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What is George Arliss' Bacon Number?


FredCDobbs
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This is the most interesting stuff I've read all day.....

 

*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Degrees_of_Kevin_Bacon*

 

Even if you know what "The Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon" means, you might want to see these up-dates on this ever-expanding story and scientific theory, such as the new Google Bacon-Number search feature. :P

 

This is from that link:

 

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George Arliss's Bacon number is 3

 

George Arliss and Bette Davis appeared in The Working Man.

 

Bette Davis and John Laughlin appeared in Murder with Mirrors.

 

John Laughlin and Kevin Bacon appeared in Footloose.

 

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The Bacon number of an actor or actress is the number of degrees of separation he or she has from Bacon, as defined by the game. This is an application of the Erdős number concept to the Hollywood movie industry. The higher the Bacon number, the farther away from Kevin Bacon the actor is.

 

The computation of a Bacon number for actor X is a "shortest path" algorithm, applied to the co-stardom network:

 

Kevin Bacon has a Bacon number of 0.

Those actors who have worked directly with Kevin Bacon have a Bacon number of 1.

If the lowest Bacon number of any actor with whom X has appeared in any movie is N, X's Bacon number is N+1.

Here is an example, using Elvis Presley:

 

Elvis Presley was in Change of Habit (1969) with Edward Asner

Edward Asner was in JFK (1991) with Kevin Bacon

Therefore, Asner has a Bacon number of 1, and Presley (who never appeared in a film with Bacon) has a Bacon number of 2.

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Unless I have missed a proof in the last few years, there is nothing special about using Kevin Bacon for this algorithm. It could just as easily apply to any actor you pick at random. I happen to like Kevin Bacon (and had a colleague who once lived in the same apartment building with him in New York), but there is nothing special about him relative to this "game."

 

On the other hand, if someone has an Erdos number, that is a big deal in mathematics. Paul Erdos was a famous 20th century mathematician, prolific writer, and, of course, eccentric. He would often show up at a colleague's doorstep with a suitcase containing all his possessions, and say "my mind is open." Translation: "I need a place to stay, and while we're at it, we can do some mathematics." Anyone who has co-authored a paper with Erdos has an Erdos number of 1 (like starring in a film with Kevin Bacon). The number drops to 2 if you're co-authored a paper with someone who has co-authored a paper with Erdos, and so on. I have a young colleague whose Erdos number is 3 or 4, if I recall. That's impressive.

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Rich, I also like Kevin Bacon very much, and what you is very true. Nothing special in using Kevin as an example for that algorithm. On the games and trivia threads we've had a thread linking other actors to Paul Newman. for a couple of years. Many times numbers came up as 2's or 3's. Most actors with substantial careers can be used.

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Bacon IS special because during the past 36 years, he has co-starred with numerous actors and actresses and appeared in large ensemble pieces (i.e., Oliver Stone's "JFK" and Ron Howard's "Apollo 13") perfect for the Six Degrees Game. The shameful thing is that he's one of the leading actors in movies who has never earned an Academy Award nomination. Chances are he'll get that recognition someday.

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>lavender said: Rich, I also like Kevin Bacon very much, and what you is very true. Nothing special in using Kevin as an example for that algorithm.

 

I agree, especially when working in a limited pool such as "Hollywood".

 

But I use the "6 Degrees of Kevin Bacon" to illustrate in counseling that "we're all related and in this (life) together". It's a great pop culture reference that even kids can grasp the concept.

 

And I too am very impressed every time I see Kevin Bacon in a movie. I recently saw TREMORS on the big screen at a horror festival and although a very silly story, I completely believed Bacon.

 

He is an example of good acting elevating an otherwise bad movie.

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>But I use the "6 Degrees of Kevin Bacon" to illustrate in counseling that "we're all related and in this (life) together".

 

Yes, I was making this same point on another thread. While in the news business, I learned how amazingly "mixed" we all are. It is quite surprizing.

 

I've studied this and asked doctors about it. Seems that certain medications should not be given to certain people who have certain ancestry, and an average person DOES NOT KNOW their ancestry well enough to tell a doctor "what they are", so the doctors have to give them DNA tests to find out.

 

Because of the vast immigration to the US from all over the world, during the past 400 years, we are all mixed in some way, such as Spanish, African, Norwegian, Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Asian, Russian, Arabic, French, German, Pacific Islander, Native American, etc., etc. Many millions of Americans are part Indian (Native American) because during the first 300 years of immigration, mostly men came over from Europe, and many of them married Indian women in the 17th-19th Centuries, such as my great-great grandfather. :)

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>Now there's a film I've never seen or want to see. Slasher films, not for me.

 

I once met the guy who did the special effects for that movie. (heh back then it was one guy and his staff of three-nowadays it's PAGES of names working in a big company) and said almost the same thing to him.

 

He told me to rent the video (haha) and watch the entire thing with the sound off. He was right- I got to see the "special effects" very well and was not upset by what I saw at all. It just became people pretending, acting, very illogical.

 

For example; Kevin is laying in a bunk. Someone shoves an arrow from underneath up through his body. He writhes & screams and looks at the arrow without touching it, for "horror" effect.

 

Real life, you would arch your back and jump up if you felt anything shoved into you, not just lay there and scream.

 

SPOILER: The best effect is when Lilly Palmer gets her head lopped off with an ax. They cover her head in a black bag (visible) put her against a black back round and have her hands grasp for the missing head. Riiight. If your head is chopped off, your body drops.

 

The old slasher films are pretty low tech. To this day, if I ever borrow a newer "horror" film and it gets too intense for me, I just turn the sound off & watch the artistry of the effect. You soon find out there's zero plot.

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Tiki, that's an excellent idea :) Your comment about ZERO plot is part of the reason LOL besides the blood and gore. Nah, *Psycho* is about as far as I'm willing to go, and even that one is one I don't watch frequently. Could be because I saw *Psycho* first run in a theater when it came out and I was under 10 when I saw it. My sister had to hang out in the bathroom when I bathed for about 6 months after seeing it. Being that frightened at a young age by a scary film may have something to do with it LOL

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