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"Ava Gardner: The Secret Conversations"


EugeniaH
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I just saw this commercial on TCM. I wasn't aware of it before (I don't get to watch TCM very often, so I don't know how long the ad's been running), Are there others interested in reading this book? I just put a hold on it in my library (I'm number 31 in line!).

 

I admit to being kind of interested in "tell-all" books, as long as they are decently done by reputable authors. I would put David Niven's books in that category - I enjoyed his anecdotes. How about others? Though I understand the idea that classic movie fans should really focus more on the actor's films, and agree with it, I also like "insights" into what makes a person tick.

 

I know, this is an idea retread, but my main question was about the interest in the new Gardner book. :)

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Thanks for pointing that out, lav! It sounds like she's someone with so many stories to tell, lol. Here's the link to the article in case anyone is interested:

 

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/book-corner/640718/Ava-Gardner-The-Secret-Conversations.html

 

(Yes, I definitely want to get to the Spartacus book, too.)

 

Edited by: EugeniaH on Jul 7, 2013 10:34 AM

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I read Ava Gardner: Love is Nothing over the winter and found her fascinating. She certainly never did anything by halves! This new book sounds a little like I'd Love to Kiss You which was conversations between Whitley Stein and Bette Davis. Boy was that ever frank! If you want another star autobiography that's pretty frank Swanson on Swanson is another good choice.

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*This new book sounds a little like I'd Love to Kiss You which was conversations between Whitley Stein and Bette Davis. Boy was that ever frank!*

 

Oh wow, I hope it is! I own that Davis book and I love it. Even though everyone's opinion is subjective, I would much rather read a bio that is in the star's own words (and as a "conversation" like the Stine book rather than an autobiography, which can also be a little whitewashed.)

 

Thanks for the recommend on the Swanson book, too. :)

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No problem and thanks for the tip on the Ava book--I hadn't seen it. Another star autobio that was surprisingly entertaining was Shirley Temple's Child Star. I'm not sure if I buy all of it (especially the part where she finds out her father isn't exactly an honest man, but maybe she IS that forgiving) but she's very honest about her antics while in high school and so forth.

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Interesting - I normally wouldn't gravitate to a Temple biography, but it sounds like it's worth checking out.

 

With some stars, I wonder if there are any books that finally unearth the "truth" despite the controversy surrounding them, like with Joan Crawford and Marilyn Monroe...

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Yes, I plan to read it (probably wont buy it). I'm sure it will be a guilty pleasure. How true it all is who can say? (guess it depends on how many drinks Ava had at the time). Knowing Ava, it will be a raunchy ride. While checking out Amazon, I noticed Ava's longtime maid/companion wrote a book recently too. I'm thinking of reading that also (once the weather cools off and my gardening chores give me more free time....)

 

Lavender, I just started The Spartacus book and love it!

 

Edited by: Hibi on Jul 8, 2013 12:03 PM

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Ava Gardner in her autobiography: *Ava: My Story (1990)*, relates one very interesting anecdote that stuck in my memory.

 

She liked Spain; so much so that she lived there a while in happy exile when it was ruled by *General Franco*. People there liked her glam factor and she was fawned over by everybody, including Franco.

 

All was going well, until one day deposed Argentinean leader *Juan Perón* (Husband of the famed "Evita") took up residence in exile in the villa adjacent to hers. Perón continued to have aspirations (or delusions) of making a comeback to Argentina and re-installing himself as President. Perón would stand out on his balcony every morning within close earshot to her, and loudly bellow his prepared return/acceptance speech as if to a mass audience in a public square, rehearsing for his big moment which he felt sure was coming some day.

 

He kept this up, every morning for a long time, shouting as loudly as he could, as if to prepare his voice for the strain. Every morning, the same loud bombastic speech! It became a nuisance to her peace and quiet and so she finally complained to the authorities.

 

Ava acknowledges that that was a big mistake and the beginning of her own troubles with the Spanish authorities, mostly over tax issues. The tax authorities started finding all sorts of issues and violations regarding her income and stay in Spain, making it untenable for her to go on living in a country she had come to love.

 

Franco may have liked her, but he must have valued Perón even more! What made these two men such close and kindred spirits is a long and colorful tale, one that would itself be the topic of a film feature. Going into it would invoke a number of volatile subjects outside the scope of this classic film thread; I'll leave it at that!

 

She not only understood "friends in high place", bit it's flip side as well: making enemies in high places!

 

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