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laurelnhardy

2002-2006 films AREN'T classic movies!!!!!

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Geraldddd,

 

My response to FredC about facts was in response to his post basically saying facts didn't matter about why there were no films from the 1990s shown on TCM in January 1995 (and that was because prior to 2004, TCM concentrated on films from the 1920s-1980s.

 

I wasn't commenting on anything but that so not sure where you got the impression that I don't care about the west coast viewers. Heck, I am a west coast viewer.

 

I am one of the people who doesn't want to see TCM affect a hard line deadline of no films past a certain date. I love movies from all decades and am glad that TCM plays silents, studio era and modern films (and my posts through the years have reflected that.)

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@lzcutter : I was not commenting to you at all. I like what you have to say very much. I was responding to an earlier poster who complained about the time of day certain movies are shown. There are at least four time zones TCM has to serve. And this is a 24hr. world today

 

With the changes to this message board they have removed all the syntax. Now you have to search around and guess how to quote someone .Because of that, mix ups like this one are inevitable.

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With the changes to this message board they have removed all the syntax. Now you have to search around and guess how to quote someone .Because of that, mix ups like this one are inevitable.

 

Copy. Paste. Italicize. Comment below that.

 

And if you're making a reply to more than one person, name each person you're responding to in order to avoid confusion. :)

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deleted

 

Edited by: fxreyman on Feb 6, 2014 10:01 AM

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Thanks to Obrien for the following info on another thread!!!

 

Well I just did a basic count of the films and from which decades the most films being shown in May are from.

 

1920's: 9

 

1930's: 81

 

1940's: 118

 

1950's: 86

 

1960 - 1967: 40

 

1968 - 1969: 7

 

1970's: 29

 

1980's: 18

 

1990's: 5

 

So what I have done is this: I have included movies filmed during the 1960's to include films made up to and including the year 1967 as the last full year the Hays Production Code was in effect. On November 1, 1968, the MPAA was formed and the ratings system was created. I have decided to make 1967 the last full year of the production code.

 

So 393 films in total are being shown. Of this total I am not including shorts or docs. 334 films are being shown that were made up to the end of 1967 or near the break away year of 1968. 59 films are being shown that were made in 1968 and afterwards.

 

James will be happy about this:

 

The breakdown for the month of May is this: 85% of all films being shown are from before the end of 1967 and 15% of all the films being shown were made after January 1, 1968.

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And that means that even with all those newer Australian movies being given Friday nights, the majority of May films will come from just two decades: The 1930's and the 1940's.

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Yes indeed...

 

Although I think Fred still will not be satisfied.

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TCM is gradually increasing their 80s movies every month. Has anybody noticed ? i sure have.

 

A decade earlier , TCM included 68 - 79 movies (no problem with that). In the late 90s , it was 1930 - 1959. I've looked at the old schedules from 1995/96. I didn't see one film from the 60s on their schedules. TCM started including 60s films in the early 2000s along with some early 70s. Now , they're included more 80s movies on TCM. They've begun to change their image and theme back in 2007/08. Now, the channel is completely different from what it was 2 decades ago. They're doing this to attract a bigger age group. More people watching = more $.

 

A channel can't survive today with only 60 year olds watching. They need younger people watching (40 year olds, those around during the 80s). So , that's why 80s movies are included in their programming.

 

As for commercials , I don't see that happening with TCM. As long as AMC doesn't own TCM like AMC owns IFC, a channel that was one non commercial.

 

We are pretty lucky to have a channel like TCM. Increasing more later films in their programming is what's keeping the channel alive. With the older movies being still shown , younger people are being expose to the films and in that more fans of the older movies are being made.

 

So put on a smily face and stop complaining. Every thing is ok.

 

Edited by: classiccinemafan on Feb 8, 2014 3:00 PM

 

Edited by: classiccinemafan on Feb 8, 2014 3:01 PM

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>Although I think Fred still will not be satisfied.

 

 

fxrey, you treat me so mean, you make me feel so.... so.... obsolete.

 

*http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZymJAsxHbVg*

 

But your time is coming. After I'm gone, then your time will come when a bunch of young whippersnappers will say you are obsolete.

