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Archive of unaired interviews with the biggest names in classic movies


OrcoDev
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Hi there classic movie fans. I thought you would take an interest in listening to never before aired interviews with some of your favorite actors/filmmakers. I've provided a link for all of you to take a listen (to make things easier to find scroll down to the playlist section), and if you're curious about the background on this feel free to keep on reading.

 

*Link for the conversations:* http://www.youtube.com/orcodevelopment

 

 

Since the early 1980's my father taught an educational program to foreign-born students about American film, politics, and the military. But rather than lecture out of a textbook, he felt students would be more enthused if the class spoke to actual people involved in what they were studying. The program was inspired through the friendship of my dad and the late film director Frank Capra. It was through Capra that my dad got to know and recorded interviews with people like Jimmy Stewart, Billy Wilder, Claudette Colbert, Gregory Peck, Kim Hunter, Henry Hathaway, and many more.

 

 

If you guys are interested, I'll keep you updated with the clips that I'm uploading. If you have any questions, feel free to ask here, send me an email, or private message me. I'll try to get back to you as soon as I'm able. If you'd like to know more details about my dad's program and who he's spoken with, click here:

 

 

*Link to my dad's program* http://www.orcodevelopment.org

 

 

And just for kicks, here's a picture of my dad with the late Mr. Capra. Thanks and I hope you enjoy our archive.

 

 

4a87a3_c6657657b81ea3eed5d684ed936c9172.

 

Edited by: OrcoDev on Jul 10, 2013 6:41 PM

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OrcoDev, thanks very much for providing a YouTube link to your father's interviews. I've only superfically surveyed the site but I see that there are interviews with many other figures outside show business, as well.

 

I clicked on the interview with Robert Mitchum about the making of Night of the Hunter. How I wish it could have been more than only five-six minutes long, but it was great to hear the actor's reminiscences, done within days of co-star Lillian Gish's death. He had great memories of what was obviously a happy shoot for everyone involved, calling Charles Laughton "a perfect director" and also saying that it was Laughton, uncredited, who re-wrote the screenplay after receiving a mountain of papers, so to speak, of a script from James Agee.

 

Mitchum said he found his role easy to play because he had met characters like Harry Powell in his travels (yikes!). The actor also claimed to not know that Night of the Hunter didn't do well at the box office, after your father mentioned that fact, as well as the fact that, in typical shrug of the shoulder Mitchum fashion, he never read the film's reviews.

 

Your Dad (I'm assuming he was the interviewer) helped to propell the interview with Mitchum along by his clear knowledge of the people. Mitchum was a bright guy but maybe not the easiest subject to interview, depending upon his mood. He probably respected the fact that this interviewer knew his material well in advance and it made Mitch a little more effusive than he might be on other occasions.

 

If the other interviews are as interesting as this one, this is one great, HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT website that is providing an invaluable service. There are few stars of the Hollywood Golden Era still with us, and it's wonderful that your father, in working with Frank Capra, got the interviews that he did, while those stars were still there to be got.

 

In Canada, at a channel called TVOntario, a movie buff extraordinaire called Elwy Yost (who left us a couple of years ago) travelled to Hollywood frequently for years and had hundreds of recordings of interviews made, some with the likes of a Greer Garson or Henry Fonda or Bob Hope, among so many others, documenting their reminiscences about the Hollywood years, much as did your Dad.

 

Thanks once again for providing that link, OrcoDev. I will definitely be returning to that YouTube site.

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Hey TomJH, thank you so much for the kind words and insightful review of the Mitchum interview. My dad was flattered by your praise of him and the archive. I hope as you discover more interviews you'll find them just as engaging.

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Orco, I'm so glad you bumped this back to Page 1 of this forum with your thank you to Tom, or else there would have been the possibility of me missing this completely.

 

And so now that I've discovered your thread, I too am now looking forward to perusing your father's website and these interviews he conducted.

 

Cheers!

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Thanks Dargo, I hope you enjoy.

 

And to those wondering, I should mention that these interviews average roughly 1 hour each in length. But some of them range anywhere from 20 minutes to 3hrs! :0 However I'll just be posting clips from them that I think people would find particularly interesting.

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Archive updated 7/16/13

 

An unaired interview in which James Arness discusses how John Wayne convinced him to join the cast of Gunsmoke.

 

Link to interview:

 

To browse our youtube channel: [www.youtube.com/orcodevelopment]

For further information on our archive: [www.orcodevelopment.org]

 

Thanks and enjoy classic movie fans :)

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Thanks very much, OrcoDev. It was nice to hear the sense of indebtedness that James Arness felt towards John Wayne for his career.

 

Your's father's affability as an interviewer, combined with his knowledge, must have really made those interviewed feel comfortable with him. That only helps the interviews.

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Archive Update: 7/21

 

Hello again classic movie fans, time for another update to our archive of previously unaired interviews. This time it's two ladies from the silent era of classic cinema.

 

First up it's Madge Bellamy. An interview in which she describes working with Mary Pickford and going to dinner parties with Charlie Chaplin: [Madge Bellamy|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMUrzIfw3OM]

 

Next it's Lina Basquette. She lived a fascinating and often tragic life, but here she describes how she was instrumental in getting Al Jolson his part in The Jazz Singer: [Lina Basquette|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVdtDhbgGGA]

 

Once again, I hope you enjoy.

