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Where did the classic movies go?


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Given the many definitions of the word, "classic" I've listed above ( or below, depending on your site set up), there are many movies from recent eras that fit. At least when you consider definitions 1 C, from the adjective descriptions, and definitions 2 and 5 from the noun. These could easily describe many movies from the '70's, '80's AND '90's.

 

Sepiatone

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>I have Always associated Classic Movies as being from the 30's & 40's.

 

But from the beginning, TCM associated it to mean films from the 1920s to the 1980s (it expanded to the 1990s when TCM hit its first decade).

 

I get that many people associate the channel with movies from the 1930s and 1940s and prefer those films over all others.

 

But, TCM has always been about silents, studio era films and post-1960 films. It was that way when the channel debuted in 1994 and it still is today.

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Well, unfortunately for you and several other posters here who like to think and believe that a movie channel that has as part of it's name the word "classic" that this is the reason why only certain decades of films should be shown on the channel. And that any films made after a certain year should not be shown because to you and others like you the more recent films were not made before a certain date.

 

As has been explained by Andy and Lynn and several others, the word classic should not be applied to or represent a year or time period. Many films made after an arbitrary point in time can and have been classified as classic. Just because a film was made after, oh, lets say 1970 is not reason enough to exclude it from being shown on TCM.

 

When TCM started in 1994, they were already showing some films from the 1980's. This practice has continued to the present day. TCM's mission statement has always indicated that recent films (within) ten years or so cold be shown on the channel.

 

But make no mistake, as others have written, the stated goal of TCM has always been to show the best films from many time periods, but specifically films from the so-called golden age of Hollywood. But this does not mean that TCM will nor or does not show more current films.

 

A film like The Conversation made in 1974 can and should be shown. Just like in January I believe 1993's The Remains of the Day will be shown. Remains will be 21 years old by January. Not as old obviously as 1942's Casablanca, but that really is not the point.

 

I would love to be able to see on TCM many of the past twenty years worth of Academy Award nominated films be allowed to be shown on TCM. As Robert Osbourne is the "unofficial' record keeper/biographer of the Oscars, I am sure he would love the chance to speak about these recent films.

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> I would love to be able to see on TCM many of the past twenty years worth of Academy Award nominated films be allowed to be shown on TCM. As Robert Osbourne is the "unofficial' record keeper/biographer of the Oscars, I am sure he would love the chance to speak about these recent films.

 

Rey,

 

TCM has partnered with the Academy and is doing a documentary on the history of the Academy Awards. It should air in late January or in February.

 

Both the Academy and TCM seem very excited about the project. The Academy is opening its vault and is said to be sharing its wealth of images and broadcasts (both radio and televisions) with the producers of the documentary.

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In any business its important to keep bringing in new customers. And to bring in younger viewers is a logical thing to do. But, to play newer movies is totally the wrong way to do it. That just makes this just another movie channel. And the potential is so much more than that.

 

And I don't think a quote from 10 years ago accurately reflects TCM's thoughts today. That was before the cruise and the film festival. 10 years ago they probably thought those weren't possible but, here they are. TCM should easily be able to see the number of young people attending the film festival. And there are other classic film showing all over my town that all ages attend.

 

And also how do you explain the advent of MEtv, Ion and other tv channels coming along showing old shows.TVLand with original programming emulating more classic sitcoms. There are lots of "new" classic fare all over the tube. And TCM should be the king of all of that.

 

To me classic refers less to the age of the film and more towards the quality of the film. A movie doesn't have to be made in the classic era to have the sensibility of a classic film. I think TCM should always strive to be unique and better than the other channels. I don't have a problem with a newer movies its its at the level a TCM film.

 

Frankly, I don't care much for the cheap friday night stuff. If there is a complaint from me, that would be it. Those aren't classic at any level. Much better movies could fill that spot.

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>I agree. I have Always associated Classic Movies as being from the 30's & 40's.

 

I agree.

 

Some people want more modern movies shown on TCM because TCM is the cheapest non-commercial movie channel and they don't want to have to pay for these more modern-movie channels:

 

8 Encore channels, 6 Starz channels, 3 Movieplex channels, Flix, Showtime, Spike, Cinemax, Sundance, CINE, CMT, FOX, HBO, Action, EPIX, EACT, OVTV, REEL, and several other non-commercial channels.

 

But TCM is driving away its old-classic film viewer base by continuing with this trend. This is driving more old classic movie fans away from TCM and away from expensive cable TV in general.

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If you adhere to the belief that a "classic" movie is one that upholds a certain standard in film making, then what you say is right.

 

It would be why a movie like QUIZ SHOW would be suitable on TCM, while TEEN AGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES would NOT.

 

Sepiatone

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Some people want more modern movies shown on TCM because TCM is the cheapest non-commercial movie channel and they don't want to have to pay for these more modern-movie channels:

 

8 Encore channels, 6 Starz channels, 3 Movieplex channels, Flix, Showtime, Spike, Cinemax, Sundance, CINE, CMT, FOX, HBO, Action, EPIX, EACT, OVTV, REEL, and several other non-commercial channels.

 

It's not just that, it's that the "good" recent movies on those channels are mixed in with so many dreadful ones, not to mention that they're spread out from one channel to another. TCM is the one channel that's a "one stop choice" for commercial-free, first rate movies from nearly every era, even if its *emphasis* is (rightly, IMO) on movies from the 20's through the 50's.

 

But TCM is driving away its old-classic film viewer base by continuing with this trend. This is driving more old classic movie fans away from TCM and away from expensive cable TV in general.

