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Hattie McDaniel Part Deux


hamradio
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Sometimes this link works and sometimes it doesn?t, and there is a commercial before the film clip. Anyway, it is the scene where Mammy and Melanie walk up the stairs after Bonnie was killed. McDaniel is exceptionally good in this scene

 

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/an-BwpfbJJJJJhbJmm/gone_with_the_wind_1939_awfull_tragedy/

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Well actually ham, I'm sorry to report to you that I already pretty much took care of all this this very morning, and when I started the "To answer your question, MissW" thread.

 

http://forums.tcm.com/thread.jspa?threadID=170665&start=75&tstart=0

 

BUT, seein' as how THAT one has seemed to "devolve" into a thread where I am once again kiddin' around with people who MAY or MAY NOT quite "appreciate" my brand of humor, then I suppose this new one of yours here might not be such a bad idea after all!

 

(...though I DO have a word of warning for ya here, ol' buddy...as SOON as a few people around here might start talkin' about how put-upon THEY are in life because of some distinguishing feature of theirs, do NOT be surprised at all at how quickly YOUR thread here will "devolve" ALSO!!!) ;)

 

LOL

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Nice link there, ham! Good work! And I hope it does work in that regard for ya in this thread of yours....keeping it civil, that is.

 

(...because the talented Hattie deserves being remembered and appreciated for her work in all fields of entertainment, and NOT as just some "representative")

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I haven't read the entire thread, forgive me. But I wanted to respond to a couple of points brought up. And I have read GWTW several times, it's a very detailed book.

 

If they made GWTW today, you betcha it would highlight titillating interracial sex, and brutal violence-that's what sells. The book was like the movie with no mention of either. You could glean a little from the dialogue, "..that white trash Slattery girl" using your imagination. That's what they did when there was the Hays Code-got creative.

 

The book, as does the '39 movie depicts blacks and whites the same-some strong, some weak...it shows the charactor's strengths and flaws, their social status or job being part of their charactor. I remember being surprised when Polk says, "I don't know nothing about farming, I'm a house servant" which I interpret as dignity and pride.

 

Hattie McDaniel is a splendid choice for a stamp. She brought entertainment to thousands through her art, her creativity & talent. What's wrong with that? I know I'd rather see Bela Lugosi on a stamp representing Hungarians, much more so than The Gabors or Vlad the Impaler.

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*There is a reason the first version of this thread is gone. Any type of inflammatory comment, racial or otherwise, will NOT be tolerated under any circumstances. If you have any doubt about something you are going to post, you should not post at all. There will be NO further warnings.*

 

*TCMWebAdmin*

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Does anyone remember Hattie in "The Mad Miss Manton"? Even though she plays Stanwyck's maid, she does not allow anyone to talk down to her. When Stanwyck reminds her that she has guests, Hattie responds, "Well, I didn't invite them!" A classic line.

 

Terrence.

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Tiki, even though the movie is over 30 years old, one only needs to watch the ridiculous "Mandingo" to get a gist of what GWTW would look like if made today. African Americans would have you believe that pre-civil war slave owners were bloodthirsty, sadistic maniacs who spent the crux of their leisure time terrorizing their slaves. White "extremists" would try to sell the idea that those same slave owners were benevolent, "doting uncle' types that felt some pride in providing food, work and shelter to their "darkies".

 

Alex Haley's research in "Roots" showed that the truth lay somewhere in between, with a lot of "wiggle room" for individual behavior.

 

And I always thought Vlad the Impaler was Romanian, NOT Hungarian, but looked it up to be sure. Seems we were BOTH right! In Vlad's time, Romania was part of the vast Empire of Hungary.

 

Sepiatone

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Terrence1 wrote:

<< Even though she plays Stanwyck's maid, she does not allow anyone to talk down to her.>>

 

Louise Beavers was a lot like that. Let's not forget the movie "Imitation of Life" (1934) which was ahead of its time portraying blacks in a positive role.

 

imitation-of-life-3.jpg

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TCMWebAdmin, please delete any inflammatory post early on so it won't devolved. I'm hoping this thread will give others who are civil a second chance to discuss her and other actors like Louise Beavers.

