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The Movie You Never Want to See Again...


CaveGirl
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because it was too good!

 

Okay, I saw a film many moons ago which to me epitomizes what a great drive-in movie should be like. I've never heard of it again, it is never mentioned anywhere I travel online* as a great film and seems to have no following.

 

But when I saw it, I found it devastating.

 

The film was called "Buster and Billie". You would never from the cast think it is any great shakes, as no one famous but Jan-Michael Vincent was in it I think. I shall give my synopsis totally from a one-time viewing, so excuse any inaccuracies and don't tell me where I'm wrong as it might make me suicidal.

 

Spoilers alert!

 

As I recall, the film is set in a small Southern town, rather rural. There is a girl in school called Billie who seems sweet but lives shall we say, on the wrong side of the tracks and becomes for the guys in high school the most willing partner for backwoods romance. Somehow she makes the acquaintance of Buster who is one of most popular boys in school, probably since a liaison with her is recommended by his buddies.

 

What is interesting about this film, is...the romance is played out in a backward fashion. The first encounter between B and B is a major one, but then as times goes on, Buster starts to view Billie as more than a conquest and treats her little by little as a girlfriend, and less happens between them each time they go out except for caring gestures and real conversations. Then tragedy occurs...because Buster has now romantically removed the other guys outlet for easy sexual encounters, they want him to dump Billie for good. What happens next, I shall not reveal...

 

I remember the ending but won't post it here. At least I think I remember it but that's beside the point.

 

This movie was so good, and my memories of it so strong and complimentary that I don't think I ever want to see it again, and ruin my perception of it. Maybe it was not as good as I thought but who cares.

 

So what movie do you not want to ever see again because it was so fabulous and, because it just might change your opinion?

 

*yes I know it is listed with some brief comments on IMDB, but I'm saying overall it is not highly praised or mentioned much amongst film forums

 

Edited by: CaveGirl on Nov 9, 2013 3:10 PM

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'Buster and Billie' is an excellent movie. My ex-wife was a dirt-poor farm girl who'd grown up secluded with a bad stepfather. I knew she'd identify strongly with Billie and so I coaxed her to stay up and watch it one night - but I let her watch it on her own because I knew she'd prefer it that way. I knew from the other room how devastated she was. Took her quite a while to turn off the tears.

 

For me, the one movie I wish I'd never seen - never want to see again is 'Sophie's Choice'.

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That sounds like a good one. The story of their "backwards" relationship sounds a little like "Dogfight", with River Phoenix as a young Marine who feels a growing attraction to Lily Taylor, the girl he asked to a "see who can find the homliest girl" contest his buddies organized. I get why it's not always a good idea to test long-held memories about a movie by seeing it again. My own example would be "Joe Hill", which was a last-minute replacement for another movie which the distributor couldn't supply at my local theater in the winter of 1971. There were about a dozen of us in line; some people grumbled and left but I stayed and was blown away. It was Bo Widerberg's follow-up to "Elvira Madigan", which had been fairly successful in the States, also with Thommy Berggren. It combined gritty realism and lush romanticism in a way I'd never seen before and the memory has stayed with me for all these years. After that it basically disappeared. By chance a few years later I saw a listing for it at a film society showing at M.I.T. and hitchhiked in a snow storm to see it. That viewing only increased my admiration, but it's now been about 40 years and even though it's always been near the top of my must-see list, I have that same feeling that you do, that seeing it now after all this time could spoil the memory. Your post has made me wonder if I really want to see it or not. In any case, the chances are slim because it's never been on VHS or DVD. I grew up in the era when chances of seeing a "small" movie again were slight, unless it showed up on late night TV and you were willing to stay awake, so I'm conditioned to keeping them alive in my memory, the way you seem to be. I think you're right; with some movies, memory is the best way to honor them.

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The movie that comes to mind that I never want to see again is "Ordinary People." I saw it when it first came out. I agree that it's an excellent movie, but it just hit too close to home, and I've always felt that I could not possibly get anything more out of the movie by watching it a second time. And I never have.

 

Terrence.

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"Ordinary People" is tough, but the optimistic ending to me makes up for it. Timothy Hutton's character seems on the road to recovery at the end. The mother is revealed to be the cold, shallow peron she really is - surface appearance is what matters to her. The father is able to tell her "i don't think I love you any more." and the son and father are far better off without her.

I think it is a movie about healing and a message that some people - even if, as here, a wife or mother - actually are not worth keeping in your life. Something many people in real life have a hard time coping with, or accepting - and this movie can help make that process easier, because damaging reltionships are just that - damaging.

 

For the fortunate for whom this dysfunctional family's story is very alien, I can understand why this would be too much of a downer, in spite of the "healing" that is the climax, which inludes the mother's exit.

 

And I agree - "Sophie's Choice" - once was enough.

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I saw "Buster and Billie" and it was a good movie. It was a little shocking at the time for one thing because of a full frontal nudity moment of the star - Jan-Michael Vincent. But good for him, because I remember reading at the time it was his idea, because he said if Joan Goodfellow (Billie) had to do it, he would too.

 

Maybe if the movie had had a happier outcome it would be a movie more would want to see or return to.

