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Ann Blyth Friday Night


Hibi
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Did anyone watch? I had no idea they were going to use parts of her festival interview before and after the scheduled movies! Why didnt TCM publicize that on the website???? Missed opportunity. I skipped Mildred Pierce because I've seen it so many times and tuned in later. Did she have anything interesting or new to relate to Mildred??? Had I known I would've tuned in for that! :(

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They also showed Our Very Own, the one were Ann learns she is adopted. Also with Farley Granger as her boyfriend and an interesting turn by Jane Wyatt as her pre-Margaret Anderson mother. After the initial revelation Blyth procedes to act like a uh a...bee-otch. Fun parts for me is the assembling of the new family TV set and daddy finally slapping her one...which seems to bring her to her senses for her high school graduation ceremony none too soon. :)

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Yeah, I've seen that one. Too bad the Helen Morgan Story was shown so early in the morning. (I think a TCM premiere) but I did record it and watched it Saturday. Early Paul Newman role. Standard Hollywood bio movie complete with Hollywood ending, but Ann was good in it. I saw it many years ago on the late show......It was Ann's last film.

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To answer your initial question here Hibi, Bob's interview with Miss Blyth about her experience on the "Mildred Pierce" set and her interplay with Joan Crawford was pretty much a reiteration of what she says on the TCM Original Joan Crawford Tribute short in which Miss Blyth supplies the narrative.

 

Nope, I don't recall any new revelations made during the interview.

 

(...gotta say though that Bob was right about Ann's appearance...she looked GREAT for an 84 y/o)

 

Edited by: Dargo2 on Aug 19, 2013 9:24 AM

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Where was *The World in His Arms?* Since Gregory Peck was in this with her it would have been a perfect bridge from his day to hers. I haven't seen this in quite a while and loved it when I saw it on a double bill with *Bend of the River* back in 1961. The icing on the cake: it was a "second run" theater and I got in for $.50. Those really were the days!

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"The World in His Arms"---I had forgotten all about that movie. Like you, I'd love to see it again. A couple of her other movies that I haven't seen in many years are "I'll Never Forget You" with Tyrone Power, and a rather obscure family film called 'Sally and St. Anne." Such a beautiful actress, and I'm glad to know that she still looks terrific. And I think she made a number of musicals for Universal early in her career. I've never seen any of these, but I'd surely love to. I hope she know how many fans she still has.

 

Terrence.

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In the prison flick I'd say you're right, finance. However, in "Slander" I'd say her screen time is probably on a par with Johnson's or Cochran's.

 

And to be frank myself here, before her SUTS day, I might have agreed with you about her 'deserving' this tribute, but after watching or re-watching a few of her films that day, I had a slight change of heart after noticing she did seem to carry enough of the load in many of the movies she was in and enough to maybe 'deserve' her day in the TCM spotlight....and even though I was never the biggest fan of hers.

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I agree. She certainly carried her role to the max in *Mildred Pierce* , *Our Very Own* and *The Helen Morgan Story* and *Kismet*. Ann Blyth is a huge suopporter of TCM, goes to the Film Festivals, allows TCM interviews and she's still with us to share her stories. Definitely worthy of SUTS day.

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My first sentence mentions 4 films that she certainly played hers roles great in.,so that conclusion you're jumping to is false.

 

It's true that she's been a great supporter of TCM, has intresting stories to tell, and she is still one of the few remaining Classic Stars, so that makes her especially precious to anyone who loves classic films. I can't imagine anyone playing the role of Veda better than Ann Blyth did, and that's one of the most important films of the 1940's. I enjoyed her films, and glad she had her SUTS day.

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I agree with you with regards to "maybe 'deserve' her day in the TCM spotlight"; i.e. it is a close call.

 

But for SUTS, many of the actors are close calls in that these actor rarely had movies produced for (around), them. She also didn't make any films after she was 29. The period for an actress of being around 26 - 35 is when many actresses made some of their best movies.

 

Blyth was clearly a second tier star, at best.

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Can't disagree with anything you just wrote, James.

