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Ever been afraid to watch a film?


speedracer5
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Has anyone ever been afraid to watch a film? I don't mean afraid, like the movie is a "chop 'em up, slasher" type film; but afraid, because the film is after an actor's horrific accident; or maybe it's a film significantly later in an actor/actresses' career and they're aged, or maybe look significantly different due to drug/alcohol abuse, bad plastic surgery, etc. Maybe you love this person at a certain point in their career and it'd be somehow heartbreaking to see them less than perfect or aged, or what not.

 

On this board, there is no secret about my love for Errol Flynn. Here is my example:

 

So I've seen a ton of his films from the beginning, peak of his career. Where he is considered his most attractive. I've seen a few of his films from the 40s, where he looks a little bit older than in 1935's "Captain Blood," (for example), but he still looks good. However, I know that by the 50s, at least the mid to late 50s, that his lifestyle and alcohol abuse was catching up to him and he was no longer the dashing matinee idol he was 15-20 years prior. Of course, I would expect someone to age somewhat in 20 years; but of pictures I've seen of Flynn toward the end of his life, he looked much older than his age.

 

I want to watch "The Sun Also Rises," as the cast sounds interesting, I love Errol Flynn and I enjoy Hemmingway. However, I don't know if I can bear seeing my beloved Errol Flynn aged and bloated. As a result, I'm almost hesitant to watch it.

 

Has anyone ever felt this way about a particular person or film? I know I can't be the only one who is slightly crazy.

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I approached one movie with trepidation because my fiance warned me that the main character in it is in his words: "crazier than the two of us put together." If you were to know us you also would cringe at such a possibility.

 

The movie is: *Anita Liberty* (1997). The story is of a performance poet who has dedicated her professional life to humiliating her ex-boyfriend in public. She wrote a book to help other women in similar circumstances. The title of the book is: How to Heal the Hurt by Hating.

 

I am happy to say that my fear was groundless for even although she is clearly a highly functioning psychopath she has raised banality to an art form and it is a truly hilarious movie. The greatest danger was that I laughing much harder than is healthy.

 

I do not fear watching actors age in movies because I have watched many movies where young actors were presented as very old through the medium of make-up. It may be that I subconsciously accept their truly older selves as being presented as of that age because it is necessary for the story and that they become their youthful selves at the end of the day by wiping off the face-paint and removing the prosthetics.

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I was afraid to see *A Passage to India.* It's one of my favorite novels, I love E.M. Forster, etc. The novel deals with issues that transcend the obvious facts of the narrative, as well as concepts that I thought would be impossible to film. I went with trepidation to New York's Ziegfeld Theater when the film opened. I was amazed. Even when David Lean diverges from the exact facts of the novel, he captures the novel's elusive essence and mystery. It's a brilliant work of art, in my opinion, far outclassing Lean's Lawrence of Arabia.

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I, too, find Montgomery Clift's work after "Raintree County" hard to watch. Especially "The Misfits." Knowing that it is Monroe and Gable's last film and Clift not looking anything like he used to. Gable looks haggard. Monroe still looks lovely. Knowing that within 6 years of this film's release, all the leading actors would be dead, makes the film bittersweet. Even though, I did ultimately end up enjoying it.

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I have been afraid to see every movie made from a great novel I have read and then was made into a movie. Most novels don't translate to the silver screen very well as the novels have to greatly condensed into 2 hours of screen time after having been viewed through the wonder of the Theater of the Mind during reading. Ann Rice and Stephen King novels come to mind as do other authors. Terrible movies except for maybe King's "The Shining" which still does not measure up to the book. I was rather afraid to watch the first of the Lord Of The Rings movies "The Fellowship of the Ring" since I had read Tolkien's great and wondrous books three times over the course of my life but I was pleasantly surprised by the excellent screen adaptations. BBC novel adaptations for long screen Masterpiece Theater presentation are the great exception as they can be many hours long.

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While I have seen many movies that were adapted from books, it's very rare for me to have read a book prior to seeing the film. I did read "The Great Gatsby" first and then saw the most recent movie version with Leonardo DiCaprio and I enjoyed it. I thought it followed the novel very well.

 

I tend to go the other way around and read the book after seeing the movie. Right now I'm reading "The Thin Man" by Dashiell Hammet. While the characterization of the film is similar to how they're written in the book, I'm already noticing quite a few differences between the book and movie. Not negative differences, just differences. Like in the book, Asta is a girl and she's a schnauzer, not a male wire hair terrier like in the movie. While reading the book, I can picture William Powell and Myrna Loy. That was perfect casting.

