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Ben Mankiewicz On Tonights Jeopardy


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I was dozing on and off, so I missed his first three questions. I can't remember No. 4 at the moment, but I believe No 5. was about the first movie to win Oscars for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay.

 

The Final Jeopardy! answer was extremely hard. The category was *Inventors*, and here's what the contestants had to deal with: "In an 1854 demonstration, he said, 'Cut the rope'; his invention kicked in, then he said, 'All safe, gentlemen'."

 

I'll leave the correct question out there for a while, in case others would like to guess it.

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I can see how a variation of a title or name would happen to someone in competition on a show like this.

Interesting that you read that about people being upset about the style of the champ. I didn't read that, but Alex did say, at the beginning, that the Champ went all over the Board to work on his strongest categories. I kinda get it, his style and what he's doing. By the way, I really did like that TCM/Ben was a Category.

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>mrroberts wrote: My first guess was Roebling with his wire strand cable but then realized it was the elevator guy, Otis. If the rope holding the elevator fails the elevator locks in place, it doesn't drop like a rock.

 

 

 

Yes, it was Otis and his elevator. I never would have guessed the answer in a thousand years.

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That's a different "Shangri-La" than the one written in 1946 and has multiple recordings by artists like The Four Coins in 1957, The Four Freshmen in 1962, Vic Dana in 1964 and the Four Freshmen in 1969. It's a pleasant but not too exciting old song.

 

The Kinks' "Shangri-La" really isn't all that good.

 

Sepiatone

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The Kinks' "Shangri ~La" is actually an epic recording. It starts out slow and melodic, and before its over, through several movements, rocks out furiously, before returning to a recap of the beginning. Sort of like a precursor to Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody", without the baroque excesses of that opus. Lyrically and stylistically, Ray Davies conveyed a nostalgic wish to return to simpler times.

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I agree with you that the Kink's Shangri-La is a very good song but I don?t interpret the lyrics the same way as you. (A wish to return to simpler times). To me the meaning is about NOT getting trapped in a life of simple comforts. That the type of Shangri-La related in the song is really a self-made prison. Note I assume Ray is cracking wise since that is his style.

 

So from time to time I listen to the song sitting in my Shangri-La. It has helped me to not become too set in my ways. After reflection I often take a vacation to a place I have never been before or go out and do something I have always wanted to but just didn?t get around to.

 

Either way, a first rate song.

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