 

Don't let it get to the point where the entire thread has to be deleted.

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One thing that becomes apparent reading narratives of escaped slaves is the intense and sickening undercurrent of fear that shot through southern society. Something that does not transmit through other media, like film. The white population was acutely aware of slave revolts in the Caribbean, and that the successful ones resulted in the massacre of the former slave owners. A severe and unrelenting program of violent repression to prevent that was seen as vital to their security. I have speculated that the elaborate courtliness and courtesy of southern culture was a response to that violence as a means of preventing it from destroying white social order.

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Part 2 threads have typically suffered a similar fate as locked or deleted Part 1 threads, leaving banned posters in their wake.

 

 

The exception being the wake of the red witch. Its displacement was minimal and band posters were forbidden in the ship's cabins. Naval regulations, ya know.

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The only problem I saw with Hattie's day was the amount of time she had on screen. All told, it probably amounted, in *all* those movies, to 60 minutes, if that much.

 

She outshone so many of the 'stars' in many of the movies, many of which were unwatchable.

 

On Louise, outside of the lovely and beautiful Cary Grant in Mr. Blandings, her line 'if you ain't eatin' Wham, you ain't eatin' ham!' is the best part of the movie.

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Finance, you're on to something.

 

If I were a playwrite, I'd write something like a "one woman" play about Hattie, in which the actress chosen to portray McDaniel describes her life, her history in entertainment, and her motives for doing what she's done and all of it. I'm sure there's enough material out there that can be researched and mined that will provide enough of McDaniel's own real thoughts, and not rely on the author's "creative license" which might foreward an agenda.

 

Sepiatone PS: I thought Whitmore's one man Will Rogers show was better.

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A play about McDaniel's life would have the same 'issue' that caused the initial fuss around here; what 'slant' would such a play have? Who would be the audience for such a play? The African American community is much divided with regards to her career. The portion in that community (the majority?) that views her as an ?uncle tom? would insist the play reflect that part of her. It wouldn?t be pretty.

 

A play that downplayed the ?issue? would be rejected. I don?t see how a play could be written about her that would NOT ?forward an agenda?. Therefore I still wonder if people that are not part of her ?community? understand the emotions she invokes within said community, when they assume a play could be written with her as the topic without an ?agenda?.

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The play about Hattie would be ABOUT Hattie, and her recollections on the topics you mention. Probably based on old interviews, recalled conversations from old friends and family members, letters and the like. The target audience would be anyone with an open mind. Although I DO agree that many would attend the play with preset notions, and judge the play on the merits of whether or not the play CATERS to those notions or not.

 

Sepiatone

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Well actually James, these very thoughts of yours here came to MY mind as well and as I was typing my positive response to Sepia and his idea.

 

However, I was thinkin' more along the lines that because of what I've heard about Hattie being such a gentle soul and not normally inclined to tell people who REALLY needed to hear her tell 'em to GO JUMP IN THE FREAKIN' LAKE if they didn't like what roles she was offered and took, then Sepia's suggestion of this "one-women show" probably wouldn't be ANYWHERE as much fun as watchin' ANYONE play Harry S. Truman and/or Mark Twain, and of course in which both of those gentlemen in THEIR one-man plays do a WHOLE LOT of!

 

(...and of which were always MY favorite parts of THOSE plays, as you might well suspect!) ;)

 

LOL

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To me it appears that Sepia's idea for a play would be like the book GWTW; A white washed version of actual events. I find that ironic.

 

Note that the NAACP held protests against GWTW and the characters McDaniel played in movie after movie. Would that be left out because that would be negative? I find the idea of a play built around McDaniel very interesting but only if it dealt with the serious topics.

 

To me there wouldn?t be enough to write about unless these serious topics were the focus of the play.

 

Also, when Sepia talks about having an open mind when going to the play he envisions; well actually people with an open mind would be willing to see a play that addresses these serious issues related to McDaniel and one that might portray some of her actions in a negative light. (i.e. to me having an open mind means taking in the good and bad).

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