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A Tribute To Slimy Dan


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I like Dan's final scene , when Liz comes to his place with the loot, acting like she's there to share it, but  she only wants to know where the money came from, and then finish Dan off.  Dan reveals himself to be just a poor shmuck  who stumbled onto an opportunity to extort some money from a big business man. Clearly "Danny" (hey, Dan gets his own name for this character) was a little boy trying to play a big boys game and gets in over his head.  When things don't go right and Liz gets involved, Danny is no match to handle the situation.  He's running scared the whole time, he's doomed and he knows it.

Trivia question---Name some other films in which characters had the actors' same first names. One is Frank Sinatra as "Frankie Machine" in THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM.

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After the big restoration buildup by Eddie Muller, the film began, and there was a glitch in the first minute. No more after that, though. Excellent noir.

I didn't notice any glitch. I did see a scratch on the print, if that's what you're referring to.

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One other nice little feature to note about Too Late For Tears:  With the brief close-up of Liz Scott lying dead outside her hotel after she'd fallen off the balcony, it joins The Killing and Armored Car Robbery to complete a holy trio of noir endings where the loot is scattered to the winds, even if in this case the visual effect wasn't quite as dramatic. 

 

In fact, since Too Late For Tears was released prior to both of those other movies, I almost wonder whether those other two filmmakers didn't borrow the idea and take it up to a higher level, first in Armored Car Robbery and then even more dramatically in The Killing.  In any case, it was a nice little touch.

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I like Dan's final scene , when Liz comes to his place with the loot, acting like she's there to share it, but  she only wants to know where the money came from, and then finish Dan off.  Dan reveals himself to be just a poor shmuck  who stumbled onto an opportunity to extort some money from a big business man. Clearly "Danny" (hey, Dan gets his own name for this character) was a little boy trying to play a big boys game and gets in over his head.  When things don't go right and Liz gets involved, Danny is no match to handle the situation.  He's running scared the whole time, he's doomed and he knows it.

 

Yes,  Dan was in over his head.  While he had the guts to slap a women around that was about it.    Jane (Scott), was clearly the tiger of the film.    Her greed made her stronger as the story moved forward while Dan got weaker.    At the start it was Scott thinking she shouldn't have gotten mixed up with this man,  and by the end it was Dan who felt this way.     Very nice twist.

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One other nice little feature to note about Too Late For Tears:  With the brief close-up of Liz Scott lying dead outside her hotel after she'd fallen off the balcony, it joins The Killing and Armored Car Robbery to complete a holy trio of noir endings where the loot is scattered to the winds, even if in this case the visual effect wasn't quite as dramatic. 

 

In fact, since Too Late For Tears was released prior to both of those other movies, I almost wonder whether those other two filmmakers didn't borrow the idea and take it up to a higher level, first in Armored Car Robbery and then even more dramatically in The Killing.  In any case, it was a nice little touch.

Two other films with  the "loot scattered  to the winds"  are TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE and ITS A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD  (I know I am stretching the concept here) :)  There must be some other scenes of a similar nature, any thoughts?

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Two other films with  the "loot scattered  to the winds"  are TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE and ITS A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD  (I know I am stretching the concept here) :)  There must be some other scenes of a similar nature, any thoughts?

 

Treasure of the Sierra Madre, of course. Haven't seen the other movie.

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In TOO LATE FOR TEARS Dan refers to Liz as "tiger" on several occasions.  Something is in my mind that Dan uses that "tiger" nickname  for a gal in some other film, at the moment I can't quite place it.

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In TOO LATE FOR TEARS Dan refers to Liz as "tiger" on several occasions.  Something is in my mind that Dan uses that "tiger" nickname  for a gal in some other film, at the moment I can't quite place it.

Well, Joan Bennett's name in Scarlet Street is Kitty. Still feline but not quite the same thing as "Tiger'", though, is it?

 

Ironic, isn't it, that Duryea keeps calling Liz Scott tiger, not realizing just how appropriate that nickname will eventually turn out to be. Poor Dan, a small timer in the film who encountered a cold hearted greedy animal of the big city jungle in eye pleasing form that would turn out to be his doom.

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duryea.png

Dan on the way down. 

 

This film is also known as Killer Bait, I just found out.

