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Joan Crawford as SOTM January 2014

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I love "Humoresque" Crawford and Garfield make a real hot couple- their doomed romance is classic Hollywood.

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Well related to our comments about Henry Fonda as a jazz bass player in The Wrong Man, at least Garfield showed some passion.

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On January 16th, I neglected to mention that yes, when THEY ALL KISSED THE BRIDE re-aired, it did contain that politically correct bit of editing. As I have stated before, I consider this a modern-day version of censorship and I don't agree with it.

 

I think most Japanese Americans today have enough intelligence and understanding (and forgiveness) to figure out why Joan utters the derogatory **** line in the film. Also, that if we put it into historical context, we should be able to live with it, without someone performing a cinematic vasectomy on that piece of film.

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I was 14 years old when I first saw *Trog* (1970), which is airing at 2:15AM tonight. At the time I saw it, I recall thinking that it must have been one of the worst movies ever made. I haven't seen it since 1970, so I'm looking forward to watching it tonight just to see if I still agree with my original assessment of the film.

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>I was 14 years old when I first saw Trog (1970), which is airing at 2:15AM tonight. At the time I saw it, I recall thinking that it must have been one of the worst movies ever made. I haven't seen it since 1970, so I'm looking forward to watching it tonight just to see if I still agree with my original assessment of the film.

 

I am looking forward to it airing tonight as well. It was a different era in moviemaking, and product had changed a great deal-- but Hollywood companies were still hiring her to sell the product.

 

I read that she was sought after for a role in AIRPORT '77, a few years after TROG, but turned it down. So this did not necessarily have to be her final feature. She was still getting offers.

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I may just be a sucker for 1950's corporate dramas, but I loved The Best of Everything, which I'd never seen before until tonight.

 

Okay, the final scene was a bit too obvious, but in this case there was credibility to the cliche, along with a nice mix of younger stars like Hope Lange and Diane Baker to complement the old warriors Crawford and Brian Aherne. I'm sure it's been said many times, but there was a lot of Mad Men in this movie, only the movie was a lot less self-conscious.

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I was 11years old when I saw The Best of Everything in the theatre when it came out in 1959. I admit as a child I was a bit bored by the all the romance but for some reason I took notice when Joan came on the screen. I have forgotten a lot of the picture but I remember every scene Joan was in particularly the scene she speaks angrily on the phone, I been a Joan Crawford fan ever since and have seen most of her pictures some more than once.

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>I finally got to watch Sudden Fear last night. I'm not a big Crawford fan but this film was terrific. Even though the theme is a familiar one, there were some nice touches to keep you in suspense. I liked Myra's skillful way of handling her problem, though her plan eventually unraveled... I liked the scene of Joan in the closet peering out, and you could see the beads of sweat on her forehead and the look of terror in her eyes. Well done.

 

I agree. I wasn?t expecting much from Sudden Fear. Really surprised. It?s a neat bit of realism to realize that as a playwright she would have been able to come up with a plan like that, a plan that nevertheless would probably not have worked in real life, she had it right down to the minute. After that pivotal scene, the ?sudden fear? scene if you will, I had thought that she would be skulking around in abject fear for the rest of the movie and we would all be on pins and needles waiting for the ax to fall. But she had other ideas. Joan had some nice closeups, including the one you mention, she was really good throughout. A nice piece of irony at the start. She fires this guy from her play because she doesn?t think he?s romantic enough, then he turns around and woos her and wins her in real life.

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Just called to say how wonderful it is that TCM devoted January programming to all these great films.

 

70smyway0888.jpg

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I just can't imagine any guy finding this film engrossing. About five times I have tried to get through it, but the sandman has always grabbed me. The title song is the best thing about it.

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LOL. The Best of Everything? I hadnt seen it in years. I missed the beginning 10 mins. this time around. I have a soft spot for 50s soap operas,so I still enjoyed it. Too bad Joan didnt have a bigger part (I heard it WAS bigger, but her scenes were cut)......enjoyed lecherous Brian Aherne. Bob Evans was wise to switch careers.....Wonder how different the novel was?

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*Della* - Last thing I semi-watched before going to sleep last night (semi-, because it's the kind of thing one can read a book to or do other work around the house without missing anything major).

 

As soon as it came on I thought it looked like a TV movie, and I knew that must be the case the way the music swelled and scenes faded to black at natural commerical breaks. Looking it up just now I see in fact it was the pilot for a series that wasn't picked up.

 

What I'm not finding on the Internet is why in the world the daughter character would be killed off at the end of the pilot...??

