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A.I.: Artificial Intelligence


FlyBackTransformer
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I believe it's inaccurate to say Stanley Kubrick was at any point the director of this film or that it began production under his direction. My understanding is it's a project he long toyed with doing, and Spielberg probably borrowed some of his conceptual ideas (including the litany of words that cause the bonding imprint) after discussions with Kubrick. Spielberg may have even had access to Kubrick's notes but it's a Steven Spielberg film from start to finish. I believe Spielberg even wrote the screenplay, which is extremely rare for him (Close Encounters and Poltergeist being the only other two Spielberg screenplays, I think). Kubrick was either already dead or still working on Eyes Wide Shut when filming began on this one.

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sewhite2000 is correct that it's inaccurate to say that A.I. began production under Stanley Kubrick's direction. The film is based on a short story by Brian Aldiss, and Kubrick began the process of developing the story into a film in the 1970s. Over the years Kubrick hired a series of writers for the intended film, going into pre-production in 1994, but in 1995 he handed over director's postion to Steven Spielberg (who was brought on by Kubrick in the 1980s as one of the film's producers). Spielberg convinced Kubrick to remain director of the film, but work on the movie was put on hold because Kubrick was involved with EYES WIDE SHUT. After Kubrick death, Spielberg was approached by Kubrick's wife and others involved in the production to take over the position of director. In addition to directing, Spielberg also wrote the film's screenplay (based on the story treatment by Ian Watson, one of the writers that Kubrick hired).

Kubrick never referred to his intended film as A.I. Reportedly, he referred to it as "Pinocchio."

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Yeah, Pinnochio is the obvious inspiration. Watched a.i. again for the 2nd time last nite and did not care for it the second time around. Love between a mother and child can be timeless but this timeless? Story set in future where progressive political policies have turned America or whatever country this is supposed to be into a technological wonderland of wonderment. Guy brings home robotic boy to wife who is somewhat aghast but adjusts, brother puts robot up to getting lock of mothers hair at nite thus upsetting everyone then robot kid gobbles down spinach and soils his innerts then robot kid grabs another kid and drops into pool and stares up at confusion above then mother leaves robot kid in woods and David's odyssey begins. Gets picked up by balloon and ends up in destroy-a-robot carnival along with nice face-only big sister robot. Teddy winds up in trash bin. David befriends male prostitute robot and they visit Doctor Know to get lowdown on blue fairy then David appropriates heli-craft and along with his friend the male prostitute robot go zooming off to find Dr. Hobby. Later male prostitute robot gets picked up by the police? I guess. David chucks himself off building into water and finds the blue fairy in the form of a submerged 20th century amusement park relic. David stares at relic for the next 2000 years through an ice age until aroused by a friendly research team of ETs who eventually reconstitute his mother from a lock of hair stuck to Teddy...just for one day mind you. Gimme a break. Excessively profound or just too overblown? I say keep it nice and simple and pedestrian with something more enjoyable like *D.A.R.Y.L. "A man can understand this" -Anthony Quinn as Barabbas.* :)

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FlyBackTransformer, I actually enjoyed A.I. more when I saw it the second time. I do agree, however, that it was a stretch that Teddy still had the lock of Monica's hair over 2000 years after it was cut. One would've thought it would have been lost while fleeing in the woods or during the "adventures" at the Flesh Fair.

 

One thing that struck me during this viewing was how cruel Monica's real son Martin was. Then I realized (1) that his behavior was typical of most children, who are very often insenstive and hurtful to one another and (2) that David, despite his human appearance, was a machine (a Mecha to use the film's terminology) and everyone in the Swinton family was aware of this fact. Furthermore, the irreversibilty of his love bond for Monica perhaps makes David's affection "unnatural" (although there have been incidences of children rescued from abusive parents who ask to be returned to their abusers).

 

One note: the research team who discover David and Teddy in the last part of the movie were not extra-terrestials. They were the current generation of Mecha (robots). The idea here is that humans are now extinct and the mechanical beings are now creating themselves. David is important to their research because he is a Mecha who actually knew living humans.

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Two things struck me about that:

 

David, although a "robot" of sorts, was able to display more human emotion than even the "Mechas" of a 2,000 year advanced technology! And even in present day cloning experiments, the cloned specimens last much more than one day.

 

Sepiatone

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