For further information on our archive you can visit: http://www.orcodevelopment.org

Link to our youtube channel: [www.youtube.com/orcodevelopment]

 

Edited by: OrcoDev on Jul 21, 2013 12:13 PM

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Hi there classic movie fans,

 

I've added a fair amount of actors from our archive over the last couple of weeks. Is there anyone or any category you'd like to hear more from? Writers? Directors? Producers? Let me know here. Thanks and enjoy.

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Thanks once again, OrcoDec, for providing some segments of your father's interviews.

 

I wonder if the Madge Bellamy interview includes any reminiscences about either Bela Lugosi or White Zombie, the film for which she is probably best remembered today, even, though, at the time she was probably not happy about appearing in such a horror cheapie.

 

Fascinating to hear how Lina Basquette says she influenced the casting of Jolson in The Jazz Singer, (mind you, she was Mrs. Sam Warner), not to mention the fact that Jolson got into trouble when flirting with Ruby Keeler, then a gangster's girlfriend (I had no idea that Ruby had that wild side). Might that Basquette interview also include any mention about her working with DeMille in The Godless Girl, the director's last silent, or her relationship with Jack Dempsey?

 

Of the old time studio directors, might there be any interviews with the loquacious Vincent Sherman or, of course, Frank Capra? I assume that directors such as Raoul Walsh or Wild Bill Wellman were probably gone before your father had the chance to interview them. Of the stars, is there any chance of interviews with Vincent Price, Jane Russell or Olivia de Havilland, the latter still actually with us today.

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Good reccomendations Tom,

 

If I have time I'll listen to the Basquette interview for The Godless Girl and Jack Dempsey.

 

I checked our archive, and we do indeed have an interview with Vincent Sherman, and of course Capra participated as well being the inspiration for the course.

 

I'll look for the stars you mentioned, but in the meantime here's the aformentioned Olivia de Havilland discussing the movie for which she was Oscar Nominated, The Snake Pit [Olivia de Havilland|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJLiS983mPc&list=PLMPg4RkqBExamQ9SC8xjmojtPvoqwObEs&index=13]

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Hey there classic movie fans, another update to our archive of never before aired interviews with the biggest names in classic movies.

 

This time it's director Vincent Sherman in which he describes working with Humphrey Bogart and his attitude toward working in Hollywood: [Vincent Sherman|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewkEE8uaev4&feature=c4-overview&list=UU9WN8d-v_q1VtExSHgHFoWg]

 

Our youtube channel [www.youtube.com/orcodevelopment]

 

For further information [www.orcodevelopment.org]

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Thanks very much, OrcoDev, on producing part of that Vincent Sherman interview about working with Bogart, which included one of the silliest films of the actor's career, Return of Dr. X. Sherman got his years a little mixed up when he said that Bogie continued to work as a villain until 1946 or so, but that's no big deal.

 

By the way, does the Sherman interview including any references to Adventures of Don Juan, in which he directed Errol Flynn in the last major production of the actor's career? It's a massively underrated extremely handsome costume adventure with a delicious tongue-in-cheek flavour. I think it had to be the biggest production (though a troubled one because its star was going through personal issues) in which Sherman was ever in charge and, in my opinion, while few seem to acknowledge it as such, without doubt the highlight of the director's career as far as quality is concerned.

 

By the way, indictions are that Sherman rewrote history a bit whenever he talked about the Don Juan production. He always talked very sympathetically about Errol Flynn, saying that he was responsible on the set of the film until poor reviews of another film of his were released, and he then went off on a bender, delaying production on Don Juan. Flynn, in other words, largely got the blame by Sherman for the film's major problems.

 

Warners production notes since seen, however, by author Robert Matzen, now reveal that Flynn was working well on the film far longer than just a few weeks before he disappeared. And there are notes saying that the film was ALREADY behind production before Flynn disappeared because it was the director himself, Sherman, who had NOT been pulling this big production together the way the producers had hoped.

 

By the way, none of this shows on screen today. When you see the film, both director and star, working in unison, do an outstanding job, one of the best films either ever made, in my opinion.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRK4K44D8Q4dgSdDdpjiPe

 

Sherman directing Flynn in Don Juan

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Those are some intriguing points you bring up Tom, I'll have to listen to more of the interview to see if that's the case as it's quite extensive (over 3 hours long!). Sherman was apparently rather verbose.

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Update to archive 7-30-13

Hey classic movie fans, another update from my dad's archive of never before heard classic movie interviews he personally conducted. This time it's Academy Award Winner Sir John Mills discussing fellow Academy Award Winner Sir David Lean. I'm sure like many of you, David Lean is one of my favorite directors, infusing epic films with intimate moments. What are some of your favorite David Leans films? Listen, tell your friends, and enjoy.

 

Link: [sir John Mills on Sir David Lean|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CD-FZ4IyCkw]

 

Our Youtube channel: [www.youtube.com/orcodevelopment]

 

Info on our archive: [www.orcodevelopment.org]

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