Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
sapphiere

Tyrone Power for SOTM May 2014

Recommended Posts

I would argue that The Sun Also Rises is the one performance of Ty Power's later career that is not impressive. To be fair, Jake Barnes is a difficult role for an actor to play.

 

Agree. In a way, the role of Jake plunged Power back into those rather cardboard beautiful boy roles he had rather stiffly walked through early in his career. Only now, the character has literally been neutered and doesn't have the edge his earlier charming heel characters possessed to give Power something interesting to do. His Jake could almost be seen as symbolic of his career. The beautiful man every woman wanted but in the end, he was largely impotent in directing his career and never fully realized his potential as an actor.

 

(And I say this as an ardent fan.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It wasn't that they WERE too old for their roles. It's that they LOOKED too old for their roles. That's what hard living will do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is interesting that THE SUN ALSO RISES brought many viewpoints. I was happy to read all of them. TSAR will be the next movie that I order. In a interview on Dick Dinman`s radio show, Tyrone`s son said that his favorite of his father`s films was WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because of his father? It was Laughton, Dietrich, and Lanchester that stole the film. It was arguably the best film that Power was in, but many other films almost as good had Power in a larger or better role.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you. Tyrone was only in 30% of WITNESS OF THE PROSECUTION. In THE LONG GRAY LINE, he was in almost every scene.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>It wasn't that they WERE too old for their roles. It's that they LOOKED too old for their roles. That's what hard living will do.

 

I think they are all well-cast. Hemingway himself lived a hard life...and that is how his characters were usually written. The film still would've worked if they had all been in their 60s and looked 80. A lost generation can exist at any stage of life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>It was arguably the best film that Power was in, but many other films almost as good had Power in a larger or better role.

 

Witness for the Prosecution is an outstanding film but one of the reasons for that (aside from very clever writing and Billy Wilder's direction) is that it is distinguished by a terrific ensemble cast in which everyone distinguishes themself (I would argue Charles Laughton the most of all).

 

It is NOT a Tyrone Power star vehicle, unlike most of the other films of his career. For that reason, I am surprised that Power's son would pick it as his personal favourite over such great Power star efforts as Nightmare Alley or The Mark of Zorro.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hemingway hated the film version of Sun Also Rises, as he did most film adaptions of his work. One of his comment on the film was a decidedly derisive comment about an actor that he also couldn't stand when he stated that you know a film is in trouble when Errol Flynn is the best actor in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hemingway's works don't translate well to the screen because the author's voice isn't present. It works only when they use the bare bones of the plot and nothing else. The same thing is true of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novels.

 

As for Flynn: I assume that Hemingway was talking about the actor in his older days. When he was young, Flynn was handsome and alive and practically defined swashbuckling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*I think they are all well-cast. Hemingway himself lived a hard life...and that is how his characters were usually written. The film still would've worked if they had all been in their 60s and looked 80. A lost generation can exist at any stage of life.*

 

Well, THE Lost Generation specifically refers to young adult Americans, in their 20s, DURING the 20s, hanging out in Europe, confused and unsure as to what to do with their lives in the wake of World War One. THAT would not be something for people much older than those of which Hemingway was writing about, never mind his own personal life; by their 30s, most people know how they are going to proceed with their lives. So anyone older than say 30, would be incorrectly cast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sorry that Tyrone chose SOLOMON AND SHEBA as his last film role. Of course he did not know that this film would be his finale. Tyrone`s own production company, Copa Productions was producing the film. The costume epic was what he and his partner Ted Richmond could find financing. Ty was not in the best physical condition when he was making the film.The last swashbuckler epic that I enjoyed was THE CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, Hemingway had a personal antipathy towards Flynn that appears to have begun in 1937 when Errol got involved in the Spanish Civil War, presenting himself there as a journalist for the Hearst press.

 

Hemingway made a number of derogatory comments over the years about Flynn, including the actor's personal life. Flynn appeared to take the cracks at his expense in his stride, never, to the best of my knowledge, responding in kind towards the author (at least, in public).

 

A photo can be found of the two of them sharing a drink in a Havana bar, clearly taken in their later years.

 

That comment about Flynn's acting ability sounded like it was just Hemingway finding it irresistible to not take another shot at him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*A photo can be found of the two of them sharing a drink in a Havana bar, clearly taken in their later years.*

 

Could this be while Flynn was scouting and doing research for his CUBAN REBEL GIRLS?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>The last swashbuckler epic that I enjoyed was THE CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE.

 

Have you seen PRINCE OF FOXES, filmed in 1949 on location in Italy? It's never been a favourite of the critics but I've always considered it underrated. It's an extremely handsome production with some stunning photography capturing real castle battlements, and with great character work by Orson Welles as Cesare Borgia and Everett Sloane as an assassin who switches allegiances from one side to the other. The film also boasts great music by Alfred Newman.

 

Power may have put on a little weight by the time it was made but he's was still an impressive costume performer.

 

As far as Solomon and Sheba was concerned, since Power's own production company was involved in that film, the actor made a point of NOT having his heart checked out by doctors in spite of some tiredness he was experiencing. He was concerned that he would be uninsurable if a heart problem was discovered.

