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ACTORS & ACTRESSES ALIVE DURING TV ERA WHO AVOIDED IT.


cody1949
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>Did Brando do any tv besides those Larry King interviews?

 

He supposedly did an episode of The Actors Studio show in the late '40s, but it is lost.

 

He was also in Roots 2 as neo-Nazi George Lincoln Rockwell

 

He was on Murrow's Person to Person. He did an interview with Dick Cavett ('73) and at least one with fellow Nebraskan Johnny Carson in '68 -- a clip was shown in Schickel's documentary.

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>If you mean absolutely zero appearances, that's tough. The only other I can think of is Cary Grant

 

Was introduced in the Ed Sullivan audience at least once, and also appeared on the Hitchcock AFI tribute

 

>Rita Hayworth

 

Guest starred on Laugh In and The Carol Burnett Show

 

>Marilyn Monroe

 

Guest starred on Jack Benny

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No, there was no need to perform; just an appearance. Like a mystery guest on What's My Line would be fine. Cary Grant was tributed on the Kennedy Center Honors in the early '80's. Come to think of it, perhaps Tyrone Power appeared on What's My Line.

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Note to everyone:

 

In the IMDB listings for individual actors, right under the section called FILMOGRAPHY, look for ACTOR and SELF.

 

Many famous actors appeard on TV shows as themselves, so that appearance will usually be listed in the SELF section.

 

For example, Judy Garland has many TV listings in the SELF category.

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>Me:

>If you mean absolutely zero appearances, that's tough. The only other I can think of is Cary Grant

>RKimble

>Was introduced in the Ed Sullivan audience at least once

 

If the Oscars don't count, I don't think being an audience member anywhere can count. How did he appear in the AFI tribute? In film clips, as an attendee, or as a speaker?

 

At least I still have Marlene. Or do I?

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Quite possibly, some of them avoided TV in the early days as a dictate from the studio heads. Others because by that time they either retired, or their fame waned to the point that even television wasn't interested. Many others were smarter than that. Television was EXPOSURE. The best way to keep oneself on the public's mind was exposure. In any form. Those who hadn't died before wising up were probably too washed up to take advantage.

 

If simply being SEEN on television counts, then Grant is disqualified from the avoidance list. He sat at Hitchcock's elbow during a televised tribute to Hitch's career.

 

Sepiatone

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The variation you mention is the only one I find interesting. I would add that the actor has to play a character. I.e. they cannot play themselves.

 

To me this variation is of interest because it relates to a change in the career of an actor. Note that there was just an announcement that Meg Ryan will star in a TV show next season. The announcement clearly implies her lead movie days are behind her at age 50.

 

Being on a talk show or game show is often done to promote a movie and therefore doesn't signal a career change, per se.

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Marlene did a TV concert in the early 70's. I know it aired in Great Britain, but can't remember if it aired in the US. There was at least one other concert film made in the 60's, in Australia, maybe?

 

Here's a clip from the 1970's one (I think):

 

 

 

However, if you're talking about acting (in a role other than "Dietrich" ;) ) on TV, then no, I don;t believe she did.

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>*If simply being SEEN on television counts, then Grant is disqualified from the avoidance list. He sat at Hitchcock's elbow during a televised tribute to Hitch's career.*

 

 

 

I remember waking up to the news that Grant had died. Coincidentally, about twelve hours later, he could be seen in a TV special titled "All-Star Party For Clint Eastwood" in which he was shown making some remarks about the honoree. CBS preceded the program with a voice-over noting that it had been taped at an earlier date and expressed condolences to the Grant family.

 

In the early 50s, Cary Grant also appeared unannounced on a program titled "Dave and Charley" that was hosted by the team of Cliff Arquette (aka Charley Weaver) and Dave Willock - he did this simply because he found the pair amusing.

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