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Strike Me Pink, 1936 - Thank You TCM


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I thought the print quality was not so good. I do not enjoy watching images on screen that are so faded it's hard to see the details in the composition of the frame. The picture is in need of restoration (if this is the best available print). But I do agree that Cantor is a treasure, and TCM does broadcast some of his other films from time to time that do seem to have clearer, sharper images.

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I actually thought your earlier observation about Eddie's 'dated-ness' was spot-on, finance. Yep, I too think "Ol' Banjo Eyes"'s shtick could be consigned to an era he shared with a contemporary and friend(and fellow black-face performer) of his, Al Jolson.

 

(...and of course I just HAD to yet again mention how much Messrs Cantor and Whorf looked a lot alike)

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I kept thinking that if you could substitute Buster Keaton for Eddie Cantor in the final fairground sequence, you would have a splendid comic scene. Cantor gets some of the laughs that are there, to be sure.

 

Like finance and Dargo, I think Eddie Cantor seems dated, as does Jolson, and that's what's most interesting about them. But I'll definitely agree that TCM should show more of Cantor's films.

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I feel sure TCM has shown this film before, because I was overwhelmed with a sense of deja vu as I watched it, and I can't imagine where else I would have ever seen it. I laughed aloud any number of times, and believe me, that doesn't always happen with me and a comedy from that era. The training session with the record; the confrontation with the mobsters when the secretary keeps interrupting and passing him a note; the college examination scene with the head bandage; the scene where he seemed to be spitting out bullets like Superman; I mean, I laughed a LOT, and ahead of time I wasn't even sure I was going to watch, given I know almost nothing about Cantor. Glad I gave it a shot (although, as I say, I'm pretty sure it's actually the second time I've seen it).

 

Funny to see Ethel Merman as the femme fatale. I was a little confused as to where the romance plot was going to go, because I thought early on in the movie that the secretary was meant to be with Cantor's dopey friend. But once he got written out of the story, I started rooting for Cantor and the secretary to get together.

 

I'm curious to see more Cantor. Robert Osborne seemed to indicate this film was pretty much it for quality Cantor, stuff, sadly, that the split between Goldwyn and Cantor ended up being detrimental to both parties.

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Thanks for the recommendation TopBilled. I'm a huge Cantor fan and don't think I've ever seen that one.

 

I also don't think Cantor's humor is dated. We've shown PALMY DAYS before and the audience LOVED it!

Our audience consists of people of all ages, but I was definitely surprised Cantor's antics delighted the teens and twenty-somethings.

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>Thanks for the recommendation TopBilled.

 

You're welcome. FORTY LITTLE MOTHERS casts Judith Anderson in a rare comedic role, alongside Eddie Cantor. And one of the little mothers is played by Bonita Granville. It's cute and there are some rib-tickling scenes with Eddie and the babies.

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>I'm curious to see more Cantor. Robert Osborne seemed to indicate this film was pretty much it for quality Cantor, stuff...

 

 

sewhite2000:

Glad to see that you enjoyed STRIKE ME PINK. As a long-time big Cantor fan, I think (as I know many other Cantor fans also do) that his six Goldwyn features made between 1930 and 1936 are his best, with STRIKE ME PINK the weakest.

So I want to encourage you, since you so much enjoyed what may be his weakest of the six, definitely check out the five that preceded it:

WHOOPEE (1930)

PALMY DAYS (1931)

THE KID FROM SPAIN (1932)

ROMAN SCANDALS (1933)

KID MILLIONS (1934)

 

There's much hilarious comedy, great songs and Busby Berkeley musical numbers and excellent supporting players. You will quickly see why Eddie Cantor was such a big star. Some of these are among the best comedies of the 1930's.

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King, interesting that you should make the connection between Buster Keaton and Eddie Cantor in this film. Although the script is "based on" the novel Dreamland, the character of Eddie Pink has much in common with a character from one of Keaton's earlier films. In *Spite Marriage* (1929), Keaton plays a tailor who is deeply smitten with an actress, played by Dorothy Sebastian. He spends most of his time daydreaming and staring at her pictures on the wall, damaging his client's trousers in the process. He is introduced to the object of his affection, only to learn he is "being played for a patsy". I understand it was common for Keaton's plots and stunts to be "recycled" in later films and for actors such as Red Skelton and Phil Silvers. *Spite Marriage* was his last silent film, and the last film M-G-M permitted him to direct, but it doesn't seem impossible the material was used for an Eddie Cantor film.

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