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Natalie Wood's Death


perryartemas
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Natalie Wood?s death:

 

After hearing, for the past many, many, years about Natalie Wood?s death at Catalina Island?s Isthmus, one dark night in November, 1981, I feel compelled to make a comment:

Having only once dared the trip from Marina Del Rey in our 36' Chris Craft, the Teri-L in the mid 60's, we had a threatening experience, mid day, bright sun, anchored out in the channel on the lee side of the island. The frightening experience of trying to get into our Sabot shore boat was an experience I prefer not to face again. The small swells bounced the boat up and down and repeatedly banged it against the hull of the cruiser.

As a Merchant Seaman, on a troop ship during the spring of 1945 - on our way to finish the invasion of Okinawa with our troops, I had several occasions to go over the side and into 22 foot life boats during drills at each of four island stops on our route. The ocean bouncing the lifeboat against the hull of the ship took great care to climb aboard. Never, never was that experience as frightening as trying to get ashore from the Teri-L at Catalina that day.

I can only guess what problems Natalie might have encountered, been drinking, heavily dressed for November, on the ocean late at night, trying to get ashore in their shore boat.

Ironically, my ex-wife sang for Natalie in two films: ?The Great Race? and ?Inside Daisy Clover.?

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Interesting stuff here, Perry. And yeah, definitely something to ponder, alright.

 

But tell me...Your friend R.J. didn't happen to ask you to post this here recollection o' yours 'cause he's just heard they're about to open up the investigation to that whole thing one MORE time again, did HE??? ;)

 

LOL

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I don't know a whole lot about the death of Natalie Wood. So here's what I think probably happened.

 

Everyone on the boat had a lot to drink. There were arguements and fights. I think she was pushed off the boat and left to drown.

The official story makes no sense. Natalie would've never gone near the water. She was terrified of water her whole life.

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Sorry dark, but your scenario sounds more like the plot of a LIFETIME movie.

 

I'm resigned to accept it all as a tragic accident until iron-clad proof of otherwise emerges. Since I wasn't there, and don't personally know ANY of the principals involved, I can't do otherwise.

 

MY only question is, if she was SO afraid of the water, WHY did she get on the boat to begin with?

 

Sepiatone

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Here's my take. Natalie was a troubled woman with a drinking problem. There was a fight and rather than wait for someone to take her to shore, she thought she would risk it on her own. She'd probably left angry at many social gatherings when drinking too much. Therefore, no one thought about searching for her--they probably didn't even know she'd attempted to leave. When someone went to wake her the next day, she's missing. I think the boat captain is trying to cover his negligence. Her sister can blame all the people she wants, but it was an accident possibly caused by her own problems that had nothing to do with Wagner or Walken.

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You are mixing two very different things.

 

Of course one has to make a decision based on the information they have, when a situation calls for a decision.

 

None of us here has to make any decision with regards to an event like Wood's death. i.e. we are NOT required to form an opinion (unlike the DAs overs the years). Therefore I don't form an opinion when I'm not required to make a decision and when I find little evidence to assist me in forming one.

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Of course, it all depends on who and what certain opinions are based on. My sister in law based an opinion on the character of barmaids based on what she knew about ONE particular barmaid, without realizing my MOTHER was once a barmaid, too.

 

Had to straighten her out.

 

Sepiatone

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Hey drednm, if your NEXT one is gonna be the old one about "the only wood that doesn't float", then ya better know RIGHT NOW that much like there still are people around who after all this time find absolutely NO humor whatsoever to be mined in the occurrences which took place inside Ford's Theater back in 1865, there are still people around HERE who'll find your post lacking in taste and will let you know about it!

 

(...trust me, I have firsthand experience in this matter from WAY back!!!)

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No liky? Then don't read what I post. Last time I looked we still had freedom of speech.... So you can save your sanctimonious lecture for someone who cares ... if you can find someone.

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Well drednm, I suppose I can now add YOU to my long list of people around here who don't quite "get" my brand of humor eithier, HUH?!

 

LOL

 

'Cause dude, my previous post wasn't meant to be a " sanctimonious lecture" but WAS in fact meant to be a little tweak to the nose of people who can't find it in themselves to appreciated the "finer aspects" of "dark comedy"!

 

(...and here I would've thought any guy with apparently as little breeding and good taste as I have would've caught the joke here!!!)

 

LOL

 

Edited by: Dargo2 on Aug 27, 2013 11:15 AM

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dredmn, Think you may have misunderstood Dargo's intentions with his post. Quite awhile back dargo was asked NOT to make Natalie jokes when the investigation of her death was first reopened, since he did post a joke. He was just letting you know that he was kind of slapped on the wrist and didn't want you to get that same type of post. He wasn't lecturing you, he thought he was giving some friendly advice from his past experience.

Some here loved Natalie Wood and don't think anything about her untimely death was funny. But to each his own.

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