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Bergman's "Winter Light"


CaveGirl
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Okay, so first I have to make it through "I Confess" as I plan to stay up to watch one of the few Bergman films I've not seen. And I start having this Proustian feeling every time the soaring music comes on during the Hitch film. I'm like...why is this bringing up scenes in my mind of some other film.

 

So I look up Dimitri Tiomkin's film scores in my trusty film library on the shelf and see he scored "It's a Wonderful Life" and then it all becomes clear to me. He's used some of the same motifs in "IC". Well, seems a bit cheesy to crib one's own stuff but okay.

 

So now "WL" is on and I'm enthralled as it is Bergman at his most depressing. Fab city! Spoilers alert...the priest actually manages to counsel a really down in the mouth parishioner [Max von Sydow] and the poor guy immediately goes off and shoots himself in the head. The the girlfriend gets told by her paramour that he is still in love with his dead wife and basically she is just annoying him and to back off as he's become a non-believer and that's that.

 

So...as usual I see why TCM has scheduled this at 4:00am. Those great pre-70's Janus Films are always on at this time.

 

But here's the sad part...I zonked at five minutes before the end. What happened? Did everyone kill themself or what?

 

And by the way...have you ever noticed how Woody Allen's films, just always look like a Bergman film but with a laugh track added?

 

Edited by: CaveGirl on Sep 12, 2013 2:35 PM

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You sure are a glutton. And this is one of the bleakest of his works. I watched it some time ago on YouTube, and--hey!--it's still there!:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SfEr9FfFAE

 

There are also a lot of other Bergman films (or were) available there for viewing, especially his earlier, less available films.

 

And, yes, the influence of Bergman on Woody Allen is clear, and became more evident as he moved away from comedy.

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"Winter Light" was the first Bergman film I ever saw, and my introduction to Max Von Sydow. I knew he made "The Greatest Story Ever Told" before I saw "Light"( 1969 was when I saw it), but I didn't see "Story" until years later.

 

I can't clearly recall the ending, because it's been WAY too long since I've seen it last, and not under the most lucid of conditions, but I THINK the priest just stays where he is without coming to much resolution.

 

Sepiatone

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