 

With all due respect, I think the evidence for that assertion is purely anecdotal, since TCM doesn't even participate in any sort of Nielson or other eyeball surveys.

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If one were to turn on a station that plays Classical Music, would you expect to hear rock and roll or rap music ? I think not ! The same thing can be said about TCM, Turner 'CLASSIC' Movies !

 

No, but you'd hear Bartok and Prokofiev, not just Bach and Beethoven. Some people complain about that, too.

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>In some cases, a film from the post-code era is a welcome change-- and still a classic.

 

 

That is not the problem. The problem is the junkers, the turkeys, the low-budget random cheapo films from the 60s-90s that is the problem. Chinatown was an Oscar winning and Oscar nominated film. It was not a random turkey.

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Maybe I just don't take it all as seriously as others, but I enjoy the variety of films shown. I do sometimes scratch my head re some of the cheap, silly stuff from the 60's and 70's. But I still watch some of them with a sense of wonder at how they even got greenlighted.

 

My pref is for 30's- early 50's but I love the "reality" of the more gritty films of the 70's.

 

"Classic" perhaps should refer to films with certain nobility, reputation, influence, etc.

 

I think for the under 55 (I'm in that category for 3 more days), or shall we say the under 45 set, the 70's would tend to be the classic era if they are at all interested in movie history. The generation of Pacino, DeNiro, Hackman, Hoffman, Nicholson, Fonda and Streep, I think, are the ones these people may think of as the last great generation of actors and may want to see what the fuss was.

I for one would love to see those films shown more frequently. I myself have never seen The Conversation, Taking of Pelham 1,2,3, The Deer Hunter, Apocalypse Now, Klute or I Never Sang for My Father. These are the films that should be shown.

 

I kind of think that TCM should produce short documentaries on many of the classic actors from the so called Golden Age. These in addition to the post 1969 films could be a way to entice more of the younger set to actually crave the films we all love so much. I think TCM could be many different things to many different people.

 

Another idea could be that if they choose to highlight the Pacino generation of film actors they could also program films of John Garfield, Monty Clift, Brando, alongside so that they can see the guys that influenced them.

 

Just thinking out loud.

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I for one would love to see those films shown more frequently. I myself have never seen The Conversation, Taking of Pelham 1,2,3, The Deer Hunter, Apocalypse Now, Klute or I Never Sang for My Father. These are the films that should be shown.

 

I'm not sure about Apocalypse Now, but all the other films you've mentioned have either played or are currently scheduled. The Conversation is showing on October 30th, Klute is showing on December 27th, and the others have already shown at least once in the past three years.

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>I do sometimes scratch my head re some of the cheap, silly stuff from the 60's and 70's.

 

yogi, THAT is the problem..... TCM showing the really bad films of the 60s and 70s, and in prime time. Many of them were the types of films that most of us didn't bother seeing when they were in the theaters back in those days.

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FCD, I get that but to me that's the fun part. I was alive but a bit too young to have gone and seen these movies. I probably wouldn't have if I could have. I find it fascinating to see some of these films. The total crap that is shown, of course one needn't watch it all the way through to see it has no social significance.

 

But right now I'm watching Come September with Rock Hudson from 1961. It's not a great film and maybe even not a very good movie but it's fun, light and nice to see Walter Slezak, Bobby Darin and Sandra Dee (currently reading their sons' bio of them. What a messed up couple!

 

I like seeing Hollywood from all angles.

 

To each his own.

 

Andy, I know that those films have been shown but they don't air them often and I haven't been aware of the schedule at times. I'll get to them eventually. Thanks for the info.

 

Edited by: yogiboo on Oct 20, 2013 6:44 PM

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"Some people want more modern movies shown on TCM because TCM is the cheapest non-commercial movie channel and they don't want to have to pay for these more modern-movie channels:

 

8 Encore channels, 6 Starz channels, 3 Movieplex channels, Flix, Showtime, Spike, Cinemax, Sundance, CINE, CMT, FOX, HBO, Action, EPIX, EACT, OVTV, REEL, and several other non-commercial channels.

 

But TCM is driving away its old-classic film viewer base by continuing with this trend. This is driving more old classic movie fans away from TCM and away from expensive cable TV in general. "

 

 

I agree with the Fred's comments. But I must say I enjoy watching the movies TCM shows during the morning and afternoon on Monday - Friday. Many of these old movies I have never seen. Thanks to TCM I am getting to see actors and actresses that I was not familiar with their work. And if not for TCM showing them - I am afraid these movies would be forgotten.

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Remember before TCM when American Movie Classics first came on cable? They didn't have commercials and they didn't show newer movies. They were TCM before TCM. I hated it when it changed, and we always need an outlet for old classics. Hopefully, TCM will stay with old classics, but it is relative. As we get older, those movies of the 60's and 70's become the old movies to young people.

 

At least AMC redeemed itself with its original programming. They should splinter off into two outlets in the future. Original programming and more recent movies, and then an older movie channel.

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Every movie shown today was made between 1935 and 1953.

 

While people have legit concerns that TCM is increasing the percentage of programming devoted to post 1968 movies, implying TCM rarely shows pre 1968 movies doesn't help made this case.

 

i.e. typically being over the top makes one's POV less respectable.

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Thank you TCM for Two Girls and a Sailor(1944) Wednesday night. You made the world a better place for broadcasting such a beautiful, positive story for a few hours. And what fun to see Van Johnson and June Allyson when they were so young. And what a dish Gloria DeHaven was. Jimmy Durante and Gracie Allen were great too. How fun to see a time when actors/actresses had personality and character.

 

Thank you.

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