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FEBRUARY SCHEDULE IS UP!


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The most obvious high points for me are:

*Babette's Feast* (1987)

*Gambit* (1966)

*The Ghost and Mrs. Muir* (1947)

*Anastasia* (1956)

 

I believe these are all premieres.

 

I notice an absence of both: Silent Sunday Night and TCM Imports on Sunday nights. I hope this is an aberration as I like those features very much!

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I would hope that the reason for the absence of SSN's and Imports is that February is part of the dreaded 31 days of Oscar. Hopefully they will return in March when the generic tent pole programming that is the bread and butter of this festival is over.

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Even though this year's Oscar festival has all of the usual suspects, I'm pleased and relieved that there are no modern junk included this time, only films from the silent era to no later than 1993. All of the best of the best films recognized by the Academy are being aired. In my opinion, this is the TCM that I know and love.

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As always, "31 Days" probably looks a lot more enticing to most TCM newcomers than it does to many of us who've been around a few years and have seen just about every last one of the selections, often more than once. Five years ago I would've circled half the movies on the schedule, but at a first quick glance the only true highlight I see is the second showing of the Jeanne Eagels version of The Letter. Too bad it's slotted for 6:15 AM, but that's what alarm clocks and / or DVD recorders are for.

 

Along these lines, you know what would be great? If TCM could somehow highlight all of its premieres. Was there a single one of these in this "31 Days" schedule? None that I could see of any interest.

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>I notice an absence of both: Silent Sunday Night and TCM Imports on Sunday nights. I hope this is an aberration as I like those features very much!

 

Sans,

 

*Silent Sundays* and *TCM Imports* usually go on hiatus during *31 Days* and return to the schedule in March after the last of the Oscar fest has completed its run.

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To anyone just discovering the wonderful world of classic movies or to anyone wanting to watch some old favorites, February will be a treasure trove. One of the spins on this year's Oscar month is an evening salute to some notable films of a particular year. Feb. 1 devotes a whole day to 1939.

 

The programmers have selected a number of films from the early years of Oscar--the Feb. 20 double feature of Jeanne Eagels in *The Letter* (1929) and Ruth Chatterton in *Madame X* (1930) should please pre-Code fans--and a generous helping of foreign films. Feb. 4 begins with three great favorites of mine: *La Strada, The Burmese Harp*, and *The Virgin Spring*, continues with one I haven't seen, *Closely Watched Trains*, and for good measure adds *The Battle of Algiers, Z*, and *Babette's Feast*. What a feast!

 

Deanna Durbin makes an appearance in *Three Smart Girls* on Feb. 10--the Universal vault slowly begins to open--and the Fox vault opens, too, with such films as *The Young Lions* and *The Ghost and Mrs. Muir*.

 

I've always been curious about *The Mark* (Feb. 20). *Gambit* (Feb. 17) is a treat I haven't seen in years. Naturally, I'm always glad to see *King Rat* on the TCM schedule, but it's usually in a late-night slot, but on Feb. 24 it's in prime time on the West Coast as one of the five films chosen from 1965 that evening. Got to record it for the intro! That's the most respect *King Rat* has been shown in quite some time. By the way, *King Rat's* Oscar nod was for Burnett Guffey's B&W cinematography.

 

Edited by: kingrat on Nov 7, 2013 5:49 PM

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using the rule of thumb from the TCM Programming Challenge, there's an article about Gambit in the database, so that's been shown before.

 

since there's no article about Babette's Feast, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, and Anastasia it's likely that none of the three has been shown before (and that also goes for The Young Lions). however, it is possible, however remote, that any one might have been on the schedule. (it just happens there's no article.) someone who has schedules back to 1994 can look it up. (a computer's faster though.)

 

i'm looking forward to seeing all of these five movies. in the case of The Young Lions it's been more than 50 years since i've seen it.

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LA STRADA, on the 4th. I read an article that Pope Francis is somewhat of a film buff and that's his favorite film. I wonder if he'd like to be guest co-host that night.I'll bet Robert O. would love a trip to Rome

 

Edited by: markfp2 on Nov 7, 2013 8:46 PM

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> lzcutter wrote:

> Silent Sundays and TCM Imports usually go on hiatus during 31 Days and return to the schedule in March after the last of the Oscar fest has completed its run.

 

I thank you for that information. I had forgotten that we must endure a month of this each year.

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> Hibi wrote:

> Gambit was up for an Oscar? Must be a technical one......

 

I like the movie very much but my initial sentiment was similar because it is simple entertainment. The performances were very good but I did not find any of them to be great stretches for the actors.

 

Upon reading obrienmundy's response I understand the nominations as the costumes and sets were quite wonderful.

 

I believe Shirley MacLaine should have received some nature of special award for being so quiet and refined in the first half of the movie. ;)

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> obrienmundy wrote:

> The same thing happens in August due to Summer Under the Stars but many members love that month. (August, that is) I know I do.

 

Each month has movies which I like very much and movies which are not to my taste.

 

What Summer Under the Stars means for me is that movies which I like are mostly concentrated on certain days rather than strewn throughout the schedule.

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For me the treasures of this year are:

 

'The Young Lions' (1958), which is one of the Brando movies that TCM never seems to show. (Also in that category is 'Desiree', but it's the one Brando had absolutely no interest in making and it shows - the very least of all Brando movies. Still, it's a rare chance to see it.)

