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Bogart Vs. Cagney Vs. Robinson


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Well to be honest with ya here Tom, you HAVE to know that BOTH Paul Henreid(AND Glenn Ford for THAT matter) were usally pretty "boring" in almost ANYTHING they were ever in. RIGHT?!

 

(...you know, especially in Paul's case, what with all that "oh so European" subtle little manner and manners of his, RIGHT?!)

 

LOL

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>Dargo, I have far more upper case words in my last post to you than you did in yours, so I win. Canada 1, U.S. 0.

 

LOL

 

Well THAT of course is because YOU have an "unfair advantage" in YOUR favor up there!

 

(...uh huh, 'cause YOU can ALSO uppercase those "superfluous letter 'u's in words LIKE "favor" that WE down here CAN'T!!!)

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Is there no one that will dispute my claim that Victor Lazslo, whether it's the Paul Henreid factor or not, is boring?

 

Admit it, all you Casablanca lovers (and, I will concede that I am one of them), that character is a bore.

 

 

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Well, I'll tell ya what, Tom. I TOO used to somewhat think that about the Lazslo character myself, however I noticed during the last two times I watched this film, I was starting to notice how more, say, colourfully Paul played him. Yep, in fact I now think he might be one of my new favourite characters in this baby!

 

(...btw, you may have noticed I added a few of those "superfluous letter 'u's" in my above response in hopes you might be better able to comprehend what I was attempting to say here!) ;)

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Don't type like that, twinkee.

 

Those extras U's are in some of my favoUrite words north of the 49th, and pUts the lie to those rUmoUrs that Canadians aren't coloUrful.

 

In fact we've even been known to add the occasional U to a word. So, where was I? Oh, yes, Victor Lazslo is boUring!

 

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Dargo, I would suggest that possibly you found Lazslo more coloUrful on your last two viewings of the film because you were enjoying the contents of an alcoholic beverage at the time. The right amount of booze will do that to you.

 

I once watched a Three Stooges short after consuming eight beers and started slurring about the sophistication of their humoUr.

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HEY now, Tom! I've never said you Canucks were "boring", either because of your inability to totally cut your apron-strings from those folks over there on that little island situated off the coast of Europe or NOT!!!

 

Nope, ALL I said earlier was that YOU guys IN GENERAL haven't been able to perfect being big loud-mouths like some of us good ol' AMERICANS can be...THAT'S all!

 

So PLEASE don't place any more words(containing that needless letter 'u' or NOT) into MY(big loud) mouth here! OKAY, dude?! ;)

 

LOL

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>Dargo, I would suggest that possibly you found Lazslo more coloUrful on your last two viewings of the film because you were enjoying the contents of an alcoholic beverage at the time. The right amount of booze will do that to you. I once watched a Three Stooges short after consuming eight beers and started slurring about the sophistication of their humoUr.

 

Hmmmm...ya know Tom, I MIGHT have to concede this point to ya.

 

Uh huh, come to think of it, I just MIGHT have imbibed more than just my usual two fingers of that golden elixir((Balvenie 12 y/o Single Malt to be exact) which coincidentally comes from the northern part of that "little island situated off the coast of Europe" that I mentioned earlier here and while yet again enjoying the exploits of Rick and Ilsa...and of course Victor...and of course Frenchy...and of course that Nazi jerk Strasser.

 

(...and so, yeah, maybe you're right here.......maybe) ;)

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>Just to push the Canadian content while we're on a roll with it: didn't Edward G. have some kind of connection to Canada? I can't remember what. Maybe not.

 

Yeah MissW. If memory serves, I BELIEVE for a short while during the '46 season, Eddie played shortstop for the Montreal Royals along side Jackie Robinson(no relation, of course) at second base, and JUST before Branch Rickey would use Robinson(Jackie, NOT Eddie once again) to break Baseball's Colo(u)r Line.

 

(...Eddie couldn't hit the curveball ya see, and thus the reason for his very short career on the baseball diamond...OH, and btw, it was Hank Greenberg who broke the Anti-Semitic Line in Baseball, 'cause he COULD hit the curveball, just in case you might be wonderin' about that too)

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Wow! My eyes hurt from catching up on all the postings here. About Casblanca, I agree with Helenbaby but I will add a little more. Even though I think Bogart is a good actor, I don't like him as a romantic lead. He don't fit the part, and he doesn't do it for me. Next, I like more action in my movies along with the romance. I'll tell you what, I only saw the movie in it's entirety once. I should really try and view it again. Sometimes certain movies after viewing them again you change your mind. MissW, I understand how you feel and no harm in asking for someone to explain. As long as we discuss things in respectful manner. I don't like when people are very insulting. You asked nicely and I admire you for that. So whenever I get to see Casablanca again, I will get back to you again. Thanks.

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I think you confused To Have and Have Not with Casablanca. The guy Frenchy is the owner of the bar in THAHN. He is called Frenchy in that movie. Bogie makes fun at him at the end of the movie when he tries to kiss him on both cheeks (something my wife makes me do!).

