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matthew.kleinmann

Enough with the pan and scan short!

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The pan and scan short was interesting the very first time I saw it, but it grows old fast, and they seem to have left out one very very important piece of information. Panning and scanning was downright necessary.

 

Say what?

 

Yup, it was just shy of a necessity. Here is the deal. I have a larger sized consumer plasma TV. I think it is a 60". It has a native 16:9 or very close to it, aspect ratio. Even with this wide screen aspect ratio, on the extreme aspect ratio film formats, CinemaScope for example, I will have a black bar that is a good 7" wide at the top and bottom of my screen. I would guess that about 2/5ths of my screen is letterboxed out.

 

Now, think about the heyday of when they did the panning and scanning. You sat in front of a whopping 27" CRT screen with a 4:3 aspect ratio. Now think about what the letterboxing and overall picture size would be? My guess is that you would wind up with about a 2" tall scrip of video across the center of a black screen. Not real watchable.

 

I also get a chuckle out of the whole redirecting the movie. In fact it has become a running joke in the house. Every time my wife gets up and blocks part of the screen, she is re-directing the movie. Ditto with the dogs barking. Let's not even get into the doorbell ringing or my nasty habit of playing on the computer when I really don't like a movie all that much. What I would like to know is how do you get paid for all this re-directing labor I have been doing all these years for for free?

 

And the last comment is the film snobness. I have seen that clip many many times and I have yet to hear any mention of the over scan they use on classic TV programs so they fill the entire width of your new 16:9 aspect ratio screens. They are re directing every tv show ever made from the start of TV until what, 2010? I don't hear them crying about that.

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I get the heebie-jeebies thinking about "matthew.kleinmann" panned and scanned. ;-)

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I've seen that short so many times that I can mouth every statement before it is said. Whenever they need about 5 minutes to kill, that's the one they use.

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While I agree with most of what you've said here Matt, especially about maybe TCM contemplating shelving that short for at least a year or two, it appears you might be slightly misinformed as to why the channels which present classic sitcoms have decided to stretch the image of those old programs.

 

You see, contrary to your thought that it's done to fill the entire width of your 60 inch plasma television set, it's ACTUALLY done in efforts to make those old sitcoms look more relevant to today's television viewing public.

 

Yep, because THIS procedure makes everyone from Lucille Ball to Dick Van Dyke to Bob Newhart look just as FAT as most Americans are TODAY!!!!

 

(...yep, it's so people just like that dumb fat idiot with the "bad back" who very recently pushed that boulder over in that National Park can more identify with those great old sitcom stars of the past!!!)

 

LOL

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Well, Jackie is(or maybe that should be "was") just the exception that proves my point here, finance!

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And there are people who complain why are movies Letterboxed. Even with the repeat of the short, some still don't get it. Many don't watch TCM and it should be shown on other channels and decrease the amount time given on TCM.

 

I enjoyed widescreen since 1993 and try to obtain as many movies as possible in that format.

 

I think that short is ignored as much as the HD's adjustment.

 

Some day these may connect.

neuron_forest.jpg

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>And there are people who complain why are movies Letterboxed

 

The promo is repeated so often for young people, for the most highly prized TV demographic group. These people don't understand why all films are not in color and are not in the 16:9 format to match the shape of their LCD TV screens. They don't understand why color films like Gone With The Wind are not in Cinemascope. TCM needs a promo to explain 4:3 to these kids.

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I doubt that would work, Fred. I mean, THINK about it here!

 

Tryin' to get kids to understand that stuff actually happened BEFORE they were BORN?!!!

 

(...nope, sorry...I don't think kids are really open to THAT "possibility" much anymore, are THEY???)

 

LOL

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Well, pan and scan definitely sucks, and thank God for TCM's practice of avoiding it (unless unavoidable - Joel Mccrea film "Wichita" for example), but the short has been worked to death. It seems to be a time filler at this point.

