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laurelnhardy

2002-2006 films AREN'T classic movies!!!!!

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What I get from your reply is that 'classic' really has no meaning as it relates to movies and that TCM can show any type of movie they wish.

 

Both of those are my position. I also have no issues with TCM's programming (well other then I would like less repeats).

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I have a major problem with TCM showing any 21st Century movies. "70s and '80s...,great. But leave the more recent stuff to other cable channels. Define"classic" any way you want. I don't care how it's defined.

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Maybe they hired a programmer who is dyslexic, and thought he was working for TMC?

 

Sepiatone

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I don't have a major problem with TCM showing 21st century movies as long as they were shown related to a film series like The Story of Film and as long as this type of film series is limited to once or twice a year.

 

I also don't care how 'classic' is defined as it relates to what TCM shows. I just would like TCM to devote around 80% of their programming to American studio era movies. That leaves around 20% for 'out of the box' programming.

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I don't have a major problem with TCM showing 21st century movies as long as they were shown related to a film series like The Story of Film and as long as this type of film series is limited to once or twice a year.

 

I also don't care how 'classic' is defined as it relates to what TCM shows. I just would like TCM to devote around 80% of their programming to American studio era movies. That leaves around 20% for 'out of the box' programming.

 

That's about what TCM is doing now, and it seems like the perfect proportion. With 80% of the schedule devoted to the era whose movies are shown almost nowhere else on television*, TCM preserves its "brand" among Studio Era viewers, without repeating itself to the point of becoming an endless loop of movies we've all seen a hundred times.

 

*outside the occasional PBS Saturday night screening, chosen from an extremely narrow list of overexposed chestnuts, plus a tiny handful of FOX classics that remain exclusively on the FMC

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Well, if you don't mind commercials, and the general lack of letterboxing, there are also Antenna TV, the Sundance Channel, and Cosi.

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Well, if you don't mind commercials, and the general lack of letterboxing, there are also Antenna TV, the Sundance Channel, and Cosi.

 

I'd rather fly one way to Pyongyang, seated between a amphetamine-laced infant and a drunken stockbroker on a cellphone, than watch a movie interrupted by commercials.

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What makes you think that a drunken stockbroker would need anyone else on the other end of the connection in order to keep on talking?

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> What makes you think that a drunken stockbroker would need anyone else on the other end of the connection in order to keep on talking?

 

LOL!

 

Reminds me of a trip to Detroit city hall where I spotted a man furiously talking to "someone" into the reciever part of an old, pink toy telephone. With the string that was supposed to be the "wire" dangling into mid air...

 

Sepiatone

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Hey, everybody...I'm brand-new to these boards (as in, I registered about a half hour ago). I wanted to join the conversation because, yeah, I'm another one of those people who's been sitting in front of his TV irate every time I see TCM schedule a movie from the 80s/90s/00s.

 

Here's my take: It's really less a qualitative issue (i.e, what constitutes a "classic") than it is an temporal issue. I mean, why in the world is TCM showing stuff like A Beautiful Mind (tonight), The Holiday (earlier this week) and AI: Artificial Intelligence (a month or so ago), just to name a few? People can disagree on whether or not any of these are classics (except for The Holiday; that's an object lesson in mediocrity); the issue for me is that there are sooo many other cable channels that can and do show these films, whereas many of the films one sees on TCM can only be seen on TCM (save the occasional--and often shoddy-looking PBS airing).

 

Scheduling space is a zero-sum proposition: There are only so many hours in a month's programming grid. Why should space be taken up there by films that can be and are seen on numerous other channels when it can be used to show films that no one other than TCM will ever show?

 

I realize the Mark Cousins documentary throws a bit of a monkey wrench into this debate, because some people believe that showing a bunch of very recent films to complement The Story of Film is completely defensible. I don't feel too strongly one way or the other about that particular situation.

 

But A Beautiful Mind? Really?

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An excellent film in keeping with the month's Friday night theme of Science.

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>where I spotted a man furiously talking to "someone" into the reciever part of an old, pink toy telephone

 

That would be me!

 

Actually, back in the early days of those "brick" mobile phones, I had the handset from a 50's turquoise desk phone in my car with the curley cord going into the dashboard.

I can't tell you how many strange looks, then laughs I got at red lights repeating "blah, blah, blah" into it.

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All you people who keep insisting there are "soo many other channels" showing A.I., The Holiday and A Beautiful Mind, I want you to go out right now and find out just how many times those movies aired in America in the past year and on what networks AND how many of those airings were unedited and without commercial interruption. Go ahead. Get to work. The burden of proof is on all of you, since you keep insisting it's incontrovertible fact without providing a shred of proof. I need verifiable documentation.

 

I was happy to watch A Beautiful Mind on TCM. It's a terrific film. TCM hardly overplays it. To the best of my knowledge, that's the second time they've ever aired it, and it's been a couple of years at least since the last airing.

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Okay, so I just looked at the schedule for the next two weeks. TCM is showing only four films that were released after 1980 in those 14 days - Gandhi, The Remains of the Day, Philadelphia and Silkwood. All four are films that were generally well regarded by critics and were multiple Oscar nominees. I think many people would describe them as modern classics. I can't help you if you're inclined to hate all films released after a preset year in your head. But I have to say anyone who thinks TCM is pandering to a youth demographic, that is an insane argument. I assure you "the kids" aren't clamoring to watch the three-hour Gandhi. No, when TCM does occasionally show a modern film, it's almost always one that has been generally acclaimed.

