Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Worse original programming?


Recommended Posts

>LMREO! Well put.........

 

Thanks.

 

>Does this guy teach film classes? (I'm willing to bet he does......)

 

Well, then I certainly HOPE they sell "No-Doze" at the campus store wherever he might teach over there then!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, it pretty much has the same effect on you as when Drew opens her mouth during "The Essentials" and does her Valley Girl thing, EH?!

 

(...'cause THAT'S exactly how I feel about it TOO...though of course in HER case they've coined a phrase for that: "Vocal Fry"!!!)

 

LOL

Link to post
Share on other sites

I firmly believe that most movies made then, as now, were just MOVIES. Just to tell an amusing, or poignant story, and nothing more. That some self important psuedo intellectual reads something MORE that really isn't there is THAT person's issue, and not neccessarily so.

 

Unless there is documentation FROM the particular artist stating "this scene is really my saying that...", and that documentation is mentioned when trying to point it out in such a presentation, I'll contend that much of what's said is hogwash.

 

But this happens in everyday life. There were a few occaisions when I myself would tell someone, "So-and-so is this type of person"( the type of person I said they were was NOT an insult). Eventually, "so-and-so" would angrily confront me with, "I knew what you REALLY meant by that!" when actually, I didn't mean what he THOUGHT I meant at all. I meant what I said literally.

 

These "film analysts" remind me of that.

 

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites

*Hibi said:*

*I've had many a chuckle when reading bios about film people when they talk about a particular film or scene and how later film critics later point out this and that about a film or scene when there was no intention behind it when it was made........*

 

 

Watch what happens here when Cousins tries to impose his views on De Palma and Polanski about their own films:

 

 

Full disclosure here: whoever put this up did some fooling around with the clip at first, to make Cousins sound more droning, but it stops after a while and lets him make a fool of himself on his own.

Link to post
Share on other sites

*Dargo2 said:*

*"That rare breed: The Hollywood intellectual".*

 

As if the movie industry should have a greater percentage of intellectuals than any other industry? The early moguls might not have had the college degrees, but they were street smart and knew the potential audience better than the intellectuals who tend to make films for themselves.

 

That's fine if you're putting up your own money, but film is a collaborative medium and that includes the money man, like it or not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Sepia, I'm not so sure one could rightly apply the term "pseudo-intellectual" to his contention that because the European and in particular the Soviet directors of the time focused upon the more "downbeat" aspects of the human condition, and thus THAT would make THEM "more intellectual". I just think the poor kid has been hoodwinked into believing that because the culture on THAT continent has been decidedly more "dour" than on THIS continent, that somehow THAT imbues someone more inclined to examine the negatives of the world in a more intellectual manner.

 

(...I mean, YOU know how those Russians are ESPECIALLY, right?!...if somebody doesn't die by the end of the story, then it "obviously" isn't "the truth" in THEIR minds!!!)

 

LOL

Link to post
Share on other sites

> While discussing Greed, he intros a canned interview with "von Stroheim's cinematographer Karl."

 

> Karl who? Not Freund, he was still in Germany.

 

Clore,

 

I, too, found that a tad odd. I believe Cousins was referring to cinematographer Karl Brown (who is not credited with working on *Greed* on imdb).

 

The interview clip that Cousins used of "Karl" was from Kevin Browlow and David Gill's masterful documentary on silent films, *Hollywood* and the only cinematographer named Karl who is featured in that documentary (according to imdb) is Karl Brown.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well put, clore!

 

It appears, as I somewhat jokingly put it in my previous reply to Sepia, that Mr. Cousins' focus in this series has been and will continue be the whole idea of Hollywood "selling out", which probably isn't far off the truth in some regard, however what he apparently fails to recognize is that in many many MANY instances because of this, Hollywood films either my conscious effort or my sheer luck WOULD create "classic art" on more than a few occasions during the studio era.

 

(...I'm hoping my the time he gets to the Hollywood films of the 1940s, he'll admit that the Film Noir genre did anything BUT rely on the "happy" and "romanticized" ending to their movies...and is the reason I've going to stick around and watch of more of his film that he narrates in the FREAKIN' monotone voice o' his!!!!)

