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DIED? Here's a new one!


Sepiatone
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I can't remember which forum member, Tiki comes to mind, that claimed they HATED the use of terms like, "passed away" or "crossed over" in mentioning the death of someone famous or otherwise.

 

I ran across a new one.

 

The Detroit Free Press ran an obituary of ANNA GORDY GAYE, who just died at the age of 92. She was the older sister of Motown founder Berry Gordy, and a driving force in the label's music production. She was also MARVIN GAYE'S first wife.

 

In the obit, a statement released by the family said that she "TRANSITIONED".

 

Won't be long before we learn that some poor soul had "Morphed" into eternity!

 

Sepiatone

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I don't know how it is in Detroit. but around here the wording of obits, especially those with, shall we say, "non-traditional" wording are the doing of the family or in some cases even the departed themselves.

 

As I recall, a number of years ago, there was a prominent lady who had "transitioned" and left instructions that her obituary should list her nine cats as survivors, but not to mention her children.The executor of her estate did as instructed and the kids didn't find out until they read it in the paper. I suspect that there must have been quite a back-story to that one.

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That was me. It was I who composed a ranting post about the new squeamishness when it comes to using the "d" word. Now everyone says "passed away" or worse, "passed". "Transitioned"? I think I'm going to be sick.

If, when I die, any of my friends or family says I "passed away", I will come back to haunt them.

People never used to be in such denial about this extremely basic fact of life, death. It both annoys and on a deeper level, troubles me that our society has become so uncomfortable with speaking about such an inevitable and real part of being alive. It comes to an end. It's called "dying", and it's not evil or shameful or to be denied.

"Passing" is a stupid euphemism that I hope will, uh, pass.

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This topic caused me to remember when a long-time projectionist in my hometown died his obituary began "On Monday, after fifty-five years in the projection booth, John Smith ran his final reel".

Actually, I kind of liked that.

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Sorry I forgot it was you, MissW. But reading that immediately reminded me of the rants. I also gag a bit whenever I hear someone at the funeral parlor say, "He's in a better place, where all his troubles are over." If that's true, then why is everyone else so sad?

 

Somewhat on the topic, there are two quotes related to death that I've always liked. The first, which the source is unknown to me, is:

 

"Life is one terminal disease for which they'll never find a cure"

The second? Comes from the Bob Dylan song "It's All Right Ma( I'm Only Bleeding)"

 

"Him not busy being born is busy dying"

 

Sepiatone

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I just love these expressions.

Old radiomen are "off the air" or "closed their logbook".

Airmen, if killed in a crash,"augered in", as in bought the farm, or if no crash, and a natural death, "throttled back and sideslipped away".

From Irish culture, as in Trinity, by Leon Uris. Uncle Kilty, "got away".

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Anna Gordy was instrumental in Marvin Gaye's career, especially at the beginning. She encouraged his songwriting, as well.as his self confidence. Being married ro ths boss' sister didnt hurt him either. Later, that became a problem, especially when he fell in love with a young girl on the early 70s, and decided to divorce Anna. The divorce decreed that he must turn over royalties of his next album to her. His first idea was to record.some c**p, but his artistic instincts took over, and he did "Here My Dear", one of his finest lps imho. Poorly reviewed as self indulgent when released, this reflection of his relationship to Anna from its beginning till it ended, is now seen as a cohesive statement of a true artist. At the time, Berry Gordy did not promote it; it did not shed a good light on Anna; so it sold poorly.

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I've always liked "croaked," "pushing up daisies," and "on the other side of the grass."

 

I recently learned that "bought the farm" originated in WWI, not WWII, as I had thought. For the few that may not know, that's because GI life insurance went to the family of the dead soldier, and they literally "bought the farm."

 

There's a Monty Python skit, about the "Norwegian Blue" parrot, where there is a string of euphemisms for dead.

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