Nice pix of our Danny Boy, cinemafan. I didn't know about the Killer Bait re-titling of Too Late for Tears which, according to IMBd, occured with the film's 1955 re-release as part of a double bill with Johnny Holiday.

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73599583-0e94-43b8-a874-6597b903e976_zps

 

What if . . . Dan Duryea as Rick in Casablanca.

 

They were able to alter Bogart's screen image and sell him as a wounded anti-hero sexy guy in this film. I think that the Duryea of the late '40s could have been very interesting in the same role, or, at least, one similar to it.

 

They were having too good a time then stereotyping him in supporting roles as a slimy woman slapping heel, though. Dan never got the chance. But he had the same kind of lived in face as a Bogart, and you knew he could play it tough. The question is - could he be viewed by female members of the audience as a romantic? Right production and script, I suspect it might have worked.

 

Pure speculation, of course. But he sure does look good in that Rick-type tux, doesn't he?

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73599583-0e94-43b8-a874-6597b903e976_zps

 

What if . . . Dan Duryea as Rick in Casablanca.

 

They were able to alter Bogart's screen image and sell him as a wounded anti-hero sexy guy in this film. I think that the Duryea of the late '40s could have been very interesting in the same role, or, at least, one similar to it.

 

They were having too good a time then stereotyping him in supporting roles as a slimy woman slapping heel, though. Dan never got the chance. But he had the same kind of lived in face as a Bogart, and you knew he could play it tough. The question is - could he be viewed by female members of the audience as a romantic? Right production and script, I suspect it might have worked.

 

Pure speculation, of course. But he sure does look good in that Rick-type suit, doesn't he?

 

Well Bacall didn't even want to go see Casablanca when she heard Bogart was the lead because she didn't feel he was a romantic lead.  Her mother dragged her to the film and she still wasn't very impressed by him.     I guess he hadn't learn to whistle yet.

 

As for Dan;  I believe that shot is from the film World For Ransom.    This is a movie where Dan plays the hero  (One could say any film where Dan doesn't die is a film where he is a hero!).    Good noir film and one I wish TCM would show since I haven't seen it in years.

 

Dan as Rick?   I can see it and Dan could have pulled it off.   

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I'm not sure that Duryea had the voice of a standard leading man.  It suited him for supporting and villainous roles for sure.

Have you seen him as the lead as a world weary thief in The Burglar, Bogie? And in that film he's, wait for it, a guy of honour ready to perform an act of self sacrifice. Sound familiar? It's a little production that few have heard of, no Casablanca, of course. But Dan's damn good in it, in my opinion.

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Well Bacall didn't even want to go see Casablanca when she heard Bogart was the lead because she didn't feel he was a romantic lead.  Her mother dragged her to the film and she still wasn't very impressed by him.     I guess he hadn't learn to whistle yet.

 

As for Dan;  I believe that shot is from the film World For Ransom.    This is a movie where Dan plays the hero  (One could say any film where Dan doesn't die is a film where he is a hero!).    Good noir film and one I wish TCM would show since I haven't seen it in years.

 

Dan as Rick?   I can see it and Dan could have pulled it off.   

Actually that shot of Dan is from Criss Cross, a villainous role (of course) but one in which Duryea was smooth and under stated. Dan was born to play a cynic.

 

Thanks for telling me about World for Ransom, James. I'll have to keep an eye open for that one.

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Actually that shot of Dan is from Criss Cross, a villainous role (of course) but one in which Duryea was smooth and under stated. Dan was born to play a cynic.

 

Yes,  Criss Cross is another film where Dan wears a white suit.    I hope every Duryea fan has a chance to see World for Ransom;  it is a noir film where Dan has a role similar to the type of noir role Bogie was typically featured in and different than any of Dan's other noir roles. 

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Have you seen him as the lead as a world weary thief in The Burglar, Bogie? And in that film he's, wait for it, a guy of honour ready to perform an act of self sacrifice. Sound familiar? It's a little production that few have heard of, no Casablanca, of course. But Dan's damn good in it, in my opinion.

No I haven't seen The Burglar (1957).  It wasn't even on my radar, so thanks.

But according to my little film diary I have seen the remake and in the theatre too.  The Burglars (1971) by Henri Verneuil starring Jean-Paul Belmondo, Dyan Cannon AND ... Omar Shariff!

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No I haven't seen The Burglar (1957).  It wasn't even on my radar, so thanks.

