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MON ONCLE a very funny film :)


FredCDobbs
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This is so funny! :)

 

It was made in 1958, and that time was just like this, with some people trying to fix up their modern home with modern gadgets, and the same at some businesses too, and with the odd modern art as part of the house and patio, and furniture too. :)

 

And so much of it was so ugly, such as that big fish fountain. LOL. This was the 1950s answer to the next step beyond Art Deco, but it failed. :)

 

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The furniture is wretched, but that house is killer!

 

A major theme in Tati's work is the inexorable supplanting of the old (France) with the modern, uniform, and sterile. Something he deplores. Notice at the opening the shots of construction sites, and at the end how workmen are demolishing old buildings, presumably to make way for modern stuff. In another movie of his, Playtime, you see different travel posters of major cities, all with pictures of the same box skyscraper, and monuments of the old Paris show up as mere reflections in cold plate glass windows.

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>A major theme in Tati's work is the inexorable supplanting of the old (France) with the modern, uniform, and sterile. Something he deplores. Notice at the opening the shots of construction sites, and at the end how workmen are demolishing old buildings, presumably to make way for modern stuff. In another movie of his, Playtime, you see different travel posters of major cities, all with pictures of the same box skyscraper, and monuments of the old Paris show up as mere reflections in cold plate glass windows.

 

Thanks for the information. I did notice all the American cars, but I didn't understand why they were tearing down that old building at the end.

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Mon Oncle is indeed a good film. I love how Tati wasn't afraid to just let the camera sit still, and let us observe all the gags and movement of his characters. You have to watch his films several times before you can notice all the things his different characters are doing in different parts of the screen.

 

The downside to Mon Oncle, is that it could have used better transitional scenes between the gags and set pieces. The film plods along too much.

 

The best Tati movie and probably the most amazing French film I've ever seen is Playtime. It's a difficult movie to enjoy, but is simply amazing in its conception and daring ambition. It takes the concept of Mon Oncle to a whole new level.

 

Tati was criticized, though, for making films that were too cold and mechanical, ironically, the very things that his films lampoon. I think it's a fair criticism. Then again, the character of Hulot is very likeable and human.

 

In any case, it takes a daring filmmaker to make the kinds of films he made, which is why he had trouble with financing Playtime and its probably why he made so few movies.

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(I don't know why I'm even bothering with the following as you apparently have me on ignore, BUT....)

 

>And so much of it was so ugly, such as that big fish fountain. LOL. This was the 1950s answer to the next step beyond Art Deco, but it failed.

 

Because you included that picture of that home in your thread, sorry, you couldn't be more wrong here, Fred...at least about the styles in architecture anyway. "Mid-Century Modern" has never been a "hotter" trend than since its first introduction over half a century ago now.

 

And so, while YOU may not like that style as much as the Deco styles of the pre-code movie era, to use the word "failed" in your premise would not be correct, but just an expression of your personal taste.

 

(...ya see folks, THIS is why Fred has me on ignore, 'cause he HATES IT whenever I correct his "errors" OR just disagrees with him!!!)

 

LOL

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>Mon Oncle is indeed a good film. I love how Tati wasn't afraid to just let the camera sit still, and let us observe all the gags and movement of his characters. You have to watch his films several times before you can notice all the things his different characters are doing in different parts of the screen.

 

Yes, I see something new every time I watch this film. I love those windows that look like eyes. :)

 

I saw PLAYTIME a few years ago when TCM aired it.

 

 

 

 

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"Mid-Century Modern" has never been "hotter".....

 

..in other words, Vintage '50s/'60s , it maybe 'hot' but it is also easy to find and affordable as opposed to Art Deco items .

 

I think Fred is right, Mid-Century Modern ( or Vintage 50s') does look like cheap knock-off of Art Deco, you can't compare the two. That would be like comparing a Volkswagen to a Mercedes.

 

I'm sure if Art Deco were plentiful And reasonable, it would overtake the '50s craze.

 

Twink

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>twinkee:

>It seemed odd to see so many American Cars in one area

 

I can't be totally certain, but it could be taken as a criticism of those French who displayed pretension buying American cars, seeking the status they conveyed. I noticed an early Corvette. Anyone else notice makes and models?

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Well Twink my dear, while I DO appreciate you being Fred's "mouthpiece" here..LOL..I gotta ask ya somethin': Have you priced an original in good to perfect shape Eames Chair lately???

 

Ya see, they're ANTHING but "cheap", either price-wise, style-wise OR construction-wise.

 

(...once again my dear, this is NOT a matter of Fred OR you being "right", but IS a matter of your own "personal taste", and NOT a matter of "failing" in either the marketplace OR even by some other's opinion, in "style")

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Yes, I know Eames Chairs and Mid Modern Danish Teak furniture is expensive, but they are the exception and not exactly flooding the market like a lot of 50s/60's stuff is, like plastic outdoor funiture and "Lava" lamps, I mean you cannot compare a "Lava" lamp to an ART DECO Lamp.

