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What Ails Old Hollywood?


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>In The Shadow Boxer, a doctor has a lighted cigarette in his mouth as he's examining a newborn baby. It's not supposed to be funny, either.

 

That's the same effect used in the first two seasons of AMC's Mad Men. Casually and ignorantly doing dangerous, stupid and (now) forbidden things. This was used very effectively.

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How about the sadistic Bellevue Hospital nurse in Lost Weekend (played by Gene Ashley), telling Ray Milland what to expect when he eventually gets the DTs:

 

Nurse: You know that stuff about pink elephants? That?s the bunk. It?s the little animals ? tiny little turkeys in straw hats, midget monkeys coming through the keyholes. See that guy over there? With him, it?s beetles. Come the night, he sees beetles crawling all over him. Has to be dark, though. It?s like the doctor was just telling me. ?Delirium is a disease of the night.? (chuckles) Goodnight.

 

Lost-Weekend-2-520x391_zpse4904bee.jpg

 

Not exactly a kind approach in the treatment of alcoholism.

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> Speaking of Paul Muni, how about THE LAST ANGRY MAN, his last film?

 

I'm saddened by the fact that such a compelling novel was turned into such a poor movie. And it, sadly, had to be Muni's last. Wished he could have gone out on a brighter note.

 

It's funny that two professions people disdain the most( doctors and lawyers) make for the subjects in movies that people find the most interesting.

 

We LOVE a good story about some medical subject, be it about a doctor, disease, hospital goings on, etc.. And movies with "courtroom drama".

 

Speaking earlier about Woody Allen, I loved the bit in ZELIG where he took on the identity of a psyciatrist:

"I treated twins with schizophrenia. Got paid for FOUR patients!"

 

Sepiatone

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Here's a couple more:

 

In *Night Nurse*, two children are slowly starving to death and what's worse, the doc is a dope addict:

 

21b6vpl.jpg

 

Also - I couldn't resist posting this... Anyone else remember this? Dr. Killpatient comes to cure Elmer Fudd of Rabbititus:

 

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>Also - I couldn't resist posting this... Anyone else remember this? Dr. Killpatient comes to cure Elmer Fudd of Rabbititus:

 

That's a good one alright, Eugenia, however MY favorite Bugs cartoon which runs along this similar theme is "Hare Brush"(1955), and the one in which Elmer has been institutionalized because he thinks he's a rabbit, and entices Bugs to switch places and identities with him, And later when the asylum's shrink gives Bugs a pill to take and has him recite, "I am Elmer J. Fudd, Millionaire, I won a mansion and a yacht!" over and over.

 

And of course, the finale being one of the better Bugs Bunny cartoon endings(and a rare one because Bugs doesn't end up on top), and with Elmer sporting a rabbit suit and saying, "I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I ain't goin' to Alcatwaz!" as two IRS agents haul Bugs off to jail for tax evasion.

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" Reminds me of an old sitcom I saw where the doctor walks in to see his patient, he's got a cigarette hanging out of his mouth and he's hacking away like crazy."

 

Was this before or after All That Jazz (1979)? Roy Scheider is in the hospital bed, having had a heart attack. The physician is being asked by the producers of the musical if Roy is healthy enough to go back to work. The doc is wheezing, coughing, hacking, barely able to stand up straight...while a cigarette is dangling out of his mouth. A barely intelligible "Yes" is uttered by the doctor amongst his hacking coughs and ribcage-rattling wheezes.

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There's also the film Right to Romance (1932), where Ann Harding ostensibly plays a "doctor", but who really just seems to be a smoking beautician.

 

But seriously, I vote for Arrowsmith (1931). Among other things, I credit the film for leaving in - and not even cutting down - the part of the black doctor (Oliver Marchard, played by Clarence Brooks) who was in the book. Given the year it was made, I was frankly anticipating that the studio heads would insist that character be left out or rewritten.

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> I never read the novel, so I had no basis for comparison. Didn't Muni get a "Bast Actor" nomination for the film?

 

Yes, he did. And I've no qualms about Muni's performance. My gripe was with the adaptation. Dr. Samuel Ableman wasn't nearly as "laid back" in the book as he was in the movie.

 

Sepiatone

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*(Eugenia): *" Reminds me of an old sitcom I saw where the doctor walks in to see his patient, he's got a cigarette hanging out of his mouth and he's hacking away like crazy."**

 

*(karloffan): Was this before or after +All That Jazz (1979)? Roy Scheider is in the hospital bed, having had a heart attack. The physician is being asked by the producers of the musical if Roy is healthy enough to go back to work. The doc is wheezing, coughing, hacking, barely able to stand up straight...while a cigarette is dangling out of his mouth. A barely intelligible "Yes" is uttered by the doctor amongst his hacking coughs and ribcage-rattling wheezes.*

 

After thinking about it I remembered that the sitcom was "All in the Family", where Archie is in the hospital and his doctor comes to visit him... Since this show was also in the 70s, I wonder if there was some kind of connection to ATJ? Interesting!

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>'Dad' (1989)

>

>Excellent Jack Lemmon performance.

 

I'll second that, darkblue. I watched it several times in one week as it aired on cable some years ago. I may not be able to speak for everyone here, but I'm sure there are many who are going or have been through this process with their family. I've been through this several times.

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Eugenia wrote:

>I've never heard of that movie, tracey. Marlene Dietrich and Fred MacMurray? I have a hard time imagining that odd pairing.

 

Yup, in 1942, I believe. And they have surprising chemistry. And probably the cutest baby in old Hollywood. Dietrich is a musical comedy star on Broadway, with Aline McMahon (who is wondeful) as her assistant and keeper and Kenneth Hanline as her manager. She walks off with an abandoned baby and calls Fred MacMurray, who's a pediatrician to give him a check-up. She has to give the baby back, of course becasue she is neither solvent nor married and when she runs into MacMurray a short while later and he explains that his real love is research, she proposes a marriage of convenience. They do the deed, adopt the kid and predictably, fall in love.

 

During filming, Dietrich tripped over a cord or something while carrying the baby and twisted around so the baby ended up on top, breaking her leg.

 

Here's a short scene:

 

And some stills etc (and I did NOT know they dubbed her in this. weird.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OviqM_2ydQE

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