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YOU'RE A BIG BOY NOW


HoldenIsHere
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I'd been wanting to see this movie for awhile now so I'm glad that TCM aired it today.
I think everyone would agree that showing movies I want to see is TCM's raison d'être.

Francis Ford Coppola's first film for a major studio features an amazing cast: Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, Rip Torn, Karen Black and Julie Harris as "Miss Thing."

The glasses worn by Peter Kastner in this 1966 movie are actually "in style" in 2014.

Coppola supposedly hated the movie when he saw it recently, but I found it very enjoyable especially the New York City locales (which include the New York Public Library and Macy's).

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Wonderful movie. I was an usher in early 1967 when it played our theater and I watched it over and over - thought it was the most charming movie I'd seen since 'A Hard Days Night'.

 

Michael Dunn is a joy to watch in anything and Toronto's own Peter Kastner should have become a more well known actor. Elizabeth Hartman was never sexier, Karen Black was never cuter, and supporting players like Dolph Sweet and Tony Bill never funnier.

 

An outstanding soundtrack by John Sebastian and the Lovin' Spoonful is the cherry on top of a thoroughly delightful mid-60's coming of age comedy.

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This movie charmed me in the theater years ago too. I think Peter deserved more roles in features as well, darkblue. It is not an easy character to convey.

 

The soundtrack is the best! and the basic premise we will be seeing again (nebbish young man as anti-hero and getting life lessons) in *The Graduate*.

 

Coppola seems to me a perfectionist, so maybe watching his earlier works through the eyes of someone who knows so much more now can can be painful.

 

Coppola does alright with a off-beat charmer like this one.

 

Edited by: casablancalover2 on Feb 13, 2014 8:13 AM

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It was so disappointing when TCM cancelled a scheduled showing a while back, so it was great that it finally played. I hadn't seen it since I saw it in a theater in 1966, but I remember playing the soundtrack LP a lot. "Darlin' Be Home Soon" is one of the best songs ever written for a movie.

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The movie has so many fun moments.

 

A favorite is the reaction of Miss Thing (Julie Harris) to I.H's "private collection" of erotica in the secret room in the library.

And, course, Miss Thing's rooster that keeps young women from entering her apartment building.

 

Was that really Geraldine Page running down the streets of Manhattan during the chase scene or was it a stand-in?

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Peter Kastner starred in another excellent movie two years earlier in 1964 made in Canada called NOBODY WAVED GOODBYE. I have been trying to find this movie for years with no luck. If anybody out there has information about this movie, please post on this thread. Thanks.

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Another of his movies I have a great fondness for is 1971's 'B.S. I Love You' - a somewhat counterculty comedy with him as a young agent working in the world of advertising who is seduced by his desire to experience some of the more carnal benefits available in that era of free-love. His journey from naivety to self-realization is reminiscent of his 'You're a Big Boy Now' persona in many ways.

 

The low score for 'B.S. I Love You' at imdb (4.4 last time I checked) is, in my opinion, much too low for a movie I've remembered so well for so long. Peter Kastner was capable of so much emotional expression in such a likeable manner.

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'Nobody Waved Good-bye' was seen in Canada in 1964. It was seen in the U.S. the following year.

 

New York radio played commercials for it, saying:

 

Unusual news about an unusual, new motion picture. It's called, "Nobody Waved Good-Bye," and here at last is a real, down-to-earth, dramatic film that shows what teenagers feel and never tell; what parents see and never understand. It's a story of what's happening all over America. The story of privileged children, their desperate parents, and the stone wall between them. What's happening on the screen is happening in Derry End, in Great Neck, in the Bronx. It's what's turning ten millions of homes into battlegrounds. Today's children seem to be growing up so fast, marrying fast, and falling apart fast. Their confused parents ask, "Why?" and confused teenagers ask, "Why not?" The name of this powerful picture is "Nobody Waved Good-Bye," and no parent, no teenager, nobody should miss it. See "Nobody Waved Good-Bye" plus "Lonely Boy" starting Wednesday at Loew's Capitol and Murray Hill theaters.

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This thread intrigued me so I got a copy of this out of the library-THANK YOU-it was a real treasure!

 

I was amazed by Elizabeth Hartman, I only knew her as the blind girl in PATCH OF BLUE. She was adorable in her role, especially as a go-go dancer.

