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SINCE WHEN IS JOAN FONTAINE, BRITISH


cody1949
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It appears you copy pasted what you put here from Wikipedia BUT decided to drop the "American' part. They say 'British American; which is someone that is an American citizen but with British parents.

 

But she is NOT a British actress. Fontaine is an American actress in that she was signed by an American studio (RKO), and stared in American made movies. But she often did play a British character.

 

 

 

 

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What TCM said about Joan isn't incorrect just sloppy. Joan's heritage is British, while her nationality is American.

 

Same with my mom; Her heritage is Japanese but she is an American citizen. So it is correct when I say my mom is Japanese and when I say she is American. Just depends on if one is talking about heritage or nationality.

 

Anyhow, we agree that Joan is gorgeous in From This Day Forward. To me that is what matter! :)

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TCM said she is a British actress. She is an American actress whose ancestors came from England. Yes, she played parts that were identified as English, but she is not an English actress. She made her mark in American movies not English movies. Case closed.

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> {quote:title=cody1949 wrote:}{quote} She is an American actress whose ancestors came from England.

Ancestors?

 

Both her mother and father were born in the United Kingdom. Joan, along with her sister, Olivia, were both born in Tokyo, Japan. They went to school in California while their father remained in Tokyo as a patent lawyer. How, exactly, does this make them American actresses? Could it be because of their typical American accents?

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I wish they'd clear up a lot of the legalities with Joan's 40s films from Paramount and Universal that have never been shown on TCM. I would love to see The Affairs of Susan (with my honey, George Brent!); You Gotta Stay Happy and Kiss the Blood Off My Hands, a noir with Burt Lancaster I saw on the late, late show many years ago...........

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Hi hueriger

 

 

Both of Joan Fontaine's parents were British so therefore,so of course that would make her British, certainly British blood (her father happened to be working in Japan when she was born and her mother happened to be visiting him). The fact she became an ' American' citizen does not take away that she has British blood.

 

 

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Olivia and Joan were cousins of the man who created the famous deHavilland aircraft used by the British military. Although the girls were born in Japan I don't believe they had any claim to have Japanese citizenship (maybe if they lived their whole lives there they would have been granted it). They were British citizens, and even though they spent much of their lives living and working in the US they were still in fact British, until they would apply for American citizenship. So interestingly what is their current status; dual citizenship, or what?

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Like I posted below, Wikipedia took the easy way out and says she is 'British American'.

 

One can make a good case for either one, (depending on if one is referencing heritage, citizenship, or in the case of 'actress' where they did their work as an actress. So the easy way out may just be the way to go!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Well ya know folks, we COULD settle this once and for all IF we could just find Joan's email address and ask her how if she spells the following words: "color", "labor", "favorite" and say "neighbor".

 

(...'cause of course IF she spells 'em with that there superfluous letter 'u', then I THINK we'll know if she's more Brit than Yank!!!) ;)

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Darg, that might confuse some into thinking she's CANADIAN!

 

 

Fontaine became British the day she decided to become an actress. British, or any OTHER nationality the studio required.

 

 

And I didn't know WWII started in 1935...my history books in school credited 1939 as the starting point!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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Well, there was an address on the web for Joan somewhere (for autographs). Unsure where it is. If anyone wants to write and ask her (I'm not all that interested.....) wether she's still a citizen of the U.K.....

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This seems to be the only current thread about Joan Fontaine, so, regardless of her nationality, I'm going to talk about a couple of her movies.

 

Has everyone seen both *The Constant Nymph* and *Letter from an Unknown Woman* ? Yes? If not, get out of here if you worry about "spoilers".

 

 

Has anyone noticed the similarities between these two movies? Let me count the ways:

These apply to both:

 

 

1. Joan plays a very young (16?) girl at the film's outset, her hair in schoolgirlish braids or barrettes, her lithe limbs flying around like lithe limbed young girls do. She is innocent, exuberant, passionate, and coltish (the lithe limbed part). She convinces you she is 16 (although in *The Constant Nymph* (1943) she would have been 25 or so, and in *Letter from an Unknown Woman* ('48) she'd have hit 30).

 

 

2 Joan falls in love with a classical pianist - not just a musician, but a composer as well.

 

 

3.Joan doesn't just fall in love; she dedicates her life to her beloved composer, nothing else matters. (well, in "Letter", her son also matters, but that is because he is the result of her and her composer's love) Also, her love for the man, and her love for the man's music, is so intermingled, it's hard to tell between the two.

 

 

4. Joan's purity - and I don't really mean sexual purity, I mean her honest soul - and natural intelligence, as well as her love of music, render her the ideal love for this musician, as she can intuit what they need to do, musically speaking.

In short, she is clearly their muse.

 

 

5. But they don't know that (Joan is their muse) until it is too late.

 

 

6. Joan dies, but not before she has somehow made her beloved realize how much she loved him, and what an inspiration she would have been for him.

 

 

I think there are even more common elements to these two films than the above, but 6 is enough, I guess.

Anyone else struck by the similarity in story and character these two movies share?

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