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What ever happened..


Kid Dabb
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What if there were a series of, for lack of a better term, epilogues in film showing what has occurred beyond the end of a film. You know, the 'happily ever after' part. For instance, Dial M for Murder; a thirty to sixty minute epilogue dealing with the immediate and, possibly, long term future(s) of Margo, Mark, and (gulp!) Tony. Maybe even making some spooky connection to another film set after the period of the current subject. Sort of like segueing from Dial M for Murder into Rear Window following Grace Kelly's character. What transpired to get her from here to there?

 

This is what happens to me when I watch Rebecca.

Thoughts of an overactive mind..

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I like the idea very much.

 

It is sad to say that I believe it would be inappropriate for your example:

> Sort of like segueing from Dial M for Murder into Rear Window following Grace Kelly's character.

 

I would expect Margo in the future to be more jaded and be more quick to believe in a husband's evil nature than Lisa demonstrated.

 

I believe it would work better in reverse in that the after-movie failure of her relationship with Jefferies might make her plunge into a marriage with the first tennis pro to cross her path. I feel also that she appeared younger in nature and much less dowdy in appearance in: *Rear Window* than she did in: *Dial M for Murder* and that would reinforce the timeline.

 

I must wonder if a person could string together a life-line for John Wayne's roles as ships' captain.

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You're right about reversing the two films. I thought the same thing as I was hitting the Post Message button. Even though they were released the same year Rear Window , in real life, comes after Dial M for Murder, but that can be ignored in favor of your observations on Margo's and Lisa's character and appearance. I like that.

 

You've got an interesting thought with John Wayne there.

I'll see what I can dig up along those lines.

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Ha! You've fallen into the Hitchcock trap :)

 

If I were well off, I may only require a single key - to my residence. Now if I were up to some - thing, I might need other keys to compartmentalize and hide things. It may be rather sim - plistic, but as far as the film goes, each only needed to have one key.

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My last statement was purely hypothetical - if I were.. . I'm sure they weren't that well off, but they had no car we knew of. In fact, Tony calls Capt. Lesgate, feigning interest in a car the man is selling in order to set his scheme in motion. Now if they had a car, his offer to purchase Lesgate's might, if discovered, prove unusual and pique the interest of the inspector.

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Now you just know someone is going to film the sequel, right? I hope they make a good job of it, giving us no car crashes/chases, gunfights, or explosions.

 

I would actually welcome any car crash, gunfight and/or explosion that ended with Maxim de Winter in an oozing heap of bloody pulp.

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>finance said: Frankly, all this "latchkey" stuff kind of overwhelms DIAL M FOR MURDER, the same way that, for me, all the "letters in transit" stuff overwhelms CASABLANCA.

 

Definitely so with Dial M for Murder. This almost became a vaudeville routine. At least Casablanca didn't have the actual papers being shuffled here and there - all about - so's we'd be playing a shell game.

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He's a dirty murderer. It's clear in the book. He admits to it. His actions are sanitized in the movie. Even in the movie, he's an emotionally stunted boob who is ridiculously horrified by Rebecca's skeevy sexuality sullying up the purity of his hallowed halls. (And really, we only have his word that she was as nasty as he says she was. Everyone else adored her.)

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> finance wrote:

> Speaking of DIAL M FOR MURDER, isn't it unusual for all these people to be carrying around a "latchkey" loose, as a single key, tather than it being one key on a keychain? These people had no other keys?

 

The expense and difficulty of keeping an automobile in the city could not be justified when black cabs were plentiful or could be summoned quickly by telephone. Keys for liquor cabinets or closets often hung in the kitchen so that the man's absence would not prevent the wife from serving a guest or fetching items for delivery drivers to take to the man.

 

I believe having a ring of keys was a thing for servants and so gentlemen shunned them.

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Ah, there you see, I haven't read the book. I always took Maxim's side because I felt Rebecca was the baddie. Thank you for explaining that :) Upon my next viewing, I will make a point of viewing it from that perspective.

 

>selimsa said: (And really, we only have his word that she was as nasty as he says she was. Everyone else adored her.)

 

I can go along with that, but there are people who put up such a front. They are bright and shiny on the outside; incurably vicious and afraid on the inside. Perhaps Rebecca was of such character. Perhaps not. This is very interesting ;)

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>Frankly, all this "latchkey" stuff kind of overwhelms DIAL M FOR MURDER, the same way that, for me,

 

I agree. :) Only one time in the many years I've seen this film over and over again, did I completely follow the latchkey routine, so that I knew which key was which. But now I can't follow it. The movie should have been titled THE LATCHKEY MURDER.

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Ah, there you see, I haven't read the book. I always took Maxim's side because I felt Rebecca was the baddie. Thank you for explaining that :) Upon my next viewing, I will make a point of viewing it from that perspective.

 

The really awful thing about the book is that it figures you will still side with Maxim because, as you say, Rebecca was a baddie. But that doesn't matter. She could be as sexually revolting as she wanted, fling her uncouth behavior in his face over and over and it still doesn't justify him murdering her and then sinking her body at the bottom of the ocean. He could have divorced her but she knew his warped sense of heraldic pride wouldn't allow him to court that kind of shame. Much more noble to just murder the scarlet woman.

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