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The one movie TCM should show is...

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NIGHT LIFE OF THE GODS (1935). This is a rare (but not lost) Universal picture, based on Thorne (TOPPER) Smith's comic fantasy novel. Since it was made after the Code, the novel's naughtiness is considerably (perhaps completely) watered down. It's lack of star power has helped to keep it in the shadows (Alan Mowbray, Peggy Shannon and Florine McKinney weren't exactly big box office). But by all accounts, the special effects were up to Universal's high standards. The director was Lowell Sherman. TCM or Criterion or Kino needs to rescue it from oblivion.

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The 1932 western LAW AND ORDER.

 

It stars Walter Huston, one of the greatest character stars of the first half-century of film. The adaptation of the source novel by W.R. Burnett would be by John Huston. These two would be associated again for HIGH SIERRA and THE ASPHALT JUNGLE giving us reason alone to want to view their first collaboration.

 

The Burnett novel "Saint Johnson" is the basis for this retelling of the OK Corral story using fictional names instead of the familiar Earps and Clantons. I shouldn't say "retelling" because as far as I know, this was the first of many takes on the OK Corral event.

 

The legendary cowboy star Harry Carey gets the role of the Doc Holliday counterpart and unbilled is Walter Brennan who would later be seen in Ford's MY DARLING CLEMENTINE (perhaps the most celebrated version of the Earps vs. the Clantons) as Ike Clanton.

 

The film was directed by Edward L. Cahn, who like Edgar G. Ulmer (with THE BLACK CAT), made a highly acclaimed film for Universal and then faded into relative obscurity making "B" movies for the next 30 years. One of them is one of the most influential sci-fi films of the 50s - IT - THE TERROR FROM OUTER SPACE.

 

Hailed by the likes of William K. Everson and by Phil Hardy in his Encyclopedia of Western Films, LAW AND ORDER is rarely screened. It deserves the opportunity to be seen by those who only know of it by reputation. I'm one of them.

 

law_and_order.jpg

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I've already laid out my case for Angi Vera back on the first page of this thread, but if I'd want to see any movie called Law and Order, it'd be this:

 

law-and-order-movie-poster-1953-10107303

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*I've already laid out my case for Angi Vera back on the first page of this thread, but if I'd want to see any movie called Law and Order, it'd be this:*

 

That was the third time that Universal filmed the Burnett novel "Saint Jackson." That one I've seen, I found it mediocre.

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I believe it is a fiendish torture to require the selection of one movie only. I believe all of us have a host of movies we would like to see. To make a choice between them is as if you are asking a mother which child she loves best.

 

If I must select one movie only with any hope that you are actively seeking suggestions for actual inclusion then I must suggest:

*The Cigarette Girl from Moscow* (1924)

My reasons are that it is a charming comedy and it is a contrast to silent comedies which are shown often. It is mildly slapstick as well as very romantic. The movie carries also the self-effacing tone which is present in many of the characterizations. By this it works on many levels.

 

I believe a wonderful element is that it shows how the people involved in making early movies did not truly know what they were doing and had to make it up as they went along.

 

If that movie is unavailable or rejected for any reason then I will fervently ask that TCM explore the extensive library of Mosfilm. There are many comedies and musicals and other light fare from all eras.

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The Holly & The Ivy, a 1952 British film starring Ralph Richardson, Margaret Leighton & Celia Johnson. I can't imagine this is available anymore, but saw it with my Dad in our living room when I was just a small child. It's not your typical Christmas film. I remember it as being a very realistic family drama with this damaged family meeting for Christmas at their minister father's home right after WW11.

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I am amazed at some of your selections:

 

FEDORA 1978

THE MAGICIAN OF LUBIN 1979

PERSONAL FOUL 1987

Those Daring Young Men in Their Jaunty Jalopies 1969

GETTING STRAIGHT and THE STRWBERRY STATEMENT 1970

 

Not to be contentious, but there's always threads here discounting "too new" films shown on TCM. I'm so glad there are many here who consider post "golden age" films still worthy and "classic" enough for TCM.

Many more recent films (as well as Ed Wood films) are available on DVD and can be borrowed from your local library.

 

My movie buddy gave me a copy of WHISTLE DOWN THE WIND to see. I agree, it's a treat.

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"I believe it is a fiendish torture to require the selection of one movie only."

 

I'm delighted you see the madness in the method. :)

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The 1940 version of *The Way of All Flesh*, starring Akim Tamiroff. Haven't seen this one in 33 years.

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LOL. Well, I was the one who tossed out "Those Daring Young Men...Jalopies." I would have put "Gidget Goes to Rome," but TCM satisfied my hunger to see that little bit of nonsense, uninterrupted and in letterbox format, just this past year (Trudi Ames' career was waaaaaay too short!).

 

I have a British comedy from the 1950s I'd like to toss in the mix that I've not seen on TV since the 70s, but it was a one-film-only challenge. And I can wait.

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> TCMWebAdmin wrote:

> "I believe it is a fiendish torture to require the selection of one movie only."

> I'm delighted you see the madness in the method.

 

We have long known of the madness. It is the introduction of method which frightens me. :)

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sudden345.jpg

 

Going to agree with some other posters earlier in the thread and say SUDDEN FEAR.

 

My reasoning: it has three famous film stars whose motion pictures air on TCM-- Joan Crawford, Jack Palance and Gloria Grahame-- so it could easily be added to a tribute for any one of them.

 

And it could be re-aired during the 31 Days of Oscar, since Crawford was nominated as Best Actress for her performance.

 

But the best reason: it's a great classic film noir and it should be seen. :)

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The Son of The Sheik 1926. Starring Rudolph Valentino this is the sequel to The Sheik. The Sheik was shown a year or two ago on tcm, but I don't believe this gem has. It is an adventure movie that is superior to the first.

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Agree about 'Laura'... it should be an Essential. I like it, but I've seen enough 'Leave Her to Heaven' showings recently. I'd love to see 'The Earrings of Madame De' again.

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Forgot to add "Downstairs" with John Gilbert and Paul Lukas, and "Desirable" with George Brent and Jean Muir. The latter is an old WB 'women's movie' but it's a favorite of mine!

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I seem to be on a '70s Donald Sutherland kick. I've already mentioned The Day of the Locust; another one is Don't Look Now, a film by Nicholas Roeg that is so powerful it put a friend of mine into labor. These are two great and powerful films.

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>'Sudden Fear' features Joan Crawford's best performance. Outstanding.

 

Yes, indeed. She gave a lot of great performances, but this one is the ultimate. When I watch Crawford in SUDDEN FEAR I can't help but think how much she must have prepared for this role. Those final scenes where he chases her through the streets are riveting. How did she capture that terror and convey those kinds of emotions so convincingly? She almost goes to another place in this film. It's fascinating to watch her take us on this journey.

 

This is the one that made me a Joan Crawford fan for all time.

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*White Banners* starring Faye Bainter and Claude Rains. Without giving away too much of the plot, Faye Bainter plays the role of Hannah who by pure chance comes to the unselfish aid of the Ward family. Through her kind heart she is able to find what is most valuable to her.

 

 

TCM aired it a few years ago during a tribute to Claude Rains and I have never forgotten it. That was the first time I had ever seen or heard of this sweet gem of a film and would love to see it shown in the future if possible.

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