But according to my little film diary I have seen the remake and in the theatre too.  The Burglars (1971) by Henri Verneuil starring Jean-Paul Belmondo, Dyan Cannon AND ... Omar Shariff!

 

Does the 1971 version focus on the relationship between the lead burglar and the girl,  who in the original is like his younger sister OR do Belmondo and Cannon have a sexual relationship?       I only ask because what makes the 1957 version more than just a crime capper is the uniqueness of the bro-sis type relationship and the loyalty the leader had towards the girls farther as it relates to taking care of the gal.

 

  (and with Mansfield playing the gal,  'sis' had a lot of sexual vibes Dan had to ignore!). 

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Does the 1971 version focus on the relationship between the lead burglar and the girl,  who in the original is like his younger sister OR do Belmondo and Cannon have a sexual relationship?       I only ask because what makes the 1957 version more than just a crime capper is the uniqueness of the bro-sis type relationship and the loyalty the leader had towards the girls farther as it relates to taking care of the gal.

 

  (and with Mansfield playing the gal,  'sis' had a lot of sexual vibes Dan had to ignore!). 

Sorry, James I saw The Burglars in August 1972 on a double bill with the Warren Beatty, Goldie Hawn movie, Dollars and have no recollection of it at all.   

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Well, I did it.  I just read this whole thread.  Very enjoyable.  Thanks to all who contributed. I love to read, and this was good reading.

 

I don't know why I didn't check it out before - life was busier, and there was lots of distractions here.  I appreciate the heads up for any upcoming films.

 

I will repeat the link to the Dan site for those who have not seen it.  Great photos in it.  I was sad to learn that Dan died early, only 61 years of age.

 

http://www.sarahbethonline.com/danduryea/index.html

 

I love Dan as Pastrami in Ball of Fire.  Humor - he could do.

Pastrami-Dan-Duryea-BallofFire.jpg

 

when he's getting set up to take the hit

Ball+of+Fire+11%252C+Prof+Oddly+stops+on

 

balloffire5.jpg

 

PictureTopplesDuryea-BallofFire.jpg

 

and this one when they are tickling him to get information

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this photo caught my eye - reminded me how many of his films I have not seen

bfi-00n-qqe.jpg?itok=QQOo6Jw_

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Well, I did it.  I just read this whole thread.  Very enjoyable.  Thanks to all who contributed. I love to read, and this was good reading.

 

I don't know why I didn't check it out before - life was busier, and there was lots of distractions here.  I appreciate the heads up for any upcoming films.

 

I will repeat the link to the Dan site for those who have not seen it.  Great photos in it.  I was sad to learn that Dan died early, only 61 years of age.

 

http://www.sarahbethonline.com/danduryea/index.html

 

this photo caught my eye - reminded me how many of his films I have not seen

bfi-00n-qqe.jpg?itok=QQOo6Jw_

Glad you enjoyed the thread, cinemafan. Also thanks for the reminder to all about Sarah Beth's Dan Duryea Central. a terrific website devoted to our slimy favourite here. http://www.sarahbethonline.com/danduryea/index.html

 

That last photo that you included of Duryea with Jane Russell and Jeff Chandler reminds me that I, too, have yet another Duryea effort to see, 1955's Foxfire. Dangerous Dan's lookin' a little too domestic for my liking in that shot. On the other hand, Jane looks like she might have just gotten some of the Duryea treatment.

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Glad you enjoyed the thread, cinemafan. Also thanks for the reminder to all about Sarah Beth's Dan Duryea Central. a terrific website devoted to our slimy favourite

 

That last photo that you included of Duryea with Jane Russell and Jeff Chandler reminds me that I, too, have yet another Duryea effort to see, 1955's Foxfire. Dangerous Dan's lookin' a little too domestic for my liking in that shot. On the other hand, Jane looks like she might have just gotten some of the Duryea treatment.

 

That picture is perfect for parody;    e.g.  Jane is saying;    OMG,  the color and pattern on that apron just doesn't work with your skin tones.    Hey, Jeff what do you think?

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That picture is perfect for parody;    e.g.  Jane is saying;    OMG,  the color and pattern on that apron just doesn't work with your skin tones.    Hey, Jeff what do you think?

NOBODY talks to Dan Duryea like that. No wonder Jane looks like she just got slapped!

 

(And I say that as someone who is normally madly in love with Jane, too!)

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