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Steve Mcqueen


crazyblonde7
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Steve McQueen will be on the 9th I believe. I love this guy! BULLITT, THE GETAWAY, THE TOWERING INFERNO, THE SAND PEBBLES, THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THE GREAT ESCAPE,THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR, ECT... He was handsome, sexy and exciting. A great cowboy too, check out his series- WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE. Anyone else like Steve?

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> {quote:title=crazyblonde7 wrote:}{quote}Steve McQueen will be on the 9th I believe. I love this guy! BULLITT, THE GETAWAY, THE TOWERING INFERNO, THE SAND PEBBLES, THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THE GREAT ESCAPE,THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR, ECT... He was handsome, sexy and exciting. A great cowboy too, check out his series- WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE. Anyone else like Steve?

McQueen was alright and he knew who to look to in terms of inspiration. He once said of John Wayne "When I want to know how to act tough, *I just look at The Duke*". :D His last film The Hunter where he plays Ralph Papa Thorson gets no respect but it has lot of great action scenes mixed with humor in it. It's far from a bad film imo. TCM oughta show it sometime.

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>And even though it gets a bad rap, I was always kind of fond of Soldier In The Rain . Is that one not available to TCM?

 

I remember it being shown within the last year on TCM, Sepia.

 

Remembering not being that impressed with it though having hadn't watched it in decades, I thought I'd give it another shot, and yeah I have say I kinda got into it.

 

McQueen of course is playing against type(or at least what would later become known as his type, anyway) and a character that would have probably been given to, say, a young Earl Holliman as a little slow on the ol' uptake type. However, once I accepted him in that role, I thought he was quite good in this film.

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Yeah, well, that "type" would've been hard to play by anyone, I'd say.

 

(...I mean, unlike the character McQueen is saddled with playing, if I were the young man that had gotten the gorgeous Natalie Wood pregnant, first, I'm SURE I would have remembered her, and secondly, I wouldn't have hesitated for a minute in professing my undying love for her and asking her to marry me!!!)

 

;)

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Yeah, as I recall it was his over consumption of the alcohol that caused him to not remember her.

 

(...though I still don't care HOW blitzed I would've been, if I wouldn't have remembered a night with the gorgeous Natalie, then just take me out and shoot me on the spot!!!)

 

LOL

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Late in his career, after he made The Towering Inferno but before he made Tom Horn, Steve McQueen made a version of the Ibsen play An Enemy Of The People. Made around 1978 this film was barely released.

I've never seen it. I caught a glimpse of it years ago on a local stations late movie, but it was in the middle. Has anyone out there seen this film? Would it be good for TCM?

 

Edited by: sfpcc1 on Aug 6, 2013 7:36 PM

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ENEMY FOR THE PEOPLE was released last year on Warner Video DVD. The recently passed away Charles Durning is in the movie. Even though many don't like this movie because it's not a typical Mcqueen movie, I thought is was good. Yes, I like Mcqueen the action star but he does a convincing job in this movie. I thought he was excellent! Good story too. TCM should show it.

 

 

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My tastes tend to skew to earlier decades, so I'm not as familiar with McQueen's films, but, for those who haven't seen it, I did want to share this episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents (one of two featuring McQueen) - "Man from the South":

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cz7vMJBKCnc

 

One of my favorite entries of the series, and worth a look if only to see McQueen and Peter Lorre share a screen! :P

 

Random, useless info :) - the director is Norman Lloyd (who you probably remember as Hitchcock's titular Saboteur) and the leading lady is Neile Adams, McQueen's first wife.

 

 

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I don't understand why *The Hunter* , his last film, ever gets such poor reviews. I think it has a nice blend of action and comedy and allows Steve McQueen to show a little more humanity in his screen persona. And considering he's pushing 50 years of age (and also sadly near the end of his life) he is quite active in the filming. I wish they had *Baby, The Rain Must Fall* on the schedule, a pretty good film and I could see my gal Lee Remick (pretty good herself).

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In a DICK CAVETT interview, actress SALLY STRUTHERS, who was in McQueen's *The Getaway* , related that during the scene where McQueen punches her in the face, that while shooting, Struthers missed her mark, and McQueen actually punches her in the face! She said it hurt like hell, but she still considered it an honor!

 

 

Why, I myself, had I ever gotten punched hard enough from McQueen to have a tooth or two knocked out, would to this day be wearing those teeth on a NECKLACE!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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Also being bypassed on Natalie Wood Day is THIS PROPERTY IS CONDEMNED, which is another Paramount movie just as LOVE WITH THE PROPER STRANGER is.

 

 

I'm pretty sure TCM has shown THIS PROPERTY IS CONDEMNED before. I seem to remember tuning in during the middle of the movie a few years ago.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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McQueen was also an expert with any prop that he had to use on film. It wasn't all natural talent though. He practiced with his sawed off rifle on Wanted: Dead or Alive until his hands bled. He and the rest of the Magnificent Seven perfected their fast draws contantly on set. He learned the guitar for Baby the Rain Must Fall, practiced swinging an ax for Sand Pebbles and bounced that baseball for hours on the set of Great Escape.

 

It took work to make it look effortless.

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AND, he really wanted to do the barbed wire motorcycle jump in "The Great Escape" TOO as you probably know and COULD have done it also, but the producers of the film told him, no way Harvey Mushman(his motorcycle racing pseudonym), and so he called his racing buddy and stunt rider Bud Ekins and asked him to do it...which he did.

 

(...this is mentioned just in case there might be some folks around here who still think it was Steve that did that famous motorcycle jump)

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Dargo, according to Robert Relyea's autobiography - Not so Quiet on the Set -on the last day of McQueen's shooting on the film, Ekins jumped the wire first, followed by McQueen who did so just to show he could. Additionally, an Australian rider who was mutual friends with both Ekins and McQueen suited up and also made the jump. Relyea thinks that it's Ekins in the movie, but also says it could be the anonymous Australian.

 

Relyea's book is both intimate and hilarious. He also served as A.D. on Wayne's The Alamo, The Magnificent Seven, West Side Story and was McQueen's partner in Solar Productions.

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