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Hi NewYorkGuy,

 

I think it was meant to be an anthology program, starring Paul Burke and Charles Bickford. Crawford was the special guest star, so she and her and her daughter (characters) in the pilot would not have been in the rest of the series. It was not picked up by the network, obviously, and Bickford went on to do The Virginian. Later, someone who had the rights to this unsold pilot decided to sell it as a (tele)film, capitalizing on Crawford's participation in it. It's only 68 minutes long and was probably meant to fill a 90 minute time slot on television, padded with commercials.

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Ah -- that makes sense. Problem of the Week series for Bickford and Burke, not the Problems of the Rich Lady's Family on the Hill.

 

Thanks for that.

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I just can't imagine any guy finding [The Best of Everything] engrossing. About five times I have tried to get through it, but the sandman has always grabbed me. The title song is the best thing about it.

 

Well, you might also say it's hard to imagine any real guy liking Johnny Mathis, which makes about as much sense as your first comment. Or for that matter, liking Fred Astaire or Bing Crosby movies. But why should appreciation for movies have to fall along gender lines? Hell, I've even known women who like John Wayne movies.

 

I don't think TBOE was the world's greatest movie, but if you like films that get behind the scenes of working life in the 50's and depict how people related to each other in the workplaces of that era, it's more than worth a watch, in this case for the Crawford character alone. Of course there was soap to spare, but you could say the same thing about virtually every movie with a man and a woman in it during the Code era that showed them falling into each other's arms and deciding to get married in the final 30 seconds before the closing credits. This is just the way that Hollywood was back in the day, and if that sort of thing puts you off, you're best sticking to movies where the hero just marries his horse. :)

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>Ah -- that makes sense. Problem of the Week series for Bickford and Burke, not the Problems of the Rich Lady's Family on the Hill.

 

And my guess is that the proposed series probably had a different name, and the episode title was 'Della,' after Joan Crawford's character.

 

Maybe they would have sold it if it had been a series for her...but at this point, she was based on the east coast and probably was not interested in doing a weekly show in California.

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Bad analogy. I do like Mathis. These are just songs. There is no plot or characters involved. I can't think of any film that is more of a women's film than THE BEST OF EVERYTHING. It is especially a culture shock in the middle of Super Bowl week, during which I'm feeling more macho than usual..

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I had read too that if the series was picked up it was possible the Della character would be seen again. Not a series regular per se but they would revisit her character again. I actually enjoyed this little slice of 1964 technicolor Joan Crawford. Interesting pit stop on the way to the end of her career in 1972 ( finished out on TV ).

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I agree that DELLA was an interesting production for her. She is absolutely glamorous in it. While they do use excessive soft-focus camera work for her close-ups, it's not as bad as Lucille Ball in MAME. Crawford really maintained her figure as she aged, and I thought the gray-streaked hairstyle she chose for this role looked perfect.

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I posted this review about TROG on the thread for that film, but thought I would repost it here, too:

 

I liked TROG (and my standards are high). I think for what it is, or what it attempts to do, it does it very well-- which is to present simple yet thoughtful entertainment. Crawford lends credibility to the entire affair. In the hands of a lesser actress, it could have been utterly dreadful. What I liked most about it is that there are horror elements, but that the caveman isn't made to be too much of a monster-- he has a gentler, less primitive side that Crawford's character is able to appeal to and reach. Of course, everything goes off-kilter and he runs amok until right before the final fadeout, when she is able to talk him down and hand over the child he had kidnapped.

 

But TROG is not as bad a film as it's been made out to be-- and in many places, I have seen it receive two out of four stars. CALLING PHILO VANCE, which also aired recently on TCM, usually gets one star. Final analysis: glad I took the time to watch it. If anything, it gave me a deeper appreciation of Joan Crawford as an actress, doing the best she could, given the material and the circumstances.

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I think she looked absolutely lovely in Della. The hair and makeup suited her. Yes the soft focus was obvious but not obtrusive. She still had a lovely figure and her legs ... wow, she still had it.

 

I have seen bits and pieces of Trog over the past few years but not much of it. I dvr'd it last night and I am looking forward to sitting down tonight and watching it. I will report back after I have seen it in its entirety. I saw the first 15 minutes last night and my overall impression: yep I wanna see more and see where this goes. It may ultimately go no where pleasant but I'm still intrigued.

 

What I have noticed about Crawford in even her lesser films, you can not take your eyes off of her. She is always the center of attention, whether this was intended or not. Even in "The Best of Everything". I was more interested in her characters journey than any of the "youngsters" :) I believe there was to have been a series of "The Best of Everything" but it never saw the light of day. How interesting to have seen where that might have taken Crawford.

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Joan would have loved being so honored by TCM this month. In fact if she were still alive she'd make sure to appear right next to Ben or Robert adding her own two cents in during each film's introduction. Yes, Crawford did call in from Heaven as the posted picture shows and she was quite happy and approves.

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