 

The same actor, Marcel Dalio, plays the guy operating the roulette wheel in Casablanca, but I don't think he is called Frenchy in Casablanca.

 

 

 

 

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Hmmmm...now why am I thinkin' that somewhere along the line Rick, or somebody at least, calls Capt Renault "Frenchy"???

 

And...

 

>Bogie makes fun at him at the end of the movie when he tries to kiss him on both cheeks (something my wife makes me do!).

 

Yeah, that whole "double kiss" thing IS still "de rigueur" over there all over Europe, alright...and to this day is definitely a "fur-end" concept to us Yanks, huh!

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THE ONE TIME THEY WORKED TOGETHER

 

Okay, you wish that it was a stronger film but Smart Money, released in 1931, has the distinction of being the one time that Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney shared the screen together. Fresh off his stardom with Little Caesar, Robinson is the undoubted star of the film as a "lucky barber" with a knack for gambling and a weakness for blondes.

 

Cagney, who was also filming Public Enemy while this film was in progress, had his own stardom just around the corner. While you wish the film had given Cagney more screen time, he still manages to make a solid impression. However, it's Eddie G.'s film all the way.

 

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(...yep, as I've stated MANY times around here, the old "Stone Face" Raft could NOT act worth a damn...as ANYONE not taken with his "tough guy" act, his sharp angled facial features and his ability to dance the "Bolero" HAS to recognize UNLESS they're BLIND!!!!)

 

 

... and yet I love watching him and listening to him. Ask me why and I can't tell you. I just do. Another one of those instinctive likes. Love watching him dance, too. There you go. Differences of opinion are what make horse races. That reminds me ... I've got to get out to the track soon ...

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You're right, Dothery, you're right. Raft couldn't act. EGR was ugly as homemade sin, and Paul Henreid was as exciting as cold soup. And yet you are allowed to love them. That's your prerogative in classically classic movies.

 

Cagney and Bogey and William and the Powells and Grant burned up the screen. And there are those of us who love them to pieces.

 

Them's the facts.

 

Guess TomJH missed my post right before his. La di da.

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I agree, Dothery.

 

I enjoy watching Raft on screen, too.

 

Yes, he was a wooden actor and you're hard pressed to find the same kind of impressive film titles on his resume that distinguished the careers of Bogie and Cagney and Robinson.

 

Still, the most dapper of all Warners tough guys, Raft had an undeniable presence on screen, I feel. He was convincing as a tough guy because, as we all know, that was a reflection of his background. His real life street background was something with which James Cagney could identify. Perhaps that it part of the reason why Cagney had nothing but good things to say about Raft in his autobiography.

 

Raft appeared in a lot of programmers, as we know. Even in these often minor film affairs Raft still captures my attention. While as an actor he clearly lacked the dynamics of a Cagney or Robinson, he was, on the occasion, cast in a good film and it paid off dividends. Look at him as Bogie's truck driver brother in They Drive By Night, conceivably the highlight of his Warners career.

 

Or, at the end of his career, Raft is wonderful as Spats Columbo in Billy Wilder's Some Like It Hot. Who can anyone forget Raft's cold blooded efficiency in that St. Valentine Day's Massacre recreation in the film, the rival gangsters lined up against the wall, his own boys with their tommy guns pointed at them, Raft's back turned to them all with his final statement "Goodbye, Charley," to one of those rivals as his men then splatter them with gunfire.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTv7wH7W77Ps4x9aJeL8jv

 

By the way, Dothery, did you see that posting earlier in this thread dealing with the real life animosity between Raft and Edward G. Robinson and the fight that broke out between them on the set of a film they made together? It also touches on Raft's appearance in the Wilder film. If you missed it, it shouldn't be that hard for you to hunt the posting down since there is a large photo of Robinson and Raft about to go at it with one another.

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JAMES CAGNEY AND THE AFI

 

On March 31, 1974, thirteen years after his retirement, James Cagney was the second film artist (and first actor) to be honoured by the American Film Institute "for his lifetime contribution to enriching American culture through motion pictures."

 

With Frank Sinatra acting as the evening's host, the event was judged an overwhelming success. But the highlight of the evening, everyone agrees, was when Cagney got up on the podium to speak. With the applauding audience of celebrities and friends eating out of his hand, Jimmy was in great form that night, with the agility of his sharp mind and quick wit very much in evidence.

 

Not only did he give a brief imitation of himself saying "Mmmm, you dirty rat," but he also did a (very bad) Cary Grant spin on "Judy, Judy, Judy." And one of the great moments of his address is when Cagney described the shoulder hitching tough guy he watched with fascination as a kid on New York City streets, a bit that he would later utilize in the movies when he played Rocky Sullivan.

 

When Cagney addressed that gala assembly before him, he spoke with directness, humour and humility. But, as always, Jimmy told the truth.

 

Here's a TubeTube link to Jimmy Cagney's nine minute address that 1974 evening. To all Cagney fans, I think seeing the old master once again at this shining moment for him is a must:

 

 

 

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