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SO BIG


HoldenIsHere
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I see the TCM review of SO BIG is negative and gives it only two stars, but I like this movie. I will say though it is probably an example of the parts being better than the whole.

 

The parts I love and can watch over and over are: all the scenes on the first day that Barbara Stanwyck (as Selina) comes to the Pool's farm, the lunch basket raffle, young Roelf Pool (who has a crush on Selina) making racket and interupting when Selina is tutoring Purvus De Jong (it breaks my heart when Roelf while playing his harmonica catches Purvus and Selina kissing), Roelf saying goodbye to Selina and leaving the books she lent him, Selina and Dirk ("So Big") sleeping in the wagon on their trip to the Haymarket.

I guess the part of the movie focusing on the adult Dirk is not as fulfilling as the first part of the movie.

 

This is the only movie that I am aware of that both Barbara Stanwyck and Bette Davis appeared in.

 

Anyway . . . "cabbages are beautiful"

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I love this film and Stanwyck is my favorite. The Jane Wyman version of *So Big* is also a very good film. So regardless of the stars given in the review, both versions imo deserve a better rating. And as far as I'm concerned two unforgettable lines in films are *Cabbages are Beautiful* and "the people that matter are *Emerald and Wheat* .

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  • 1 year later...

Tonight (05/27/15) TCM is airing the 1953 version of SO BIG  as part of the Sterling Hayden Star Of The Month tribute.

 

I've never seen this version, but I really like the 1932 version. 

 

It's interesting that TCM gives the 1932 pre-code version a TV-G rating while the 1953 version made when the code was in full effect is given a TV-PG rating.

 

I wonder what's in the 1953 version that is PG worthy? 

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Tonight (05/27/15) TCM is airing the 1953 version of SO BIG  as part of the Sterling Hayden Star Of The Month tribute.

 

I've never seen this version, but I really like the 1932 version. 

 

I think both versions are quite good. But I tend to favor Wyman's portrayal. She really had melodrama nailed in a way that other actresses just did not.

 

Colleen Moore starred in the first adaptation of this story in 1924. For more:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/So_Big_(1924_film)

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I was going to ask if TCM has ever shown the 1924 silent with Colleen Moore, but apparently it's lost...

 

tgwHORM.jpg

 

IbU8v24.jpg

 

 

EW1JbYS.jpg

 

 

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I was going to ask if TCM has ever shown the 1924 silent with Colleen Moore, but apparently it's lost...

 

tgwHORM.jpg

 

IbU8v24.jpg

 

 

EW1JbYS.jpg

 

 

yNuVZqU.jpg

 

 

ZMvAV9z.jpg

 

 

 

Sad. I didnt realize she had starred in the first version. :( Colleen gets little exposure on TCM....

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Like so many of you, I like both versions. I saw the Wyman version first, so it made the greatest impression on me. (Being a huge Jane Wyman fan certainly helps.) When I finally got to see the Stanwyck version, I fell in love with it also. The Wyman version is a bit longer, so they have the opportunity to go into more depth on the characters I'm glad that TCM gives us both versions and then lets us decide for ourselves.

 

Terrence.

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Like so many of you, I like both versions. I saw the Wyman version first, so it made the greatest impression on me. (Being a huge Jane Wyman fan certainly helps.) When I finally got to see the Stanwyck version, I fell in love with it also. The Wyman version is a bit longer, so they have the opportunity to go into more depth on the characters I'm glad that TCM gives us both versions and then lets us decide for ourselves.

 

Terrence.

 

 

Yes, overall I liked the Wyman version better as the Stanwyck version was much shorter and were bigger gaps in the narrative. The 50s version being longer filled in a lot more in the narrative. Both did an excellent job playing the character. I remember the Stanwyck version ending more on a downbeat note than this one with her son (same scene, but less happy)........

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Like so many of you, I like both versions. I saw the Wyman version first, so it made the greatest impression on me. (Being a huge Jane Wyman fan certainly helps.) When I finally got to see the Stanwyck version, I fell in love with it also. The Wyman version is a bit longer, so they have the opportunity to go into more depth on the characters I'm glad that TCM gives us both versions and then lets us decide for ourselves.

 

Terrence.

I think that's a good way to sum it up. 

 

Usually the first version we see is the one that makes the greatest impression and the other version will provide the comparison.

 

Wyman's close-ups in the fifties remake are phenomenal. She says so much with those eyes. And I thought there was a beautiful naturalness in her scenes with the children.  

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I recorded SO BIG to watch later.

 

I'm curious to see exactly what in the movie warranted the TV-PG rating.  

 

 

I cant think of anything, though there were some "naughty ladies" lingering when Selena went to market. But they were fully done up in Victorian clothing.......

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  • 2 weeks later...

I cant think of anything, though there were some "naughty ladies" lingering when Selena went to market. But they were fully done up in Victorian clothing.......

 

I still haven't watched the 1950s version of SO BIG yet. 

 

I'll keep my eyes and ears open for the TV-PG worthy content.

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