 

'You're a Big Boy Now' (1966) is an utterly charming early Coppola effort with a very fine cast that was scheduled last summer but was subsequently removed from the schedule. I'm very much hoping it sticks this time.

 

'The Mark' (1961) is a rare opportunity. Saw it 50 years ago, when Stuart Whitman was an up and coming actor, and have never forgotten it for its sensitive portrayal of a man trying to live with his pedophiliac past. It's highly doubtful that anybody would even try to make this movie in today's atmosphere.

 

'Tess' (1980) is a lovely yet almost disturbing Polanski effort - disturbing as its subject is a young, budding female and the movie was made immediately following his flight from the U.S. to escape charges of sexual knowledge of a young female.

 

'Shampoo' (1975). I can't help but wonder months in advance as to whether TCM will actually show this movie truly uncut.

 

As always, there are many good and even great movies during the 31 days, especially if one hasn't already watched them to death.

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You're a Big Boy Now was removed from the schedule last summer for the Andy Griffith memorial tribute. I don't recall TCM ever rearranging the schedule for a memorial during Oscar month, which I guess is one good thing about Oscar month.

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There are quite a few movies that I'm looking forwarrd to seeing, especially the following:

 

A THOUSAND CLOWNS (1965)

TESS (1980)

THE SEARCH (1948)

YOU'RE A BIG BOY NOW (1966)

BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID (1969)

THE YOUNG LIONS (1958)

THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG (1964)

THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR (1947)

SHAMPOO (1975)

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What I like about the Oscar month is that it usually brings some seldom-shown titles from Paramount and Fox. Last year we had HOLD BACK THE DAWN, and this year it's Olivia in THE HEIRESS. Also, STALAG 17 is back which is always a good thing.

 

I think someone else mentioned DESIREE, from Fox...and the schedule even has WILSON again. So I am happy with these extra-special selections.

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*There are quite a few movies that I'm looking forwarrd to seeing, especially the following:*

 

*THE SEARCH (1948)*

 

I always kind of rag on Hollywood movies with war themes, as they've always seemed to focus solely on American soldiers and give particular short shrift to the civilians who were caught up in the crossfire.

 

But The Search . . . . God, what a beautiful film. Montgomery Clift was perfect, Aline MacMahon was exactly as I'd imagined her to be in real life, and the two foreign actors, Ivan Jandl and Jarmila Novotna, played their parts as if they'd been rehearsing them during the war itself. Throw in that it was filmed amidst the ruins of Germany, and it conveys a sense of realism that you almost never see from MGM.

 

 

*THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG (1964)*

 

Another anomalous favorite of mine, as I usually can't stand musicals. But this one is so, well, different, and so utterly captivating in its sheer improbability (every line is sung, rather than spoken) that it just charmed me out of my seat. I can hardly wait to see these two again.

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I don't remember whether or not TCM has shown "State Fair" (1933), but I'm really looking forward to it. Fox Movie Channel has shown it and the print was pretty iffy, so I hope they can provide something better to TCM. The print which AMC showed way back when was nasty too, so maybe that's all there is. "Journey To The Center of The Earth" (1959) has always been a guilty pleasure, so it'll be fun to see on TCM. I agree with the others that both "You're A Big Boy Now" and "Gambit" are ones to watch for.

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I usually eschew Oscar month, but either this time it's a bit different, or I've become more easy-going about it. In any case, there are many movies I'm looking forward to:

 

*The Age of Innocence* (1993) -- love the 1934 version; my friend, Miriam Margolyes, is in the 1993 version; I've never seen it.

*Battle of Algiers* -- this film is incredible.

*Little Women* (1933) -- The Yankee GWTW, and a much better film.

*The Green Years* -- Favorite A.J. Cronin adaptation.

*Caged* -- Pile out you tramps! Parker should have won the Oscar.

*A Man and a Woman* -- Sweet movie with nice dentist-office music.

*A Passage to India* -- The underrated masterpiece of David Lean, far better than LOA.

*Anthony Adverse* -- one of the truly sumptuous films of old Hollywood, with perhaps the most sophisticated music score ever.

*Tom Jones* -- The favorite film of my early teens.

*She Done Him Wrong* -- At last, a Mae West film! Lou, you look so lovely!

*Journey to the Center of the Earth* (1959) -- The favorite film of my young boyhood; I still love it.

*Madame X* (1929) -- Never seen it. Should be shown with Chatterton's Frisco Jenny, a sort of an inverted Madame X.

*Wilson* -- Monumental and totally enjoyable bio-pic. Really amazing.

*All This, and Heaven Too* -- Bette at her sweet best; this film shares a character with Anthony Adverse.

 

Plus the best films of Greer Garson and a great selection of foreign films. Good month!

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> 'The Mark' (1961) is a rare opportunity. Saw it 50 years ago, when Stuart Whitman was an up and coming actor, and have never forgotten it for its sensitive portrayal of a man trying to live with his pedophiliac past. It's highly doubtful that anybody would even try to make this movie in today's atmosphere.

 

There has been a film that has dealt with pedophilia. It was 1998's Happiness directed by Todd Solondz. The film is about the lives of three sisters, their families and those around them.

 

One of the sisters, Trish Maplewood is married to psychiatrist Bill who unbeknownst to Trish is a pedophile.

 

The movie is really well made but is also for adults only due to it's highly controversial heavily laden sexual themes, particularly the pedophile scenes. I liked the film mainly due to the story and the acting. All well known supporting actors today.

 

Roger Ebert rated #5 on his top films for 1998.

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