 

So, that's about nine hours of the next 336 devoted to post-1980s films. NONE are post-2000. This idea that TCM has morphed into something radically, dramatically different than what it used to be is also insane. Look at the schedule for the next two weeks. There's your proof.

 

So, hopefully the message boards will be quiet about this topic for a while, at least until 31 Days rolls around, and a handful of modern films get shown. Then the person I suspect is the same poster will create six new identities and say TCM is responsible for the downfall of humanity multiple times (and will probably draw me offsides again).

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> So, hopefully the message boards will be quiet about this topic for a while, at least until 31 Days rolls around, and a handful of modern films get shown. Then the person I suspect is the same poster will create six new identities and say TCM is responsible for the downfall of humanity multiple times (and will probably draw me offsides again).

 

Just do the "trendy" thing and blame Obamacare!

 

Sepiatone

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Why I tend to agree with you (i.e. all is not lost and TCM has not gone to the dogs!), I can't agree that one should look at the programming of the next two weeks to form an opinion on this.

 

That is the same incorrect 'method' used by those that complain the loudest. One really needs to look at year to year trends.

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>One really needs to look at year to year trends.

 

One needs to look at each month's schedule, and do a decade search.

 

To search for 1930s films, simply use 193 as the search term. For 1980s films, use 198 as the search term.

 

Note also the air-times for the films. Many of the older studio classics are shown in the middle of the night, while everyone is asleep, and many of the newer films are shown in the daytime, prime time, and early evening.

 

If it was the other way around, with the newer ones being shown while everyone is asleep, and the old classics being shown in prime time. NOBODY would complain about that arrangement.

 

Let the new-film lovers be the ones who RECORD their favorite newer films, and let us 20-year TCM subscribers and fans have our old movies shown in prime time.

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By the way, Ted Turner saw this era coming because he knew that young people didn't like to watch black and white films.

 

His solution was to colorize them and tell us old-movie fans simply to TURN OFF OUR TV COLOR SETTING. Set it to 0 instead of 50%. That way WE would see the colorized B&W films in their original black and white, and the kiddies could see them in color.

 

But the method TCM is using now to solve this problem of young people not likeing black and white is to show MODERN COLOR FILMS in prime time and hide the black in white old classics in the middle of the night while the kiddies are asleep.

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> hide the black in white old classics in the middle of the night while the kiddies are asleep.

 

I assume by "kiddies" you mean teens and under-40 adults. Actual little pre-pubescent children would never be attracted to the kinds of movies TCM shows that are "modern", so you must mean teens and under-40 adults.

 

They're the very ones who are up late at night. It's old folks like you that are asleep.

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Why should TCM consider viewers like you Fred, more important than other viewers?

 

Also note that what you call 'new-film lovers' would be fools to watch TCM just to see 'new films' since TCM shows mostly 'old' studio era films.

 

Yea, I know you feel TCM is now showing too many 'new films' but really you have no evidence to show that at least 70% of TCM's programming, by year, isn't studio era movies.

 

Provide said evidence and I'll complain just as much as you do.

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>Why should TCM consider viewers like you Fred, more important than other viewers?

 

That's like asking why long-time History Channel viewers, who used to watch the History Channel EVERY DAY, are now upset because the History Channel NO LONGER shows great documentaries all the time, like it used to show during its first 10 to 15 years on the air, and now it is filled up with stupid idiotic "reality" shows, such as Catfishing by Hand, and Ice Road Truckers.

 

We long-time viewers of TCM are what made the network so popular as it is today, so that it can afford to have a major Annual Film Festival, and an Annual Film Cruise, and special personal theater appearances by its two stars, Osborne and Ben.

 

And in fact, I started subscribing to Ted Turner's first old movie channel, WTBS, as early as 1976, when it first went on cable systems, and guys like me are what made him a Billionaire. Some of us have been watching the Turner old movie channels for the past 38 years.

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With regards to the History Channel, do you know if their ratings and associated commercial revenue has gone down with their change in programming? That is really what matters to the owners of the station.

Please don?t misunderstand me. Generally I believe we have very similar taste in films and that we want TCM to show mostly studio-era movies. Also I agree with you 100% that the History Channel has gone downhill. But if a station is losing market share they have to adjust their programming. So I assume the History Channel wasn?t doing well and therefore felt they had to mix it up to try to gain a wider audience.

Like I have said many times programming is a balancing act. When a station makes changes they need to balance retaining longtime fans while attracting new ones. It is folly for longtime fans to expect a station to only cater to their taste. But I do understand why that would upset longtime fans. Take the So Cal Jazz station I used to listen to a lot. Well they moved away from the ?classics? and now focus too much on contemporary and new age jazz, blues, etc? So now I just use my IPOD!

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This battle has been lost. Classic/studio era fans will not be catered to, so don't expect to be. I have watched a number of 70s films during the past several months, mainly because I've seen (or own) all the studio era product available on TCM. It would be great if TCM acquired the rights to the pre-1950 Universal/Paramount library...that would really fill a void. It's a subject that is rarely even discussed nowadays. Also, there are still plenty of rare Columbia titles that have not been shown on TCM. Another studio whose product is missing is Republic. And what about the public domain Poverty Row titles from Chesterfield, Majestic, Mayfair, Invincible, Victory, Tiffany, et al?

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"It would be great if TCM acquired the rights to the pre-1950 Universal/Paramount library...that would really fill a void. It's a subject that is rarely even discussed nowadays".

 

This topic is discussed a lot at this forum. I don't know of anyone at this forum that doesn't wish TCM would get access to those movies.

 

Anyhow, TCM still shows mostly studio era movies. To imply otherwise is folly.

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