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Lorry_Driver
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With no disrespect, I have been exposed to these stories nearly my whole life and they no longer pique my interest.

 

I read The Warren Report as a young child and often reread many sections up until I was about 16. There were also many family discussions, as my grandmother was 100% Irish and wouldn't let us forget "her" President.

 

John F. Kennedy is my favorite President. His Presidency influenced me (as a child) in many ways. I miss our American Camelot.

 

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Well, actually, the first two documentaries, Primary and Adventures on the New Frontier have nothing to do with the assassination. The first is about the 1960 Wisconsin primary against Hubert Humphrey and the second was done in the first weeks of his presidency. But yes, there has been an abundance of JFK documentaries on Smithsonian, NatGeo, History Channel, PBS, CBS, NBC et al on that fateful day in Dallas in November 1963.

 

Very nice portrait of JFK by the way.

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I was born in 1972. I'm sick and tired of the whole Camelot garbage and the attempt to make the entire Kennedy family some sort of icons. Please can our political culture move beyond the 1960s?

 

CS Lewis died on November 22, 1963 too. Why not commemorate him instead?

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Hmmm. Apparently my post got sent twice, so I'll edit this one. Aldous Huxley died November 22, 1963, too. Perhaps TCM should have shown the 1940 version of *Pride and Prejudice* or the Orson Welles version of *Jane Eyre* since Huxley is credited with the screenplays to both films.

 

Edited by: Fedya on Nov 21, 2013 9:51 PM because there was apparently a double posting.

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>I was born in 1972. I'm sick and tired of the whole Camelot garbage and the attempt to make the entire Kennedy family some sort of icons. Please can our political culture move beyond the 1960s?

 

Evidently, all the presidents and kings from around the world who attended his funeral would disagree with you that his importance was mere artifice.

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I am going to agree with Kid and Fedya. I think this definitely deserves a place in history, but it has been overplayed and overemphasized and overdramatized for years.

 

I grew up in the 80s and for me, the Reagan years were my generation's Camelot. And the day that we ask, where were you when it happened, was the Challenger explosion in 1986.

 

For later generations, they probably ask, where were you when the World Trade Center was destroyed. Each generation has its defining moments.

 

The Kennedy era is but one era in our long continuous flow of American history.

 

Again, I am not trying to say one generation or one era is better than another and I do not intend disrespect to the Kennedy family. Just explaining why tonight's films do not resonate with me very much. And they don't need to, as far as I'm concerned.

 

I can pick and choose what portion of history I respond to. And so can you, or anyone, for that matter.

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You better go back and read Fedya's posts. He does not think the Kennedy's deserve any place in history. He was disrespectful of the family. It was mainly his use of the word garbage to describe Camelot and comparing them to some people named the Kardashians.

 

I'm not asking anyone to decide the significance of their legacy. I was just attempting to see why no one was commenting on tonight's programming

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One thing that has always struck me about these events, and which has not been highlighted is the conduct of Jacqueline Kennedy. From the little I have heard, she acted with presence of mind and sure insistence on what she felt was appropriate. She overrode objections to ride in the ambulance with John Kennedy to the hospital. Not much is spoken of her relation to him, but the shots of her in Faces of November show to me a picture of true misery. If this is any indication, she had strength of character, quiet dignity, and was truly a woman to be admired.

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Tonight I watched the Wisconsin Primary special.This week I watched two excellent JFK programs on CNN and PBS. Letters to Jackie is on my dvr. My parents voted for him, and I looked up to him and Jackie. When I was a sophomore in high school, the sad announcement came over the loud speaker. I was in history class, and the teacher said "what will other countries think of us".

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> One thing that has always struck me about these events, and which has not been highlighted is the conduct of Jacqueline Kennedy

 

Only recently, thanks to NBC news, I learned of the letter of condolence Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the widow of Officer Tibbit, the Dallas police officer who also was killed that day. It showed that Jackie had a level of class and character we'd never considered.

 

The significance of Kennedy is of the fact he was the only president assassinated in the 20th century. His presidential legacy is not one of particular greatness, although much could be reasoned his untimely death made anything he may have accomplished only a "what if" proposition. He made his presidential misteps as would and did presidents before and after him, and spearheaded many good programs for this country and the rest of the world. He wasn't in the office long enough to achieve any "greatness", but as long as he WAS in office, he certainly did no great harm.

 

The "Camelot" aspect I think was due to the Kennedy's being considered a sort of dynasty. Long infused in American politics, with many family members holding high office during his short term, it was almost as if they WERE our "royal family" complete with it's own "round table" of family members. One of the sketches in Vaughn Meader's parody/satire "The First Family" comedy LP is called, "But VOTE!" In it, a public service announcer reminds people that election day is approaching, and to go to the polls and vote. He quips, "Vote for the Kennedy of your choice, but VOTE!"

 

It's been reported that JFK thought the album was hilarious!

 

Sepiatone

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Well, not to turn this discussion of JFK into some kind of "Hyphenated American" thing here, but I have to ask ya here Kid about this comment of yours...

 

>my grandmother was 100% Irish and wouldn't let us forget "her" President.

 

So, how could any person "100% Irish", or 100% of any OTHER country for that matter, have a U.S. President as "theirs"?

 

(...yeah, yeah, you're right...this was a rhetorical question, so ya don't have to answer it...and yeah, I knew what ya meant) ;)

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I'm one that isn't interested in JFK and find all the stuff written and the movies associated with this 50 year event boring to rehash. i.e. I found it interesting and read books about the era and JFK 30 years ago, but I have no interest in rehashing this stuff today.

 

So I'll skip that programming.

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I was a young boy but I do remember the time JFK was shot. My dad rarely hit us kids but I remember complaining that nothing was on TV expect the news and I made a comment like 'who cares about some dead guy' and my dad hit me hard.

 

Again, I understand why there would be interest in events around the life of JFK. I guess my main point is that any anniversary doesn't get me more interested in something. e.g. many 50 year Beatles anniversary 'stuff' is coming up. That isn't going to make me read more about them during those weeks.

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McKinley was a character, and his assassination a major plot point, in the movie *This Is My Affair* with Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor.

 

And I'm not saying Kennedy doesn't deserve any place in history. I'm saying that the whole Kennedy era should be relegated from supposedly being a part of our current culture to a place in history.

 

And part of my talking about Huxley and CS Lewis is to point out that perhaps we shouldn't be treating our politicians as the most important people going.

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I'm not saying Kennedy doesn't deserve any place in history. I'm saying that the whole Kennedy era should be relegated from supposedly being a part of our current culture to a place in history.

 

Tell you what: You get TCM to stop showing any more Elvis Presley or Bob Hope movies until 2063, and I'll used my pull to keep them from repeating last night's JFK documentaries until then. ;)

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I might have been one of the last people in the US to find out about it. For some reason, I had gone home from school early (I was in 10th grade) and took a nap. My mother was at my grandparents' place. At about 3:30 EST, the phone woke me up, and my mother, on the line, asked me how I was handling it. I had no idea what she was talking about.

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