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In tonight's film, House of Wax, and several other's I cannot immediately recall, there are intermissions which last only 15-20 seconds. My question is.. how does this work in a theater where I'm sure it must have been a longer period of time? I'm guessing there is only a true 15-20 seconds of intermission which, obviously, is not enough for a theater event and the projectionist stops the film for the desired time..? Maybe..? I dunno.

 

15-20 seconds is not enough time to go you-know-where and the snack bar - either or both.

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In every cinema i've ever been to there was only one intermission halfway through the movie for about 10 or 15 minutes.

My guess is that those short intermissions were put in when movies were sold or licensed to tv to insert commercials.

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No, the HOUSE OF WAX, DIAL M FOR MURDER and other intermission cards of that era were for 3-D presentations. This was to give theater patrons a chance to rest their eyes half way through the film.

 

Non-3D films with intermissions built-in were epic-length spectacles that gave patrons a chance to hit the wash room without missing any of the picture!

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>No, the HOUSE OF WAX, DIAL M FOR MURDER and other intermission cards of that era were for 3-D presentations. This was to give theater patrons a chance to rest their eyes half way through the film.

 

Aha! Thank you, Ray :)

 

I gave the 3D fad a shot just once when I was about 9 years old and I couldn't take it. I closed my eyes and listened to the remaining hour + of the movie.

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  • 1 month later...

No, Ray, the intermissions in 1950's 3-D films were to give the projectionist the opportunity to change reels, since both projectors in the typical booth were required to show each reel -- of which there were two -- one for the red anaglyph, and one for the green.

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Actually, they didn't show red and green feature films in the theaters in the 50s. You're right about the two projectors, but for left and right eyes. We watched films with exactly the same polarized glasses and they use today. Not sure where the red green myth started. That was always for print, or television. However, in the 20s there were a couple of films using that technique, and even in the 50s, I believe one or two shorts were done in red and green, but certainly no feature films.

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