 

There is still a lot of Power footage from Solomon in existence. It would be great if someone would splice the takes together so Power fans would have a chance to see him at work on his final uncompleted performance. I admit, though, that it would also be a bit depressing, too

 

Here's a brief clip:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's possible. Flynn looks really rough in the shot.

 

ernest-hemmingway-errol-flynn-300x214.jp

 

Taken at Havana's El Floridita in 1959. Flynn would die later this same year, and Hemingway would follow two years later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>I would argue that The Sun Also Rises is the one performance of Ty Power's later career that is not impressive. To be fair, Jake Barnes is a difficult role for an actor to play. In between genuinely impressive work in both Abandon Ship and Witness for the Prosecution, Power is bland and dull in Sun Also Rises, in my opinion. (Nor does he look physically healthy). Errol Flynn, in a smaller but more colourful part, walks away with that film.

 

Tom, I will argue, in my humble opinion, that Tyrone Power was a superior actor than Errol Flynn. Flynn was charismatic and wonderful to be sure! But if you look at the different ranges of roles Power did (movies and radio), plus the fact that his performances on the stage were critically acclaimed as well, you must say that TP was the greater thespian! Again, in my opinion, the true mark of an actor is his or her ability to perform live, as well as on film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Max, my point was that Flynn was more impressive than Power in the one film they made together.

 

I think they were both consistently underrated as actors though Power's stage work showed that he was more serious about his craft as an actor than was Flynn. (Flynn took writing more seriously than he did acting though his self destructive lifestyle finally defeated him in that).

 

Flynn, in my opinion, was, at his prime, one of the most charming and charismatic of all Hollywood stars during his prime years, and a solid performer. He was the one action star of the Hollywood golden era who was equally effective in costume films, westerns and war dramas.

 

Also, unlike some other actors who were more celebrated than him during his time, Flynn's acting doesn't date. He is a convincing, understated performer, though usually typecast, to be sure, as an adventurer. Who else in film history, though, has been as convincing in costume attire?

 

I think Flynn was in a larger number of outstanding films at Warners (especially directed by masters like Curtiz and Walsh) than was Power at Fox. On the other hand, I don't think that he probably ever had as dramatically strong an opportunity as Power did with either Nightmare Alley or Abandon Ship. Power is quite wonderful in both those films, in my opinion.

 

Coincidence or not both actors gave one of their finest acting performances when directed by Edmund Goulding, a director supposedly at his best when directing actresses, Power in Nightmare Alley and Flynn in The Dawn Patrol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think Flynn could ever match Power's sensitivity in the Eddy Duchin Story, or his comedy talents in "The Luck of The Irish". When Flynn acted he was always Flynn... the way Clint Eastwood is always Clint Eastwood. You just love that same personality and charisma. But Power had the ability to transcend that, much the same way that Brando did... that versatility. Perhaps his work on stage gave him that!

 

I thought Flynn's best acting was in "Gentleman Jim", his favorite role, I understand?

 

BTW, Tom... can we not hijack a thread about TP and turn it into a treatise on Errol? Let Tyrone have his due?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Tom, I have seen PRINCE OF FOXES. The first collection of Tyrone`s dvd`s to be released in 2007 was the swashbuckler set. PRINCE OF FOXES was included. The movie deserved to be shot in color, but Zanuck did not want to spend the money. I found the script lacking. The plusses are Tyrone, Orson Welles, and the crafty Everett Sloane. In my opinion I preferred Wanda Hendrix in this film to Cecile Aubry in THE BLACK ROSE as the heroines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Max, I am so happy that you mentioned THE EDDY DUCHIN STORY and THE LUCK OF THE IRISH. Two entirely different roles and Tyrone was convincing in each of them. He practiced three months on a keyboard so director George Sidney could take front shots of him playing the piano. Kim Novak is especially beautiful in this film, and when they look at each other WOW!Maybe we are in the minority, but I never tire of watching this movie. Tyrone hadn`t made a comedy since 1939, but he hadn`t lost his touch with THE LUCK OF THE IRISH. I especially liked when he and Cecil Kellaway had scenes together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutel Sapphiere, although I would consider "The Mark of Zorro" to be a tongue in cheek comedy, as well as "The Black Swan". There are glimpses of TP's comedic skills in "Son of Fury", "A Yank in The RAF" and "Crash Dive". And Ty made Jack Benny laugh on his radio program... a feat seldom accomplished!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am glad that you enjoyed THE LONG GRAY LINE. Tyrone was believable as he aged throughout the movie. He was happy to be working with the Academy Award winning director, John Ford. A big thumbs up to Maureen O`Hara for her lovely performance as Ty`s wife.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Power and Flynn we're both adept at all types.of genres. Flynn did a number of comedies, of which I feel the best is FOURS A CROWD, and he had the right touch for it. However, the studio bosses realized by around 1940 that audiences preferred him in costume action films; WW2 saved him, insofar as it allowed him modern dress action movies, the war film. However, postwar, he seemed to be pegged into more costumers than ever. Btw, Errol also played in a comedic tongue in cheek manner in just about all his films, even morris than Ty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've loved Tyrone most of my life. On Youtube if you click on What's My Line , Tyrone appeared on the show in 1955, this was the time he was appearing on Broadway and the time of the release of *The Long Gray Line* . It's a lot of fun watching this video of Tyrone on YouTube, he looks gorgeous even with his beard and is absolutely charming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...