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STUPID QUESTION THAT'S DRIVING ME SLIGHTLY MAD


AndyM108
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Last night I watched the last hour of Stalag 17, a movie I hadn't seen in many years. When Sefton (William Holden) discovers that Sgt. Price (Peter Graves) is the real German informer, his discovery centers around *(SPOILER ALERT)* a swinging light bulb and a hollowed out chess piece.

 

But here's what's been driving me slightly nuts ever since the movie ended: Since it wasn't Stalag 17, what movie was it where the spy within the P.O.W. ranks was uncovered when he mistakenly said that the Brooklyn Dodgers were in the same baseball league as the Yankees? It's a classic scene that I'd always associated with Stalag 17, but obviously my distant memory was off.

 

So what movie am I thinking of? Was William Bendix in it?

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There was something like that in "Battleground." It happened at a checkpoint where they got into a discussion about baseball and one of the Germans dressed as an American soldier messed up.

 

Not sure if that is the one you mean but that is what popped into my head.

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There was something like that in "Battleground." It happened at a checkpoint where they got into a discussion about baseball and one of the Germans dressed as an American soldier messed up.

 

Not sure if that is the one you mean but that is what popped into my head.

 

Thanks, movieman. I can't remember whether I've even seen Battleground, but by a stroke of fortunate coincidence it's showing in the pre-dawn hours tonight, so I'll know the answer tomorrow if nobody else clues me in before then. None of the plot synopses of Battleground that I can find online mention the incident, but I've heard so many references to it over the years that I doubt it's just something I dreamed up.

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Yeah, well, tell ya what Andy. After you find out the answer to THAT whole "WWII Movie/Dodgers/Yankees/Will Bendix" thing, I've had a question that's been drivin' ME a little nuts(okay, nuttier) for years now myself, and it too involves WWII and how a certain inadvertent message gives away the character to his enemies, though in THIS case it's the reverse and about how an American is discovered to be a spy by the Nazis while undercover in Germany.

 

It involves a scene where while eating dinner at a table full of Nazis, the American is momentary and purposely distracted by the lead Nazi officer who has suspicions about the American being a spy, and the Yank begins to cut his meat and then switches his fork over to his right hand in to bring to his mouth as most Americans do and unlike the European manner in which to dine.

 

So, what movie is THAT in, huh?! Anybody remember this scene at all and what movie it's in? 'Cause I remember seeing this as a kid on TV and have been unable to get the definitive answer to it for years now.

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Although I haven't seen it in many many years, because it's never shown anymore, the film is {I believe} O.S.S. with Alan Ladd. There's a scene in it where the agents are being trained and a man explains that the Germans will notice if a person cuts his or her meat and switches the fork back to their right hand. Sure enough when Ladd is in a cafe and he sees a fellow agent do this and notices the German officer watching the man and the mans cover is blown.. Sadly this is another of Paramount's many films that never see the light of day..

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classiccinemafan wrote:

Eight Days a week makes no sense, but it's a pretty good song.

 

 

The guy is telling his girl that his love is so strong that she can depend on it "8 days a week". Since there are only seven it means she has it every minute of every day, a constant. It's a beautiful sentiment but hard to live up to as we are all only human and imperfect.

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>how do the Beatles figure there are 8 days in a week ? I know of only 7. PLEASE EXPLAIN if you can. Eight Days a week makes no sense, but it's a pretty good song.

 

Well ccf, tell ya what. I'm a little busy right now, BUT If you'll remember to get back me later this month of February, say around the 30th, I promise I'll fill ya in on how all that could happen!

 

;)

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>Wasn't there a scene in Battle of the Bulge where the German (disguised as American) at the checkpoint screws up the baseball question?

 

Speakin' of the "Battle of the Bulge", Mr.R...Did ya hear they're making a remake of this movie? Yep, though it's set in present day NY/NJ, features a certain bridge(no, but KINDA like "A Bridge Too Far"), and is actually titled what it is because of the weight issue a certain governor in that part of the country is battling right now!

 

(...yeah, yeah, I know...ya saw that one comin' across the G.W. Bridge WAY before I even got half-way through it, didn't ya!) ;)

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>classiccinemafan wrote: how do the Beatles figure there are 8 days in a week ? I know of only 7. PLEASE EXPLAIN if you can.

 

The only explanation possible is that the term originated with Ringo Starr, who had a clever way with words. It's because of him that the Beatles' first movie was titled "A Hard Day's Night."

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Well, I'm sure you know the reason kwai..err..why THAT bridge failed wasn't because of any structural issues, but because that darn Brit Hawkins talked Holden into "helping" it fail.

 

(...and what did poor ol' Holden get for his troubles?...yep, riddled with bullets from a freakin' Kyūroku-shiki Kei-kikanjū machine gun!)

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There was a similar scene -- this seems to be something scriptwriters love -- in a Korean War movie. Communist soldiers are dressed as G.I.s; Americans ask, "Where you from?"

Answer: "Chicago."

Question: "How are the Cubs doing?"

Answer (puzzled): "Cubs? -- A cub is a small bear -- "

That's when the G.I.s know that these are Commie infiltrators.

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Question: "How are the Cubs doing?"

Answer (puzzled): "Cubs? -- A cub is a small bear -- "

That's when the G.I.s know that these are Commie infiltrators.

 

I dunno, I've met many Northsiders from the Toddling Town who've devoted most of their sober moments *TRYING* to wipe all memories of the Wrigleyites from their conscious thoughts, and not all of them were Commies. ;)

 

soxbeatcubs.jpg

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Yes Ringo came up with both titles. But he inadvertently would blurt these things out, and the others would zoom in on them. In the case of "Eight Days A Week", I always thought it was similar to the concept in Spanish usage, where 8 days is used to denote a week. Starting today, and counting to one week from today, that is 8 days.

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mrroberts wrote:

<< Wasn't there a scene in Battle of the Bulge where the German (disguised as American) at the checkpoint screws up the baseball question? >>

 

Could had tragic results if some poor GI didn't like baseball or care less. Wonder if one can be shot for that?

 

Your second question about Ringo, its Beatlemania this year. (again)

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I always wondered if the 8 days came from the music scale; where there are only really 7 notes but the scale is played as 8 notes with the Root played at the start and end.

 

While 8 Days is a catchy tune it is really bubble-gum music. I often hear people site the song as a reason they don't like The Beatles and in many ways they have a point. I'm sure it isn't one of Yoko's favorites (but what does she know!).

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For the first two or three years of their success, the Beatles' singles, and other songs, we're done to formula; even so, the formulaic Eight Days A Week had an innovation, as did many of their singles. The fade in and fade out were something new. However, this song, penciled in as their next single, lost out to an even more innovative recording "I Feel Fine". In America, where Capitol repackaged each of tfheir early British albums, and released two for every one in Britain, EDAW became another number 1 hit .single. It was only after they stopped touring that they had the luxury of spending more time and care on their music, instead of releasing "product" to a predestined schedule. That is when the development of their sound beyond the Mersey sound formula was able to develop. To this day, they are the example par excellence of a band that developed as they went along.

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>Arturo wrote: Yes Ringo came up with both titles. But he inadvertently would blurt these things out, and the others would zoom in on them. In the case of "Eight Days A Week", I always thought it was similar to the concept in Spanish usage, where 8 days is used to denote a week. Starting today, and counting to one week from today, that is 8 days.

 

 

I believe Ringo also influenced the title of "Tomorrow Never Knows," John Lennon's psychedelic song from the Beatles' 1966 album "Revolver."

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