 

I am almost always apprehensive to seeing remakes of beloved films, or movie adaptations of beloved television shows. There's talk that there is a "Thin Man" remake in the works with Johnny Depp as Nick Charles. As much as I love Johnny Depp... I just don't know.

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>speedracer5:

>I want to watch "The Sun Also Rises," as the cast sounds interesting, I love Errol Flynn and I enjoy Hemmingway

 

Don't be concerned if you don't overcome your hesitancy, it's not so good. The restrictions of the production code robbed the movie of even the oblique storytelling that was in the novel.

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As I have stated many times in several threads, Natalie Wood is my favorite actress. It took me 20 years to finally see "Brainstorm". Given the tragedy and mystery surrounding her death, I could not bring myself to view her final film; all the sadness I felt for her and her daughters surfaced again. It was almost like revisiting the loss of a friend.........................

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Geminigirl, as someone who also loves Natalie Wood, I know what you are talking about.

I have not seen BRAINSTORM, and I don't know if I will ever be able to watch it. I don't know if I would say that I am afraid to see it. I just don't think I could enjoy it knowing that she died before completing it.

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I've been afraid to revisit movies I loved from my childhood-- afraid they wouldn't be good. Not that I can think of any titles off the top of my head of course.

 

Then there have been films from my childhood that I have been afraid to revisit because they freaked me out. THE SECRET OF NIMN was one I watched recently for the first time in YEARS and that animal testing sequence was still disturbing, but looking at it now years later I was able to say, "Look, rats, if it wasn't for the testing, you wouldn't be able to read, so there!"

 

I still won't go near RETURN TO OZ. Though I should just to face my fears as it were.

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Well, I can think of one........1971's "What's the Matter with Helen?" When it appeared on TCM's underground schedule, I could hardly wait to see it. I watched in anticipation of the ending having the same impact it had on me at the age of 15; what I got was a load of cheese. But one thing hadn't changed; Debbie Reynolds was coiffed and costumed beautifully...................

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'Return to Oz' is fabulous! It came across as such a shock with all that darkly-themed, decidedly non-children's movie, content at the beginning. Dorothy in an insane asylum due to her insistence on retelling her experiences - delicious!

 

Fairuza Balk should've become a much bigger star.

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I won;t go see Ender's Game. I liked the book so much the first time I read it years ago and I am so afraid of what they might have done to it. I also enjoyed the Dark is Rising books by Susan Cooper and the heinous mess they made of _The Dark is Rising_ (2nd in the series and the only one thank god that they ever filmed) just put me off watching the movies made from any kid's book I liked. (Except for the HP books--those movies I mostly loved).

 

On a totallt OT note--Are there any books that you read years ago that you do not want to read again for fear that your tastes have changed too much and you'll either be indifferent or worse, hate them? _Ender's Game_ is one of those for me, along with the Dune series and the Shannara books (why yes, I was and still am a bit of a nerd :) )

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>I have been afraid to see every movie made from a great novel I have read and then was made into a movie. Most novels don't translate to the silver screen very well

 

Indeed.

But if you give it a long span of time in between "reading" and "viewing", you may not notice what's missing quite as much.

 

My big thing is "horse" movies. Everyone wants me to see movies about horses since I'm an equestrienne. Most of them are just silly and perpetuate the notion a horse is just like a 1000 lb dog. When done well, like THE BLACK STALLION, fantasy takes over, mostly due to the incredible photography.

 

I was so pleasantly surprised by NATIONAL VELVET, because it's really nothing about horses, the strength of the story centers around family & aspirations. I was also pleasantly surprised by THE HORSE WHISPERER, which I dreaded seeing. It "worked" because again, it was mostly about the people, and the horse roles were realistic. (although NO city-mom would trailer a horse alone across country-it's a job for a professional!)

I still haven't seen WAR HORSE although given the DVD over a year ago, just can't bring myself to it.

 

But in a true "fear" way, I was afraid to see THE EXORCIST for about 20 years. I figured it wouldn't have the same impact as an adult as it would have when I was a teen, so I gave it a try. I was not really scared in any sort of way because most of the horror had been parodied so often, it lost all impact. (thank goodness)

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