 

(PS - speaking of actors not aging well, whew! J-M Vincent's life style REALLY did him in. Truly sad.)

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Your "Joe Hill" experience reminded me of one I had as a kid, but it was quite the opposite. My friends and I went to see "Son of Flubber" on opening day, the first showing of the day. However the print had not arrived yet, and so the theatre told us at the box office they were showing instead the movie which had been playing- we were already there so we saw it - a truly horrible movie called "Wild and Wonderful" with Tony Curtis. It was neither wild nor wonderful and hell would be having to sit through it again.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks to WBS, Dougie, Terrence, Joe and Roverrocks for mentioning some good choices and a few I want to revisit.

 

Vertigo, you are so right about time and tide doing in JMV. He went from being a pretty boy to, uh well...a competitor for the Jack Elam Award.

 

What the heck happened? If this is what drink, drugs and fighting do to one, I shall be stopping today.

 

Actually...no drugs have ever entered my system since I am way out without needing any artificial stimulation.

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"Chariots of Fire"

 

A beautifully made and acted film. But it was soooo damn boring. I mean how long can you watch men running in slo-mo on a beach. { don't say it}. It beat out "Raiders of the Lost Ark", "On Golden Pond", "Atlantic City" and "Reds" for best picture.

 

In all the years since, I have heard people say "I'm going to watch "Raiders" again tonight or "On Golden Pond" or "Atlantic City", even "Reds", including myself, but not once have I ever heard them say "I'm going to watch Chariots of Fire again tonight"......

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Roy,

 

I'm with you on *Chariots of Fire* !

 

Another one for me is the musical remake of *Lost Horizon*.

 

I saw it on its original run and fell asleep about half way through (incredibly out of character for me). Woke up for the last part.

 

Never need to see what I missed. What I saw of the first half and the end was enough to convince me that I didn't miss much.

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Dale,

 

I,'m with you on "Lost Horizon". I didn't fall asleep, but I left before it was over. I think it was renamed "Lost Investment" by many.. If I remember rightly it made the list of 50 worst films of all time..

 

By the way, did you get my message re: the record.?

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Clint Eastwood's "Million Dollar Baby". So very good and just so depressingly sad after the "ring" accident. I don't think I want to experience such a traumatically devastating and emotional movie again. Eastwood just gripped my heart and ripped it apart in that movie. I don't even like thinking about the final third of the movie.

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No doubt "Ordinary People" requires a certain frame of mind to handle. The book is even more traumatic since it digs much deeper into the heads of the characters, but also riveting. Both the film and the book are excellent. What I took from the film are the performances. I thought Donald Sutherland's may have been his best, and Timothy Hutton was terrific. But my most lasting memory of the film is Mary Tyler Moore. The character is such a departure for her, and even more so in 1980 after the recent end of her sitcom's run. I realize actors are just doing a job, but I have never been able to look at Mary the same way since that role. Even when I view reruns of her own show and "The Dick Van Dyke Show" something in the back of my mind reminds me of "Ordinary People". I know this may sound unfair holding a role against an actor, but I can't seem to help it. Do any of the rest of you have this happen to you with actors?

 

By the way, "Caddyshack II" will never be viewed in my home again (traumatic for other reasons).

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One of the worst films I've ever seen was a film by David Lynch that starred Laura Dern. Cant remember the name of it (5-10 years old). Was sheer torture. Scenes repeated over and over. So boring and pointless.........Wouldn't even wish it on my worst enemy.......

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All those John Hughes teen and young adult movies of the 80's. At the time I was totally in love with them. But now, as an adult, I wouldn;t even watch them with my kids. There's something about seeing a movie at that age that in some superficial way, makes you go, "Wow. That movie was totally about me and my friends" even if as an adult, you realize that it totally wasn't. (Still like the soundtracks though. ) I also doubt I'd still like TV shows like Family Ties and The Cosby Show that I watched religiously at the time. I still enjoy reruns of Roseanne and The Wonder Years though.

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LOL. No thanks!

 

3 HOURS long (and it felt double that) I'm amazed I didn't leave, but I remember they were doing work on the house next to me and I didn't want to go home and listen to that.........

 

Edited by: Hibi on Nov 27, 2013 3:02 PM

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  • 2 weeks later...

This is going to sound weird but the movie I thought I'd never want to see again was Touch of Evil. Strangest damn thing I ever saw but after a few years I sat through it again and got that "Citizen Kane" feeling. Like I was looking at something special. Very very odd but special.

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Isn't it something how that happens? I have experienced this a number of times over the years-- both ways too. It is much more common for "great" pictures from youth to lose their luster as the years roll on. For me, many of the "midnight movies" that I was excited about as a teen or young adult such as "The Warriors", "The Song Remains the Same", "Dawn of the Dead", and "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" do not provide the same adrenaline rush that they did 30+ years ago. These films as well as many others I do still enjoy, but merely from a nostalgic point of view.

 

On the other hand, I have shared your experience with films that have improved with further viewings. I suppose we are not the only ones. Even Leonard Maltin has obviously had this happen. There are numerous examples in his movie guide where films have gone from bombs 20 editions ago to 3-stars or more now. I guess we should never completely give up on some films.

 

Of course, there are still plenty that are lousy that stay lousy too.

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