 

But anyway, I enjoy our discussions. :)

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>A channel can't survive today with only 60 year olds watching. They need younger people watching (40 year olds, those around during the 80s). So , that's why 80s movies are included in their programming.

 

Not sure how you could have missed all of the threads lately about this very subject. This is one of the oldest topics dating back to the early days of this message board back in 2001-2002.

 

Posters, in the other recent threads as well as this one, have provided statistical proof that there has been no large increase in 1970s-2000s films movies being shown.

 

On reason for the mis-perception of this was likely the last few weeks of the series, *The Story of Film* , that ran from the end of September until mid-December. The series was dedicated to the history of film as it went along, its focus changed from studio era films to modern films. As part of that series that ran on Monday nights, TCM programmed films that were either discussed in the series or were instrumental in the era being discussed. Thus, towards the end, Monday night films were from the 1970s-2000s, including many foreign films.

 

Modern films have always been a part of TCM's programming. On the evening the channel debuted on April 14, 1994, Robert Osborne welcomed viewers with this introduction:

 

"Hi, welcome to Turner Classic Movies. I'm Robert Osborne, I'm gonna be your host, right here, as we present some of the best, the--finest films ever made, twenty-four hours a day. We're going to be drawing not only from the great film libraries of MGM and Warner Brothers, but also from other outstanding catalogs, so: Come join us, and see not only great films and stars from the past, *but also films from recent years,* featuring some of our newest and most watchable stars."

 

This is the actual introduction that Robert O gave. It was part of his recent Private Screenings interview that aired earlier this month.

 

(Emphasis courtesy of slatyonf who transcribed the quote in an earlier thread:)

 

Here is their original mission statement:

 

"Turner Classic Movies presents the greatest movies of all time, from the 1920s through the '80s-- featuring the silent screen, International pictures, as well as all of Hollywood's genres--commercial-free, uninterrupted, 24-hours a day."

 

They amended that statement when the network celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2004 to include movies from the 1990s (and they may update it this spring when the celebrate their 20th anniversary).

 

As for their demographics, the idea that their largest demographic is senior citizens over the age of 60 is an urban myth. Their largest demographic is young people between the ages of 18-48. These young people love studio era films just as much as the senior citizens.

 

The idea that TCM is showing modern films only to entice younger viewers is a false one. If that were true, the programming would be much more skewed to modern films than it actually is.

 

Almost twenty years after it debuted, the bulk of TCM's programming remains focused on studio era films.

 

Just as it always has.

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I've looked at the old schedules from 1995/96. I didn't see one film from the 60s on their schedules. TCM started including 60s films in the early 2000s along with some early 70s.

 

I've got the vast majority of the Now Playing issues from 1998 to date, which covers all but the first year of that magazine. See if you still think that 1960's movies didn't come along on TCM until the early 2000's:

 

*TCM Schedule, JANUARY 1, 1998*

 

6:00 AM The Password is Courage *(1962)*

8:30 AM The Train *(1965)*

11:00 AM The Great Escape *(1963)*

2:00 PM In Harm's Way *(1965)*

5:00 PM The Dirty Dozen *(1967)*

8:00 PM Operation Crossbow *(1965)*

10:00 PM Where Eagles Dare *(1969)*

1:00 AM The Battle of Britain *(1969)*

3:30 AM Kelly's Heroes *(1970)*

 

15 years later, has there ever been a TCM day that was completely given over to movies from 1977 to 1995?

 

BTW among the many other later movies shown on TCM in January of 1998 were On Golden Pond (1981), The Man Who Loved Women (1977), Dirty Dingus Magee (1970), Bloom in Love (1973), Darling Lili (1970), Cold Turkey (1971), Funny Lady (1975), Adios, Sabata (1971), Westworld (1973), MacArthur (1977), and The Drowning Pool (1975).

 

So put on a smily face and stop complaining. Every thing is ok.

 

Amen, brother. As Vera Lynn might put it,

 

*"When you're up to your neck in hot water, be like the kettle and sing"*

 

 

 

Vera-Lynn-001.jpg

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