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More dissent against The story of film


28Silent
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This episode I got the impression that the documentary film maker was being political,when discussion of foreign film making,from slip of jt most popular international films that made profits for euro corp catters.I got the impression than this doc was pitting foreign film making against English speaking film ,making to conquer and divide for entertainment.Now I;m a fan of foreign classic films ,especially if they are un popular and t.cm won't explore them,especially when it comes to bad history.But there was too much politics in this episode.The way that film maker dresses is very hypocritical .He thinks that the;s different .Mope he isn't different than most mainstream film makers with suits,just because he where a tee shirt instead 'Irritating

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I tend to like people who dress "hypocritically".

 

Like Ingrid Bergman as a nun, or Bing Crosby as a priest or Tony Randall as a Lover Boy.

 

So stone me!

 

By the way, I did not think there was enough "politics" in this installment of the Cousins' documentary.

 

Not enough sex or violence either, for that matter...

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Yes, Hibi from what I've seen, Cousins does wear the same t-shirt and no socks attire in every episode shown up to now.

 

I thought it was amusing too, since Robert Osborne is dressed up to beat the band and looks like he just got back from an official state funeral and Cousins looks like he just came in from walking the dog.

 

But I still like the documentary. Who cares if Cousins looks like Isaac Mizrahi on a bad day on the midway, if the documentary has some valid points to extoll about world cinema...

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Cousins has indeed brought up some historical nuggets throughout this documentary series (the first close-up: a kitten lapping milk! LOLcats have been around since the beginning of film!). But the narrative reads like a book badly in need of an editor. Discussing the original version of The Squaw Man while a later version of the film plays onscreen. Getting the sequence of epics - Cabiria - Birth of a Nation - Intolerance wrong. There are others. I'm surprised enough that some of these mistakes made it to the 2011 BBC original production, but not to correct them in the intervening 2 years? Did anyone else catch Cousins saying - when introducing eastern European films of the 1960's - that meanwhile, what was going on "behind the _Berlin Wall_?" Um, freedom and western Europe, Mr. Cousins! He actually confused the Berlin Wall with the Iron Curtain!

 

What am I to make of this series? A History of Marginally Commercial Films? A History of Films that Influenced Filmmakers? A History of Self-Indulgent Filmmakers that European Critics Adore? A better title for the series could have been: Beyond Hollywood: A History of Global Film.

 

Edited by: karlofffan on Oct 25, 2013 5:10 PM

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Though I may appear to be jocular about Cousins, I like him too, Swede!

 

I find his comments interesting and don't care if he wears a bathing suit while sitting with Osborne.

 

I've defended him continually from the onslaught of comments that seem denigrating and frankly, find the vehemence towards him rather interesting in a psychological way.

 

But then I've always found Groucho in full mustache and eyebrow gear, very arresting and not offputting.

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