 

Edited by: Dargo2 on Sep 10, 2013 10:12 AM

Link to post
Share on other sites

*lzcutter said:*

*The interview clip that Cousins used of "Karl" was from Kevin Browlow and David Gill's masterful documentary on silent films, Hollywood and the only cinematographer named Karl who is featured in that documentary (according to imdb) is Karl Brown.*

 

Well, that clears that up, thanks.

 

I saw the Brownlow doc many years ago, must be at least half-a-lifetime ago for me and I hit 62 next month. Good recall there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

*Dargo2 said*

*(...I'm hoping my the time he gets to the Hollywood films of the 1940s, he'll admit that the Film Noir genre did anything BUT rely on the "happy" and "romanticized" ending to their movies...and is the reason I've going to stick around and watch of more of his film that he narrates in the FREAKIN' monotone voice o' his!!!!)*

 

Actually, he's going to assert that film noir was influenced by Rossellini's ROME, OPEN CITY, an observation which is rather betrayed by the calendar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

>Actually, he's going to assert that film noir was influenced by Rossellini's ROME, OPEN CITY, an observation which is rather betrayed by the calendar.

 

Yeah, exactly. Influenced by postwar Italian Neo-Realism and not by '30s German Expressionism? That would a major misstatement, alright.

 

(...you're kiddin', right?!) ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

*Dargo2 said:*

*Yeah, exactly. Influenced by postwar Italian Neo-Realism and not by '30s German Expressionism? That would a major misstatement, alright.*

 

*(...you're kiddin', right?!) ;)*

 

Unless it has been edited since its U.K. airing, this is exactly what it's going to say. I have a longtime correspondent over there, and two years ago when he first saw it, he wrote me about it. As this person is an industry professional who has worked on numerous WB DVD projects as a historian and producer of special features, and as a production assistant for feature films, I trust that he saw what he saw when he saw it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's another spoof of Cousins, this time it's Mark Cousins' tortoise interviewing "Guy Richtoy" on his career. Warning - the language is rough, just as one would expect from a real Guy Ritchie film:

 

 

"I'm right, aren't I?"

Link to post
Share on other sites

> I, too, found that a tad odd. I believe Cousins was referring to cinematographer Karl Brown (who is not credited with working on *Greed* on imdb).

 

I would have guessed Karl Struss, although he didn't work on *Greed* either.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> Yeah, exactly. Influenced by postwar Italian Neo-Realism and not by '30s German Expressionism? That would a major misstatement, alright.

 

Since noir is a French word, I'd think there was a French influence on the genre. ;-)

 

More seriously, I think of *Le jour se l?ve* (aka *Daybreak*, and remade by Hollywood as *The Long Night* several years later) was one of the earliest noirs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

True, about the French origins of the word, however it's been my understanding that many if not most film scholars attribute some of the earliest examples of Noir to the German Expressionists such a Fritz Lang and in particular his 1931 film "M".

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Noir" being a French word is as important in determining origins as certain food in the US being called French Fries to the typical Parisian's mystification.

 

I do see the Italian connection though.

 

We all know what noir is based on...Venetian blinds.

 

Venice is in Italy, and venetian blinds are visible in any good noir film, so discussion closed.

 

Yet if you are creating something of which you know not till it's done of what it is, which is the noir basis, then you can't really take credit for it.

 

Kind of like even a blind squirrel finds a nut sometimes, even if he were not searching for it.

 

The deference toward A-film standards which did not apply to outsiders like Edgar Ulmer, was what allowed him to attempt certain risky situations in film. But he can't really take credit for knowing he was starting a genre, he can only take credit for being a true original who knew how to film a scenario which packed a wallop.

 

That death by telephone cord scene is still a killer.

 

Of course, "SOTTF" could be in contention but we'll get there when we get there.

 

All I know is...only women can be true fans of film noir, as men who like noirs always turn out to be just like the wimps in the storyline who get taken by the femmes fatales...haha!

 

And I know this from experience. Don't ask...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...