And so fun to see Julie Harris in a more aggressive adult role instead of her typical weak wallflower type roles. She was much prettier than usually depicted.

 

What a time capsule of fashions and locales. I'm sure when it was made, not a thought went into it. But now so much of that is gone in NYC. The soft porn shops of Times Sq, department stores containing simple racks of clothing (that you can actually see over) and especially the small independent record stores.

Now, everything's a chain. Oh how I'd love to rummage through one of those record stores and shoot the breeze with knowledgeable staff.

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"I was amazed by Elizabeth Hartman, I only knew her as the blind girl in PATCH OF BLUE. She was adorable in her role, especially as a go-go dancer."

 

I wonder if Elizabeth Hartman might have been a little bit like Barbara Darling in real life. Such a sad ending to a very talented actress.

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Julie Harris had the kind of beauty that doesn't overwhelm you at first -- but keep looking, you'll see it.

 

About the independent record stores: there was one called The Record Hunter; it carried nothing but classical records. I wonder how long it lasted?

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>About the independent record stores: there was one called The Record Hunter; it carried nothing but classical records. I wonder how long it lasted?

 

 

Until 1992.

 

I was in a couple of record stores earlier this week. Picked up a copy of the sound track for You're a Big Boy Now. They still smell like the sixties -- the stores and the records.

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This one of my all time favorite films. I was just a few years younger than "Bernard" and saw it at a movie theater in Manhattan at 66th Street and Broadway, just blocks from the location of Bernard's apartment. I lived at 81st street and Broadway.

 

This coming of age comedy with Bernard moving into his first Manhattan apartment, trying to escape a domineering mother and finding romance with the luscious Kern Black really touched a nerve in me. Add the terrific Lovin' Spoonful music and I was hooked!

 

Watch for the skeleton of the new Madison Square Garden and posters advertising the Beatles at Shea Stadium as Bernard roller skates up 8th Avenue.

 

I saw Francis Ford Coppola on "Inside The Actor's Studio" and he said that he wanted to make a movie about the two greatest things in life; young love and hot pretzels!

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I wonder if Elizabeth Hartman might have been a little bit like Barbara Darling in real life.

 

Even though the focus of the movie is the story of Bernard Chanticleer, I like that Coppola gave some insight into the background of Barbara Darling. I love the part where she is telling her "story" especially her experiences in high school with the albino hypnotherapist with the wooden leg (which she stole and keeps in her apartment). I also love it when Barbara bites the tongue of the actor who slips it to her during the kiss in the play they're performing in. Barbara Darling is such an interesting mix of egotism and sensitivity---the scene where she throws Bernard out of her apartment and then immediately begs him to come back is a good example.

I think Elizabeth Hartman must have tapped into some aspects of her own personality to bring Barbara Darling to life in such a vivid way.

I love this line of Barbara's to Bernard: "Now Easter Bunny will pour you a little glass of milk. It will be warm and nice and you-know-what."

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"I love this line of Barbara's to Bernard: "Now Easter Bunny will pour you a little glass of milk. It will be warm and nice and you-know-what."

 

Yeah, that's the way girls use to talk to me in 1966. I can totally identity with Bernard. Women were both fascinating and terrifying at the same time.

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"Now Easter Bunny will pour you a little glass of milk. It will be warm and nice and you-know-what."

 

Thanks for bringing that up...I don't know "what"....what? Or was it just an insinuating tone where you can fill in the blank?

 

I think the transition of Bernard first thinking Barbara's some otherworldly angel and realizing she's bonkers is depicted wonderfully in this movie. We discover this along with him.

(I admit, I was one of those stupid confused girls and was dazzling enough for most boys to actually put up with that! Hey, it's a good lesson for both sides)

I love when the other girl is kissing him but all the signs in Times Sq say BARBARA.

Elizabeth Hartman was great. She certainly was a perfect example of a freewheeling 60's chick. She really had talent & beauty.

 

But again, I was very impressed with Julie Harris-I guess seeing how beautiful she was made it more surprising she rarely took "beautiful leading lady" type roles, but instead more "artsy" type roles. She reminded me a lot of Ruth Gordon in her depiction of the landlady.

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