 

It's just that in these sorts of "close calls", I think "erring" on the side of the star's behalf isn't such a bad thing in almost all cases, and especially if these second tier stars did actually headline some lesser known or little remembered films during their careers.

 

(...and in fact, some of those "lesser known or little remembered films" are sometimes what puts the "fun" in this whole SUTS thing, because those tend to be the films which are a little less shown on TCM, and occasionally they turn out to be a "pleasant surprise" to discover or rediscover)

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If you notice many of Ann Blyth film's did NOT star or co/star B tier actors. She appeared in many films with A List actors. Look at the cast of Mildred Pierce, The Helen Morgan Story (Paul Newman) Kismet (Howard Keel) Our Very Own (Farley Granger). I agree Dargo, when the lesser known littler films are shown, the are like new dicoveries. and I also agree I'd rather err on the side of the Star. Whether or not finance agrees, there is something to be said in honoring an actor when they are still alive, to appreciate that honor TCM gives them.

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They also showed Our Very Own, the one were Ann learns she is adopted.

 

 

This movie had a profound effect on me when I saw it. I hated the premise, that being adopted was somehow disgraceful and caused all kinds of trauma. When my husband and I adopted our children in England, we were told by the administrator at the adoption agency that they had two unwritten laws for adoptive parents: First, that the children had to be told they were adopted right away, so that the word became part of the furniture, so to speak, no secrets, no nonsense about plane crashes or traffic accidents; and second, that we had to take at least two children and not just one. They didn't want the kids growing up alone. We agreed heartily, and our kids never had a time when they didn't know they were adopted. It was perfectly all right with them from their earliest days. A perfect situation, from our standpoint.

 

Once I was on a plane sitting next to a little lady from the Philippines. We were chatting, and she asked if I had any children. I didn't, at that time, and told her so. She said, "What? Won't your sisters give you any?" Apparently it was customary in the Philippines at that time to share children in the family. I told her it wasn't our custom, and she was surprised.

 

Anyway, I felt this picture was unnecessarily pessimistic and I never liked it.

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Ditto. She deserved her SUTS day. And the Festival interview of her was just icing on the cake.

 

Besides there are supporting actors who get SUTS days. Like today. Hattie McDaniel! Maybe not all of Ann's films were built around her, but she played leading roles........

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She may have retired from films, but she did appearances on tv (as recently as the 1980s in Murder, She Wrote) and on stage in summer stock. She mentioned in one of the snippets she had turned down The 3 Faces of Eve and regretted it.......

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Btw Dothery, I couldn't agree more with your take on "Our Very Own".

 

Being adopted as an infant myself 61 years ago now, one of my earliest recollections was of my parents telling me of my adoption, and the manner in which they explained it to me.

 

The way they did it was to almost make it sound as if I was 'extra special' and wanted by them to such a great degree that it instilled a lifelong 'pride'(for want of a better word) in the circumstances of my becoming a member of the family.

 

(...and thus I TOO remember thinking the very same thing as you the first time I watched this flick when I was about 14 or 15 y/o on some movie matinee TV program in L.A....yep, I remember thinkin' somethin' along the lines of: "WHAT the hell is wrong with this Blyth chick? Hey you spoiled brat, get OVER IT already and be PROUD of your parents!")

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Well as we have discussed many times before that if movie plots didn't play up false (or over the top) drama there would be no need for the movie to being with.

 

Take My Favorite Wife; While there are some funny scenes the basis of the plot is very annoying to me. That basis is that everyone feels a need to hide something when there is no need to hide it.

 

Grant should of told his new bride; hey, my first wife is alive after all. I?m confused. I need time to think.

 

Dunne should of told Grant; I?m still in love with you and want be your wife and have the life we had before.

 

But of course then there wouldn?t be a need for a movie.

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True, and good points all. However, in a screwball comedy such as "My Favorite Wife", I've always thought these sorts of plot points to be much more acceptable to overlook than in dramas. In fact, you're almost forced to accept them in screwball comedies in order to appreciate the films at all.

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