oz is that one of the elite became a man behind a mask by creating an idol to be worshiped and feared by the masses. There are other subtle parallels in the elites' city being difficult to reach and things which I should not say because they might be thought spoilers.

 

I would not say that it is darker than *Barbarella* (1968). It is more physically and psychologically brutal.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> Well, after SansFin's lofty analysis of *Zardoz*

 

I have read again what I wrote and I see that it does look quite pretentious!

 

I did not mean it to be. I believe the reason is that the movie does not lend itself to being discussed in a conversational way. The movie is complex on many levels and it seems to require specific delineations of its concepts and methodology. Why do I suddenly feel as if I am doing it again? :)

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The Fountainhead

Jake in the Heartland

 

Yeah, and just THINK... "The Onion" didn't even have to alter THIS trailer in order to make this FUNNY!!!

 

I mean, talk about your simplistic ARCHETYPES here, EH?!!!

 

LOL

 

(...btw...I sure hope those words "simplistic" and "archetypes" I just used don't fall under that there "highfalutin ten dollar word" category here, 'cause I MAY NOT be able to ever live that down if they ARE!!!)

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SansFin, you are never pretentious and I'm sorry my comment may have appeared to say otherwise.

 

Au contraire, your posts are either informative or entertaining, and often both.

 

I will venture to say, however, that I thought the film *Zardoz* was pretentious. Or would have been if it hadn't been so (unintentionally) funny.

 

(ps: if anyone's pretentious around here, it's probably me, arbitrarily inserting French phrases into my posts. Quite possibly misspelled, something a pretentious person always has to watch, because if you're going to be pretentious, you'd better get your typing, spelling, and grammar right (not to mention your facts) else you'll be the one thing that's worse than pretentious and that's pretentious and incorrect. :| )

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>because if you're going to be pretentious, you'd better get your typing, spelling, and grammar right (not to mention your facts)

 

Ahem, excuse me here, MissW, BUT the "highfalutin ten dollar word" you're seeking here would be: "punctilious".

 

;)

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> I'm sorry my comment may have appeared to say otherwise.

 

+I+ as in me, myself and I thought my post to be pretentious when I read it with new eyes. :)

 

> I will venture to say, however, that I thought the film *Zardoz* was pretentious. Or would have been if it hadn't been so (unintentionally) funny.

 

I believe it is a specialist movie. One must like surrealism and be conversant with certain science fiction tropes and be in a mood to abandon oneself to the roller coaster of shifting realities. I doubt that any person is on the fence about this movie as it seems to me an either-or situation.

 

It helps greatly also if one has a deep appreciation for seeing Sean Connery in various states of undress. :)

 

> if anyone's pretentious around here, it's probably me, arbitrarily inserting French phrases into my posts.

 

I will remind you that you are addressing your comment to a person who has been cited for the nolens volens insertion of Latin phrases. I believe Latin trumps French in terms of pretentiousness. :)

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Not meaning to sound vicious( or maybe MEANING to), one might jump to the conclusion that many of the houses these board members live in look like the houses on *Hoarders* , seeing as to how it appears some of you are willing to buy ANYTHING!

 

 

It's even got to the point some are trying, intellecually, to dissect the movie *Zardoz* . The only thing that I found impressive in this mess( no...NOT a scantily clad Connery) was the image of the "flying face" at the beginning over the strains of the second movement of Beethoven's Symphony #7. I didn't see this thing until it was on TV, and when I, like Connery, discovered the WIZARD OF OZ connection to the word "Zardoz", I was so disgustedly disssapointed, I threw my coffee cup at the TV screen. Luckily, I missed.

 

 

But now my biggest fear is that too many here will work hard at convincing me that this fiasco actually was some kind of DEEP ALLEGORY. I'll attempt to head it off at the pass by stating that it wasn't as DEEP as it was THICK. (apologies to Dick Van Dyke).

 

 

And STILL no discussion, as I attempted, either seriously or facetiously, about "masculine role models for young women".

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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Now, Sepiatone baby, I think we both know that our friend SansFin has an extremely dry wit, and that half the time she has her tongue planted firmly in her cheek when she says certain things.

(Where did that expression come from, anyway? "tongue in cheek"? )

 

I'd also like to gently remind you that this thread was initiated by casablancalover as a humourous one. If you go back to her original post and watch the "Onion" video, I'm sure you'll remember that this thread was never intended as a serious discussion about "Masculine Role Models for Young Women".

 

 

If you think about it, if it were serious, that very title would be rather offensive. Shirley a more appropriate title, if we were to discuss such a topic in earnest, would be "FEMALE Role Models for Young Women."

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jul 15, 2013 12:19 PM

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Point taken, MissW. But I KNEW Sans was being facetious. Still, my Mom would have slapped her just on principle.

 

 

But originally a joke or not, it IS a topic worthy of discussion. Many people do let what's presented in movies, whether serious or not, to shape their attitudes in life. Movie makers know this, and knew it all along. Just witness, for example, how a sexually active teen-aged girl is regarded in old '50's movies( and into the '60's). Likely all with the intent on swaying the behavioral patterns of the teen girls of the time. Obviously, if our heroine( Gidget, Tammy, etc.) is pure, the girls watching them in the movies will wish to emulate.

 

 

At least, that was the HOPE.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=Dargo2 wrote:}{quote}Now c'mon, dark. I'm sure Sepia meant that metafor...ummm...metophor...ummmm....he really didn't meant it literally.

 

Well, I once followed the advice of Dorothy Parker and did NOT toss a book aside lightly. I threw a copy of Breaking Dawn across the room once. With great force. ;) So maybe it WAS meant literally...

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Hey, everyone throws things once in a while when they're steamed up (perhaps like the coffee Sepia was drinking.)

Once, upon finishing a book I realized I loathed, I threw it across the room.

 

(It was "The Story of O", and I had to read it for some university course. Truely.)

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