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Speaking of time fillers. how about one of the Maureen O'Hara "word of mouths", in which she talks about John Wayne. She mentions how close they were as friends, and three sentences later, says that John Ford ordered her to drive Wayne home, but she had no idea where he lived. Huh?

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I wish the network would air the "Pan & Scan" short during TCM Underground, where a number of recent widescreen offerings have been broadcast in 4:3 cropped transfers.

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Some youngsters found a way around it, Fred. One of my nephews set his Dad's TV to a compressed ratio and zoomed the picture so the letterboxing wouldn't show. Made every widescreen DVD he played look like an El Greco painting. The kid eventually moved out and got his own TV, but it took my brother-in-law a WEEK to figure out how to correct it.

 

As far as that short goes, yeah, I get the message already!

 

Sepiatone

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>Speaking of time fillers. how about one of the Maureen O'Hara "word of mouths", in which she talks about John Wayne. She mentions how close they were as friends, and three sentences later, says that John Ford ordered her to drive Wayne home, but she had no idea where he lived. Huh?

 

Interesting post. I am sure that after Ford ordered her to drive Duke home, she never forgot where he lived! My understanding is that happened on the set of one of their first films together, probably when she was still getting to know Duke. They did become life-long friends.

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TCM should also let viewers know which aspect ratio each movie was shot in, as opposed to just letting us know it is "widescreen"; that way, we can adjust the aspect ratio on our tv sets accordingly. Mind you, it isn't hard to figure out most of the time, at least with the 4:3 movies, but there are some that takes a bit of guessing.

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>Ahem. I am a teenager and I love classic films and TCM.

 

Ahem. Then are you old enough to have heard the expression: "The exception that proves the rule"??? ;) LOL

 

(...sorry, couldn't resist...glad to hear that there are at least a FEW "Yoots" out there that appreciate the classics)

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It seems like it's on daily. Almost every time I tune in, its on between films. Really old...........Cant they come up with some new "filler?"

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What is wrong with you people!*&%$#!?

 

What true film fan does not love seeing the same clip from "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" or as it is known by the cognescenti "The Rape of the Sabine Women", every day of one's life?

 

I look forward daily to turning on TCM and seeing only about half of the brothers and call girls,oops...I mean brides, dancing themselves around like whirling dervishes.

 

Who cares if I can't see all the brothers, as I only really have a crush on Russ Tamblyn.

 

And as for El Greco, well with his astigmatism he would not have even noticed if Popeye's Olive Oyl was one of the dancers or if it was Jane Powell anyway.

 

I also enjoy seeing Maureen O'Hara and her story about John Wayne even though it makes no sense since if she is taking him home, why does she think he lives at the Beverly Hills Golf Course? I do enjoy hearing her say that this is where "all the really BIG male stars played" but still...

 

Did John Wayne live at the club, and was she going to drop him off at Tee #1? Also why have the couple John asked for drinks from, not been contacted by TCM for a contrasting viewpoint?

 

Why didn't she take John Wayne to that restaurant that Ben Mankiewicz visited, where Marion Morrison was supposed to have slept overnight in a booth?

 

Edited by: CaveGirl on Oct 24, 2013 2:50 PM

 

Edited by: CaveGirl on Oct 24, 2013 2:51 PM

 

Edited by: CaveGirl on Oct 24, 2013 2:52 PM

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...and, at the risk of offending those with Christian sensibilities, I don't care if I see all the disciples. I don't even know who they all are. Pan and scan to your heart's content.

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Apropos of that, Finance I was in Milan recently and went to see the Last Supper by Leonardo on the wall of that refectory and guess what...those disciples or apostles or whatever, have FEET in the original fresco.

 

You can see clearly all thirteen pairs of feet, if you get up close to the railing and squint.

 

But if I saw only eight pair of feet, I'd be okay with that too.

 

Speaking of Last Supper shots and tableaux, the best one I ever saw was in Bunuel's film "Viridiana".

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I figure that the fewer feet I see, the better. I'm definitely not a foot fetishist. That's why I hang out at the lingerie department at K-Mart, not the Ladies' Shoes department.

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