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Semi-OT: How LED Streetlights Will Change Cinema


Richard Kimble
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http://tinyurl.com/mlplyoq

 

>The announcement last year that Los Angeles would be replacing its high-pressure sodium streetlights?known for their distinctive yellow hue?with new, blue-tinted LEDs might have a profound effect on at least one local industry. All of those LEDs, with their new urban color scheme, will dramatically change how the city appears on camera, thus giving Los Angeles a brand new look in the age of digital filmmaking. As Dave Kendricken writes for No Film School, "Hollywood will never look the same."

 

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Prayer has been answered, my area only started replacing the blue mercury vapor with that nauseating YELLOW sodium lamps within the past few years. Blue/white mercury vapor has always been my favorite and dreaded seeing my area turning yellow.

 

There are a couple of huge light towers near my house and for some reason, I think someone else hates yellow because they turned down the voltage and the sodium lamps glows blue. So far only about 20% all lighting within a mile is sodium.

 

LED? I don't care as long as it gets back to the way it use to be.

 

LED street lights in Taiwan. Soothing. :)

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Mercury vapor light

Mercury_Vapor_Streetlight.JPG

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>I think someone else hates yellow because they turned down the voltage and the sodium lamps glows blue.

 

Haha, no one changes things because they don't like them....it changes because of MONEY.

 

I definitely prefer the new "flat" bulb design of the new streetlights-they only shine "down" without as much sideways bleed.

It's much better to illuminate the road than illuminate the sky.

 

You really notice the horrific extent of light pollution flying at night. I can see the glowing clouds of both Toronto and NYC at the same time when flying in upstate NY.

 

As for film, eh, there's filters. And with everything digital it's even easier to modify light & colors.

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> As for film, eh, there's filters. And with everything digital it's even easier to modify light & colors.

 

My thoughts also. I mean, if they can make average sized cars turn into giant robots on film, that orange glow shouldn't be too difficult.

 

When they first put up those sodium lights around here, they looked kinda cool. But the color got annoying after a while. Most areas around here did away with them some time ago. It's no problem inside Detroit proper, as most the streetlights don't work at all there.

 

Sepiatone

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Looks to me like the new lighting will look more natural, just like the old white light bulbs of the past. Sort of 1940s and 50s noir lighting.

 

In fact, Hollywood probably has to use filters now for long shots down old streets, while making an old type retro noir film, to get rid of the orange street light color.

 

Ha! A major retro move by modern science! Now we need to return to big long bulky cars, dames in cotton print short skirts and cute hats, no women wearing blue jeans and t-shirts.

 

And next we can return to 4:3 movie images and a lot of black and white films. :P

 

Ahh, the good old days!

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Ham, I've been to a couple of remote places out here in the Southwest where there isn't much light polution at all, with the nearest towns being small and 50-60 miles away.

 

I camped out a few nights and I couldn't believe how bright it was, with just the starlight, no moon, just stars.

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