 

My point being, there is lots of cheap and reasonable 50s/60s stuff out there as opposed to Art Deco which was never made cheaply in the first place ! It's a matter of Quality as well as Style. An Eames chair is unique, but as far as style, still does not compare to any Art Deco chair.

 

To me, ART DECO Furniture And DECOR looks Glamorous And Sexy !

 

You can't possibly compare either, to '50s furniture Or '50s decor ?!

 

Twink

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I think you have a point Slay, it may have had something to do with pretention because it certainly would not have been practical to own a '50s boat in Paris as they were known to be gas guzzlers (gas is very expensive in Paris), as well, just driving one of those boats down a narrow side street in Paris would have been extremely difficult, let alone to park it. (People park half on the sidewalk & half on the street and think nothing of it.) Plus they drive like maniacs over there and a big car like that would have been in their way and just get honked at. The majority of cars in Paris are Citreons.

 

Anyway, the car he ended up buying looked like a '57 Chevy.

 

Twink

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Not to seem argumentative, twinkee, but part of the motivation of the modern (or was it post-modern?) movement was to provide style and refinement to lots of people at affordable prices. And the furniture was purposefully designed to lend itself to mass production. After all, the classic Eames 'paperclip' chair is just bent tubular steel with plywood for the seat and back. As a result, there is more of it around, and more copycats, leading to lower prices on the resale market. Additionally, art deco stuff is generally older than modernist stuff, so there is greater loss to time. Though scarcity and age don't always lead to higher prices, they can contribute to it.

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No one has as yet mentioned the music that accompanies and complements this exceptionally charming and unusual film.

Composed by Frank Barcellini (had to look that up), the score to *Mon Oncle* is at once traditionally "Parisienne" and child-like, and beautifully captures the film's mood. In some ways Tati is as innocent as his affectionate nephew, and as Bill Hader pointed out, his character is reminiscent of earlier silent clowns such as Keaton and Chaplin ( I feel, especially the latter.)

The music reflects this innocence. It reminded me a little of Nino Rota's work. Too bad this Frank Barcellini didn't score more movies.

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slayton, now I'm really confused. I looked up the music for *Mr. Hulot's Holiday* and read that it was composed by someone called "Alain Romans".Romans apparently also wrote the music for *Playtime*. Fair enough, but then it said that this Alains Romans also scored the music for *Mon Oncle*.

And I'd thought it was this Farnk Barcellini guy.

The music sounds very similar for all three films ...maybe Alain Romans and Frank Bercellini were one and the same person, but for reasons unknown, used two different names? There is very little information about either of them. Here's a link to a brief article about Alain Romans:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alain_Romans

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TCM also shows other Tati films, including Mr Hulot's Holiday, Jour de Fete, and Playtime. All have the same stamp of the Tati style, and are just as enjoyable. There is also another film he made, called Trafic, which I would like very much for TCM to show.

 

misswonderly, this is what I get from IMDB for the music:

 

Jour de Fete---Jean Yatove

 

Mon Oncle, Mr. Hulot's Holiday--Alain Romans

 

Playtime--Francis Lemarque

 

Trafic--Charles Dumont

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  • 3 years later...

TCM also shows other Tati films, including Mr Hulot's Holiday, Jour de Fete, and Playtime. All have the same stamp of the Tati style, and are just as enjoyable. There is also another film he made, called Trafic, which I would like very much for TCM to show.

 

misswonderly, this is what I get from IMDB for the music:

 

Jour de Fete---Jean Yatove

 

Mon Oncle, Mr. Hulot's Holiday--Alain Romans

 

Playtime--Francis Lemarque

 

Trafic--Charles Dumont

 

I was archiving and found this, really good comments about Tati films. There have been several of them and an extremely good one maybe about the time of this one. It was initiated by cc baxter and CasablancaViews also posted a lot there. The latter will surely remember it.

 

I resurrected this thread because I want to answer the above post. I bought the entire music to Tati films on iTunes (I believe it was only 5-6 bucks.) It contains 36 cuts from all the movies, including all the above though there may be a name missing (above). It's amazing that all of the composers have this similar style, something that Tati was apparently looking for and got it from all of them. MissW refers to Mon Oncle as a charming film and it is, but I would characterize all of this music the same way. Very charming, happy, invoking a kind of innocence, childlike in a fun way, and with a sometimes carnival feel to it. It's totally captivating when listening to it sans movie and as a little concert. It's all in mono but have no fear, the sound is exceptional.

 

The album title is ... Sonorama ... at least it can be found on iTunes that way. I'm sure it's available on Amazon and elsewhere. 

 

Google: Sonorama Tati

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OY!

 

So, I'm guessing we should change the name of the boards to TCT( Turner classic Threads) ?

 

Sepiatone

 

Prior to the last upgrade, there was a rule about this. If a thread was more than a year old, no new posts. The Mods were the ones who enforced it, it wasn't embedded in the software. But if recent experience here on the Board is any guide, this rule in not currently in effect.

 

So, OY, it's at least fair. I felt it was justified. There was a point under discussion and I felt I could offer some information. With all the new threads that pop up all the time. some of them frivolous, the resurrection of an oldie here and there should not be a disturbance among reasonable people.

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