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With Six You Get Eggrolls.... funny!


FredCDobbs
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I normally don't like these kinds of large-family mixed-family movies, but this one is pretty good. Very interesting and embarrassing situations in it that seem realistic. And trying to sneak around all those kids to be alone is quite funny. :)

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Doris Day was down right charming and funny in these movies and Brian Keith was a good male lead for her. But these films really went out of style in a hurry in the later sixties. This film had been on TCM recently and was discussed briefly on the boards . George Carlin makes his film debut here, of course his claim to fame isn't his film career. Both Jamie Farr and William Christopher of MASH fame are in this film. Also the stunning Elaine Devry is present and I never knew (until a few minutes ago) that she was married to Mickey Rooney. Of course who wasn't married to Mickey at one time or another?

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>Also the stunning Elaine Devry is present and I never knew (until a few minutes ago) that she was married to Mickey Rooney. Of course who wasn't married to Mickey at one time or another?

 

I believe Art Carney was able to avoid falling under Mickey's spell.

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Despite Ben's comment that the film was not very successful, the reality is the film was extremely successful when released in August of 1968. In fact it is one of the top ten moneymaking films of Doris Day's 39 picture career. I rechecked the copies of Variety and Box-Office Magazine from August - October, 1968 and the film was extremely popular grossing in excess of 10 million in the US, which, at the time, was very good and the overall reviews from critics, except in some of the so-called sophisticated film markets, were very good including Boston Globe, Washington Post and L.A. Times as well as Saturday Review. The film grossed double the combined box-office take of Miss Day's 2 1967 films, "Caprice" and "The Ballad of Josie".

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George Carlin, over the years, has been shown to be quite good in his scant few movie appearances. He might have been very successful in a film comedy career, but he mentioned in an interview that when making this movie, the way Hollywood worked at the time, the experience was a bad one for him. I didn't see the movie until after Carlin's fame as a comic was well established, and felt he wasn't a good fit. Perhaps, if like he alluded, he was allowed to have input to his character's lines, it would have been a better role, who knows?

 

But with that aside, I didn't think the movie was all that bad. Not GREAT, mind you, but still a pleasant time.

 

Sepiatone

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I have always liked Brian Keith in any performance and here I believe he's perfect and a very good match with Doris Day. The two of them behaving like teenagers before they married was refreshing, compared to other films like Please Don't Eat the Daisies and Yours, Mine and Ours where adult parenthood is exemplified. Doris Day usually shows her femininity well and I find it very attractive. I could listen to her talk all day.

 

George Carlin.. in this film I felt his presence was forced, as if it was mandatory to have him in the film. His role was ok but I felt he may have improvised an additional line or two - it felt awkward.

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I think Ben Mankiewicz was comparing the box office success of WITH SIX YOU GET EGGROLL to that of YOURS, MINE AND OURS, which was released the same year.

 

WITH SIX YOU GET EGGROLL grossed $10,095,200 while YOURS, MINE AND OURS grossed $25,912,624 (more than double that of WITH SIX YOU GET EGGROLL).

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Had I gone to see either at the theater, I would have gone to see Yours, Mine and Ours because of Lucille Ball and Henry Fonda. I am more appreciative of Lucy's non-comedic roles and this was light enough on the comedy so as not to deter me - and it had a great ending (which I knew nothing about until I watched it).

 

I liked the play between Doris and Brian much better, though.

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There is a refreshing maturity in her performance. She's playing someone close to her own age and the gauze/soft focus is not used on the camera lens, a fact noted in the film's very upbeat review in Variety in 1968. She doesn't resort to "cute" and she and Brian Keith have a very believable chemistry. In addition, the supporting cast is great from Pat to Alice to Barbara, et al.

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I don't think she knew that at the time. She was actually scheduled to do a second film for the CBS Film Division written by Sol Saks and entitled, "The Panda Affair" and there were, of course, dozens of offers later on.

 

In the 1980's she told several people that she had loved the film because she enjoyed the character she played and liked the fact that she wasn't obsessed with her clothes, but dressed in a real way.

 

I think playing someone close to her age freed her in some ways. There are several scenes where, once upon a time, Doris Day might have not allowed herself to be as natural on camera.

 

When she's re-setting her wig, which the dog has destroyed, her own hair is limp and listless and she says to her sister, played by Pat Carroll, "Looks at this......" as she lifts and drops her hair.

 

Later on, after the party has ended, she undoes the belt on her red dress and "lets herself go" as any normal woman might have done. No concern for how she might appear on camera.

 

It's not a great film but the actors bring genuine conviction to it and there are some good laughs.

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I believe she noted that in her 1975 autobiography written with A.E. Hotchner. She noted it to me in a letter dated April 8, 1980 in response to my mentioning I had seen the film again on television.

 

"I really enjoyed making "Eggroll". It was a happy set and I think the end result was certainly one of my best comedies of the 1960's."

 

More recently she has referenced that again, long after there was any chance of her returning to the screen.

 

When I first met her as a 19 year old in 1973, I excitedly told her, "You know I've seen "With Six You Get Eggroll" 54 times!" (as though I had discovered a cure for cancer.

 

Her response, "and you don't have diabetes?"

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"Lover Come Back" is certainly better written as is "Teacher's Pet" in fact "Lover" has a better script than "Pillow Talk". "Eggroll's" strength for want of a better word, is Doris not playing a character a decade younger than her age and that probably influenced her feelings about the film.

 

She loved the three films with Rock and "The Thrill of it All" with James Garner. She never hesitated in listing them as favorites.

 

I think, also, with "Eggroll" - coming as it did after things like "Do Not Disturb", "Caprice" and "The Ballad of Josie" in particular, it was something she could believe in.

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